God: The Initiator of Salvation

This post was submitted by a reader, Jenai Rothnie, and we are grateful for her contribution. Edited by Eric Kemp.

Recently, Dr. Roger Olson wrote a blog post, “For Fellow Arminians and Quasi-Arminians (Non-Calvinists): Prevenient Grace” [1] in which he asked the thoughts of those who do not identify either as Calvinists or Arminians on the topic of prevenient grace. This is the question he addressed:

“Is a special act of the Spirit is required to overcome the fallen nature of a person so he is then able to believe?”

Dr. Olson framed this as there being only three options: Belief in irresistible grace; belief in prevenient, but resistible grace; or belief that the initiative in salvation is human.

However, there is a more fundamental question that Dr. Olson leaves unaddressed. Does spurning the idea that an unregenerate, fallen man is incapable of responding to the gospel in faith, the theory of Total Inability which is shared by Calvinists and many Arminians, mean that one must believe that man is “the initiator in salvation”? I do not see a good reason to think so. Indeed, this is a false dilemma, since there are other options. In other words, there is no logical reason that disbelief in one would mandate belief in the other. All Christians can agree; God initiates salvation. To illustrate this let me ask yet another series of questions I will spend the rest of the article exploring:

What does it mean for God to initiate salvation? How does God initiate salvation? And would a response to the gospel in faith outside of a special act of prior regeneration or enabling grace be the logical equivalent to man initiating salvation?

“Initiate” As a Verb

As with many soteriological topics, it is important to define terms. As I define the different ways “initiate” can be used, I will show how each understanding does not require Dr. Olson’s presumption of “Total Inability” for God to initiate salvation. The Miriam Webster definition of the verb ‘initiate’ [2] is as follows:

1: To cause or facilitate the beginning of: set going, such as to initiate a program

The ‘program’ God initiated is Salvation. He caused the beginning of this program by sending Christ as Savior – something He planned from the foundation of the world – and revealing Him to man (Acts 28:28, I Pet 1:20, Tit 2:11.) The exact method for this program He initiated to be effectually fulfilled is the New Covenant in Christ’s shed blood, salvation being given to those who enter this Covenant through faith (Lk 22:20, Gal 4:24-31.) News of this program is then spread through the gospel message (Acts 8:12, Isa 52:7, Rom 1:16.)

2: to induct into membership by or as if by special rites

God inducts believers into His household and into the church as members (Eph 1:5, Rom 8:14, Rom 8:29, Jn 1:12-13, I Cor 12:27.) The first ‘rite’ He uses is baptism – identifying the believer as dying with Christ to their old self which was dead in sin, and raising that believer to new life in Christ (Rom 6:3-4, Rom 7:6, I Pet 1:3.) The born-again believer is granted the indwelling Spirit, given spiritual gifts to aid in the edification of the church, and adopted as a son of God and brother of Christ. (Rom 8:9, I Cor 12:7-11, Jn 1:12, Eph 1:5.)

3to instruct in the rudiments or principles of something: Introduce

There are many elements God uses to instruct in the rudiments and principles of salvation. The general law of God written on people’s hearts, the general conviction of sin the Holy Spirit gives the world, the teachings of Jesus and the Apostles, scripture, and the gospel message are just a few of them (Rom 2:14-15, Jn 16:9, II Tim 3:15, Eph 2:19-20, Rom 10:8-11, Heb 4:10). Even the law points us to Christ and the need for a Savior (Acts 7:52-53, Gal 3:24.) These all ‘introduce’ us to Christ, the good news of the Kingdom of God, and the way of salvation. For the believer, God continues to teach and instruct us via the indwelling Holy Spirit, scripture, and our relationship with Christ (Jn 14:26, I Jn 2:27, II Tim 3:16, II Pet 1:3-11.)

“Initiate” As a Noun

Initiate:

  1. A person who is undergoing or has undergone an initiation

The person who repents and turns in faith to Christ is the one undergoing God’s induction into His household and the church (Eph 2:17-19, I Cor 12:27, Col 3:15)

  • A person who is instructed or adept in some special field

The believer is given the Holy Spirit to instruct Him in all things, scriptures to develop godliness, and relationship with Christ so that he may bear fruit (Jn 14:26, II Pet 1:3-11, Jn 15:5.)

The Initiate Is Not the Initiator

If God inducts the believing one, then it can be said that the believer is inducted by God. The believers’s agreement to join Yahweh’s group or program doesn’t change that. Yahweh is the one to admit the new Christian into membership and instruct the believer. The believing one’s assent to undergo the initiation merely affirms God’s role as initiator; it does not somehow make the believing one the initiator.

A fallen human hearing the gospel message about the Savior and subsequently turning in repentance and faith to Christ in no way makes that human the initiator of salvation. It is a logically absurdity, a contradiction in terms; the initiate cannot be considered the initiator.

Initiation into the New Covenant

One of the most important concepts in scripture is the New Covenant (also known as ‘The New Testament.’) The New Covenant is a two-party covenant between God and His people, attested to by the blood of Christ (Gal 3.) Yet a person has to enter that New Covenant by faith to become part of it. Only inside the New Covenant can he be cleansed by Christ’s blood and claim the promises of it (Heb 9:11-22, Gal 3:14.)

“This is good, and pleases God our Savior, who wants all people to be saved and to come to a knowledge of the truth. For there is one God and one mediator between God and mankind, the man Christ Jesus, who gave himself as a ransom for all people.” I Tim 3-6a

The New Covenant is initiated by God. The securities and promises of the New Covenant are also initiated by God (Gal 3:22, Gal 4:30-21, Heb 12:22-25). Becoming a ‘grantee’ of those promises by faith does not, even in part, make a person the grantor. Christ initiated the ‘New Covenant’ in His blood, sealing it with His death and thus making it available for all mankind to enter it through faith. Our willingness to enter the covenant does not mean we made or initiated the covenant or initiated the giving of its rewards, including the promise of salvation (Gal 3:10-29, Col 1:21-23). At best we could say, colloquially, that our entering the covenant by faith begins our entering the covenant by faith – but that is just a tautology, and not treated in scripture as an impossibility for man like fulfilling the works of the law would be, but rather a requirement (Jn 6:28-29).

God As Initiator

God ‘initiates’ salvation by revealing the Savior and the offer of salvation to everyone, asking them only to believe, like a King both preparing a feast and sending out invitations asking people to come. For most people today, that invitation will be upon hearing the gospel. Faith is our acceptance of that invite, our trust in the feast to come.

God then effectually grants the believer salvation – we die with Christ and rise by the power of the Spirit to new life in Christ, an entire process which is initiated by God, sustained by the power of the Spirit, and continues until the believer physically dies and is resurrected with a new spiritual body. At no point does man do any of the actual ‘saving’ part, whether by accepting the offer or continuing to abide in Christ and walk by the granted indwelling Spirit.

Just as the initiator of a group or rite might have conditions for the initiate to follow, so God has the requirement of faith to be inducted into His household, to be grantees of the Covenant, to receive a regenerate nature, and to be recipients of Christ’s deliverance. If a fallen human were capable of responding to the gospel in faith, that would not logically make him the initiator of salvation – it just makes him an initiate. As such, the argument that the only alternative to Calvinism’s ‘Irresistible Grace’ or Arminianism’s ‘Prevenient Grace’ would be ‘Man Initiates Salvation’ is unfounded.

Below you will find brief comments of other passages which all Christians should be able to agree shows that God initiates that, we would argue, do not require Total Inability.

Further Evidence

Here are 12 other non-exhaustive ways in which God initiates both the general offer of salvation to all mankind and the effectual granting of salvation to those who believe:

  •  God sent Christ into the world as Savior (Isa 63, Jn 17:3, Jn 3:17)

Man did not ask for a Savior or bring up his own savior or save himself. This sending was initiated by God.

  • Christ ‘illuminates’ the way to eternal life. (Heb 1:3, Jn 1_3-4)

A man who sees the light and walks into it does not initiate the light. Without the light given first, he would not have even walked into it, so it cannot even be said that he initiated coming into the light. He responded; he did not initiate.

  • God spoke to mankind through Christ during the Earthly ministry of Jesus (Lk 3:23, Heb 1:1-2, Matt 4:23)

This teaching of the kingdom of God and other truths was not initiated by man. Jesus taught the message to His disciples who shared it, but they did not teach by their own initiation. And no one who heard or even believed him initiated His words.

  • By the Father’s will, Jesus was lifted up, drawing all men (Jn 12:32, Isa 5:26, Isa 10:11.)

Jesus is the one who is the beacon or rallying-point to which the nations look. He initiates the signal. He initiates the shelter offered to those coming to Him. He initiates the deliverance granted to those coming to Him.

This lifting up also initiated the opportunity for true healing to all. As Moses lifted the snake on a pole so that anyone who looked at the snake would be healed by the power of God, so God initiated the opportunity for healing through Christ’s work on the cross. Anyone who trusts in Christ’s sacrifice on the cross would be healed by dying to sin and be given eternal life in Christ (Jn 3:14-16, I Pet 2:24)

God initiates that call to be healed to all, and initiates the healing itself to those who look. Those who look do not become the healer, but merely accept that call to be healed and accept the healing God will then effectually initiate.

  • Now that Jesus has ascended into Heaven (Heb 4:14,) God continues to illuminate the way through the gospel about Christ (II Tim 1:9-10, Jn 12:46, etc.)

By making the “righteousness apart from the law” known to all the world, anyone can now ‘see’ the way of salvation when presented the gospel. The gospel message ‘introduces’ those who hear it to Christ and the way of salvation, and some will respond to it in faith. (Rom 10:8-15.)

  • The general revelation of God’s natural law written on the hearts of man shows the reality that we all sin (Rom 2:15-16.)

God ‘writes’ His law on the heart of man. An unbeliever who, at times, follows this law does not initiate the law or actualize it somehow by obeying. Their obedience, incomplete though it is, is rooted in the prior law of God written on their heart.

  • The general conviction of sin in the world by the Holy Spirit reveals the need for a Savior (Jn 16:8-11.)

When man feels convicted for a sin he commits, it is not himself that initiates the conviction. The Holy Spirit does. If he heeds the conviction and repents, that repentance is still rooted in the conviction that the Holy Spirit initiated. It cannot even be said that man initiates his own repentance, since that ‘change of mind’ was initiated by the conviction of the Spirit that his natural mind was wrong. Man can also choose to ignore that conviction or reject it, rather than repent, but that cannot stop the Holy Spirit from continuing to convict the world regarding sin.

  • An unbeliever who turns in faith becomes the baptized initiate, not the baptizing initiator.

For a new believer, God inducts him into the church, the body of Christ, through the ‘ritual’ of baptism. He takes the dead-in-sin condemned person and cleanses their conscience before Him, identifying that person with the death of Christ and so ‘killing’ the old self which was dead to sin (I Pet 3:12, Col 2:20.) As Christ’s death fulfilled the law, so the believer dies to the law (Rom 7:4.) God then identifies him with the resurrection of Christ, regenerating him unto a new life by the power of the Spirit, which then is given to that believer to indwell him as a helper. The new ‘alive in Christ’ believer is now dead to sin rather than dead in sin (Rom 6:1-14.) The believer is now ‘born again’ of the Spirit (I Pet 1:3, I Pet 1:23, Jn 3:5.)

  • For believers, God inducts us into His household by adoption (Gal 4:4-7.)

    God adopts us, we do not adopt Him. Our willingness to accept Him as Father is not the same as being the one who initiates the actual offer of adoption or the one who initiates and performs the adoption. Not only this, but this adoption was already settled before time began, when God predestined that He would adopt all those ‘in Christ,’ i.e. adopt all believers (Eph 1:4-5.)

  • For those initiates in the New Covenant (believers,) God initiates the promises of the Covenant according to when He says they will occur. For present members of the Covenant: the Spirit to teach us and perfect us and flow from us like living water, God’s peace and armor to guard us, etc. (Jn 16:13, Jn 7:37-38, Gal 3:3, Eph 6:10-17.) For the future, Christ to raise all believers on the last day and grant us new Spiritual bodies, and for God to usher us in to His eternal rest (Jn 6:40, I Cor 15:42-58.)
  • For believers, God initiates the bearing of Spiritual fruit (Gal 2:22-26, Jn 15:1-8)

    “Remain in me, as I also remain in you. No branch can bear fruit by itself; it must remain in the vine. Neither can you bear fruit unless you remain in me.” Jn 15:4

The believer must remain in Christ and walk by the Spirit. But does this ‘initiate’ the fruit? No – the initiation is from Christ our support, the power of the Spirit, and the will of the Father.



[1] Olson, Roger. “For Fellow Arminians and Quasi-Arminians (Non-Calvinists): Prevenient Grace.” Roger E. Olson My Evangelical Arminian Theological Musings, Patheos, April 26th, 2019, https://www.patheos.com/blogs/rogereolson/2019/04/for-fellow-arminians-and-quasi-arminians-non-calvinists-prevenient-grace/

[2] “Initiate.” Merriam-Webster. Merriam-Webster, Inc, 2019. Merriam-Webster.com. Web. May 14 2019.

763 thoughts on “God: The Initiator of Salvation

  1. For it is God which worketh in you both to will and to do of his good pleasure. Phil 2: 13. This is prevenient Grace. One does not have to believe in total depravity to believe in prevenient grace. One can simple assert that grace was not withdrawn from mankind to the extent that Calvinists teach but prevenient grace continued to work with man after the fall in paradise ( albeit differently) and still “enlightens every man that cometh into the world” and that those who are not converted cannot blame a lack of irresistible grace but rather will have to blame themselves for “receiving the grace of God in vain.”

    1. Thank you dnjohn for this post.

      Am I correct to assume this is a position held by some who see themselves as in the Arminian camp?
      If so it would appear that not all Arminians hold to Total Depravity.

    2. Until recently I had little problem with the term Prevenient Grace since that is what I thought it meant – simply all the graces that ‘go before’ a persons conversion, such as Christ revealing Himself and acting as an illuminating light to all to reveal the Father and the truth (Heb 1:1 even says as much, with Christ as the ‘effulgence’ of the Father’s glory, likened to the rays of the sun which allow the people on Earth to know the sun exists,) conviction of the Holy Spirit, hearing the gospel, etc. And it is sometimes used in this sense, in which case I would not disagree with it at all.

      Unfortunately, I’ve realized it is that isn’t always what the term means – isn’t even what it is used for the majority of the time, so it is a ‘charged’ term and not a clear one.

      The “FACTS’ of Arminianism (like Calvinism’s TULIP) include “Total Depravity” as the T and hold that fallen humans are “unable to believe the gospel” in their current state. The main concept of Prevenient grace is in the “F” of their summarized views, “Freed by Grace to believe” – wherein God enables everyone who hears the gospel to believe. That ‘enabling grace’ is what Prevenient Grace is. I think there is probably a wide umbrella as to what that actually means, but the core idea is that man can’t believe, due to total depravity, so God must specially enable men (beyond the graces of the gospel itself, the revelation of Christ, the drawing of all by the cross, etc.) in a supernatural manner to overcome their sin nature so they are able to believe.

      But that is an unnecessary step only required by prior belief in the faulty view of Total Depravity. God specifically chose faith as the condition to graciously grant salvation because fallen man could believe in a promise whereas they couldn’t be perfect under the law or achieve salvation by their own power or merit. Fallen humans believe in tons of things we can’t prove or don’t directly see – being persuaded of various truths happens to even unbelievers. So there isn’t really a reason to think a fallen human ‘can’t’ believe the gospel by nature even when presented with it without God stepping in to enable them further.

    3. dnjohn writes, ‘For it is God which worketh in you both to will and to do of his good pleasure. Phil 2: 13. This is prevenient Grace.”

      If we preface this by Philippians 1:6, “God who began a good work in you will perfect it until the day of Christ Jesus.” we see that your “prevenient grace” refers to the sanctification process.

    4. You should probably check the context of your proof-texts before posting comments. I don’t particularly disagree with the meat of your conclusions, but your proof is off.

      As Rhutchin stated, the context of Philippians is already-saved individuals. Christians. I think Rhutchin brings up a good point when he says that this seems more like progressive sanctification given the context.

      I also critique your usage of 2 Corinthians 6:1, “We then, as workers together with him, beseech you also that ye receive not the grace of God in vain.” The context here as well as before is fellow Christians. They have already been converted, or have already “received the grace of God.” Receive is active, not passive. They’re Christians, and so they won’t be blaming themselves for anything eternally in the way you suggest. They’ll be enjoying eternity with God just like the rest of us. What this passage speaks to is ignoring the active grace of God in our lives and not progressing in our sanctification.

  2. Thanks for this article.

    The article mentions the wedding feast. That story alone (told by Christ) should be enough to convince the Calvinist. God prepares the feast and invites. Some say no….He opens it up to all. Not only does He initiate….but is shows that his grace is resistible.

    The OT shows His grace being resisted thousands of times. Why is this so hard to see?

    The monergistic-run site Got Questions (who side with Calvinists) show their double-speak when discussing this feast:

    “Note that it is not because the invited guests could not (italics) come to the wedding feast, but that they would not (italics) come (see Luke 13:34). Everyone had an excuse. How tragic, and how indicative of human nature, to be offered the blessings of God and to refuse them because of the draw of mundane things!”

    Once again a double standard. They say it is 100 monergistic yet they say they “could have come” and that they were “offered the blessing” but refused. Those are both a no-no in Calvinism!

    According to Calvinism no offer is extended, because if it was it would be irresistible.

    1. I agree, the Wedding Feast is an excellent picture of this! No one would claim those invited initiated the invitation, or that by putting on the wedding garments (garments that were likely provided to the guests, culturally, showing a picture of God clothing us with Christ’s righteousness) that someone would “initiate” the very wedding feast they had been invited to.

      As for Gotquestions, they have more than one writer on staff. I have seen some of their posts mention whether an answer is from a 4-point or 5-point perspective, but yes some of their answers can be quite at odds with others. An entire post on what is regeneration, for example, emphasizes several times that we must have faith to then be regenerated, get a new birth, be made spiritually live, be reconciled and adopted, etc. And no where does it state that one must be regenerated or partially regenerated first to get faith. (Which is not usually the view of a Calvinist…) Yet another article on Total Inability contradicts that over and over by insisting, again over and over, that Total Inability is a summary of “what the Bible teaches” about fallen man being unable to get faith, and prior regeneration/being made spiritually alive, is needed.

      It’s a bit dizzying to follow sometimes. Many of their answers are imported into eBible though for content, which is where I usually read them, and I can at least comment my disagreement with them there.

  3. From the article, “What does it mean for God to initiate salvation?”

    The Calvinist.Arminian debate presumes that God initiates salvation through a spiritual change in the reprobate person. The Calvinist calls that act the new birth; the Arminian says it affords all people the ability to hear the gospel and respond either positively or negatively (basically reducing to a Pelagian system). Prior to that spiritual change a person may hear the gospel (this by the grace of God) but will always resist that grace. That situation is not discussed in the article. The article says nothing objectionable to Calvinist or Arminian other than the presumption that reprobate an can make a spiritual decision to accept God’s offer of Salvation. However, the author seems to side with the Arminian on the issue of prevenient grace saying,

    1. “Christ ‘illuminates’ the way to eternal life [to all].
    2. “By the Father’s will, Jesus was lifted up, drawing all men”
    3. ‘The general revelation of God’s natural law written on the hearts of man shows the reality that we all sin”
    4. “Now that Jesus has ascended into Heaven (Heb 4:14,) God continues to illuminate the way through the gospel about Christ
    5. “The general conviction of sin in the world by the Holy Spirit reveals the need for a Savior”

    I doubt that Roger Olsen would quibble with that as his prevenient grace probably includes such things.

    The author asks, “Does spurning the idea that an unregenerate, fallen man is incapable of responding to the gospel in faith, the theory of Total Inability which is shared by Calvinists and many Arminians, mean that one must believe that man is “the initiator in salvation”?” The answer by the author, based on the four acts of God above, seems to be, Yes.

    1. Hi Rhutchin,

      You might find it helpful to read the referenced blog post by Roger Olson on the subject and the comments under it, where it was clarified that in his view of Prevenient Grace, another grace beyond all those you just mentioned, of a supernatural sort, is required to enable the fallen sinner to believe. His view does ‘include such things’ as the article above, but goes father to include a further required, enabling grace of some kind. It is the failure to believe something ‘further’ is needed, (such as enabling prevenient grace, prior regeneration, partial regeneration, some men just being given effectual faith, the faith of Christ being applied to some but not all, or other theories proposed once the theory of Total Inability is accepted.)

      I am curious as to why you think an essay about the myriad and multiple factors in which God initiates salvation, and the human responding to the gospel in faith makes the human an initiate of the Covenant, baptism, God’s household, etc. but in no way an initiator, would somehow “support” the idea that fallen man would become the initiator in salvation if capable of responding in faith.

      Also, why do you specifically believe that someone rejecting the Calvinist/Arminian theory of Total Inability would necessitate his rejecting all the ample passages of scripture (many listed in the above post) as to how God graciously initiates salvation? Why would someone rejecting the theory fallen man is unable to respond in faith to the presented gospel, even with all the grace God gives, logically mandate that they believe man is the initiator?

      And more important than personal beliefs, why would God Himself somehow become the non-initiator of Salvation if He graciously and sovereignly chose a condition that even fallen men could meet; faith; as the requirement for entering the Covenant and being graciously granted salvation, as it would not be based in man’s merit or effort or will, but solely God’s gracious choice to offer and win and credit to them?

      1. Sorry this line was not finished:

        “It is the failure to believe something ‘further’ is needed, (such as enabling prevenient grace, prior regeneration, partial regeneration, some men just being given effectual faith, the faith of Christ being applied to some but not all, or other theories proposed once the theory of Total Inability is accepted) that was treated in his blog post as equivalent to believing that man initiates salvation.

        My post was specifically to address that false dilemma. Someone isn’t mandated to reject God as the Initiator of salvation if he rejects the Calvinist/Arminian premise of Total Inability. There are more than “just three” options.

      2. Jenai Rothnie writes, “the referenced blog post by Roger Olson on the subject and the comments under it, where it was clarified that in his view of Prevenient Grace, another grace beyond all those you just mentioned, of a supernatural sort, is required to enable the fallen sinner to believe.”

        The blog was a little confusing where it has, “…prevenient grace (enabling, assisting grace that goes before conversion making it possible) is supernatural and a special work of the Holy Spirit freeing the will of the sinner which is otherwise bound to sin (unbelief). ” I found, “…freeing the will…” interesting as the Calvinist has “quickening the spirit.” If all prevenient grace amounts to is freeing the “will” from slavery to sin, I think Dr, Flowers might qualify as a proponent of prevenient grace as his point seems to be that this is the effect of hearing gospel.

        The issue of TD/TI is the condition of man’s spirit – is the lost person spiritually dead and thereby unable to respond to God and if so, what must God do to negate that condition – as stated above, ““s a special act of the Spirit is required to overcome the fallen nature of a person so he is then able to believe?” An argument is then given to answer the question, “What does it mean for God to initiate salvation?” The ensuing argument leaves out any Scripture that Olson or a Calvinist would point to in support of TD/TI This allows the author to say, “Below you will find brief comments of other passages which all Christians should be able to agree shows that God initiates that, we would argue, do not require Total Inability.” Leave out the opponents argument and you can easily argue your position. But, so what?

        Then, “I am curious as to why you think an essay about…factors in which God initiates salvation, and the human responding to the gospel in faith makes the human an initiate of the Covenant, baptism, God’s household, etc. but in no way an initiator, would somehow “support” the idea that fallen man would become the initiator in salvation if capable of responding in faith.”

        I don’t think this. The argument is not whether man initiates his salvation but whether man cooperates in his salvation – God does His part and man does his part to procure salvation.

        Then, ‘Also, why do you specifically believe that someone rejecting the Calvinist/Arminian theory of Total Inability would necessitate his rejecting all the ample passages of scripture (many listed in the above post) as to how God graciously initiates salvation?”

        I don’t believe that. Certainly God initiates salvation – the question being, To what degree must God act to enable a person to be saved. If TD/TI is correct, then certain actions are called for and Calvinists and Arminians can cite Scriptures detailing these actions. If ane argues that TD/TI is not correct, then those Scriptures may be ignored as the essay above does.

        Then, “Why would someone rejecting the theory fallen man is unable to respond in faith to the presented gospel, even with all the grace God gives, logically mandate that they believe man is the initiator? ”

        Let’s use the question asked in the essay, “there is a more fundamental question that Dr. Olson leaves unaddressed. Does spurning the idea that an unregenerate, fallen man is incapable of responding to the gospel in faith, the theory of Total Inability which is shared by Calvinists and many Arminians, mean that one must believe that man is “the initiator in salvation”?”

        The answer is, Yes. Under Total Depravity, a person cannot respond to the gospel for two reasons – (1) he is spiritually dead, and (2) he has no faith with which to respond. If one rejects this notion of TD, then the presumption is that faith is inherent and something a person is born with. The person has a faith that seeks an object for his faith. If a person has no faith (thereby being TD), and can only receive faith through the hearing of the gospel, then of course, God becomes the initiator of salvation through His gift of faith (among many other graces).

      3. rh writes:
        “Does spurning the idea that an unregenerate, fallen man is incapable of responding to the gospel in faith, the theory of Total Inability which is shared by Calvinists and many Arminians, mean that one must believe that man is “the initiator in salvation”?”

        The answer is, Yes. Under Total Depravity, a person cannot respond to the gospel for two reasons – (1) he is spiritually dead, and (2) he has no faith with which to respond. If one rejects this notion of TD, then the presumption is that faith is inherent and something a person is born with. The person has a faith that seeks an object for his faith. If a person has no faith (thereby being TD), and can only receive faith through the hearing of the gospel, then of course, God becomes the initiator of salvation through His gift of faith (among many other graces).”

        Now there’s a novel idea. People are born with faith? Where in the world did he pull that one from? Calvinists and non-calvinists alike recognize – and debate – the meaning and method of man coming to faith in God’s promised salvation. I have never heard anyone suggest that men are born with said faith. But, of course, he does not really believe any such thing, he is just offering a strawman, as Calvinists are wont to do. Plus, it is an attempt to retain the imported, made-up definition of faith as some sort of entity that can be given and received, like a material gift.

        Just assert anything, however absurd, as necessarily true if one rejects Calvinism’s particular doctrines. No one is suggesting, or likely ever thought of, men being born with inherent ‘faith’. Nor is it even slightly possible, for faith is not a trait or a gift, but a voluntary response to something that is declared to be true. Once confronted with a truth claim, a person has the opportunity to believe, reject or reserve judgment. Belief in the truth of a truth claim is not an inherent trait, nor can it be randomly passed out, like tickets to a ballgame. Faith is a choice, in this case, to believe the claims and promises of the One, True God.

        Obviously, as scripture notes (asks rhetorically), no one can believe what they have not heard; hence the call to spread the good news. Nowhere does scripture ask ‘Who can believe unless he has been regenerated and made alive so that he can then be given the gift of faith, unsought and irresistibly bestowed upon a select few, chosen in eternity past by God?’ Nowhere.

      4. TS00 writes, “I have never heard anyone suggest that men are born with said faith.”

        And that is why you believe in TD/TI.

      5. Rhutchin,

        If someone does not believe the Earth is made of cheese, it does not logically mandate that they must believe the Earth is flat. Not believing men are born with faith doesn’t mean someone must hold to Total Inability. A false dilemma isn’t made more true by repeating it. “Given effectual faith by God” and “Born with faith” are not the only options, exclusive of all other possibilities.

        We aren’t born with faith in the gospel We aren’t effectually given faith in the gospel. We “have faith” when we welcome the gospel message so as to believe in Christ (Acts 2:41, Jn 1:12, Eph 1:13, Acts 4:4, etc.)

        Re-read Rom 10:8-17. There you will see how faith comes, and it is neither by being “born” with it or it being effectually given by God. You will also see that the requirement for faith that is given is first hearing the word, not some other method like being regenerated/given faith/made alive/etc.

      6. Glad you’re here, Jenai. We need all the help we can get to call rhutchin on his logical fallacies. 😉

      7. JR: “Not believing men are born with faith doesn’t mean someone must hold to Total Inability.”

        In Hebrews, we read, “…without faith it is impossible to please God…” Then, in Romans, “,,,those who are in the flesh cannot please God.” Further, “…the mind set on the flesh is hostile toward God; for it does not subject itself to the law of God, for it is not even able to do so;” The terms, “impossible” and “unable to do so” point us to Total Inability.

        Then, “We “have faith” when we welcome the gospel message so as to believe in Christ…”

        I agree. In Hebrews we see that faith involves assurance and conviction. The gospel conveys assurance and conviction to people but not all who hear the gospel receive such assurance and conviction. So, something differentiates the one from the other. Nonetheless, it is this assurance and conviction (i.e., faith)that manifests as belief in Christ.

        Then, “There you will see how faith comes, and it is neither by being “born” with it or it being effectually given by God. You will also see that the requirement for faith that is given is first hearing the word,…”

        I agree. But not everyone who “hears” the gospel comes to belief in Christ. Something accounts for one person to hear the gospel and believe Christ while another hears the gospel but does not believe in Christ. Christ would refer to a person “having ears to hear” and we can understand that Christ was differentiating between those who have spiritual perception and those who do not. What does spiritual perception involve? We could say that it involves the ability to see the kingdom and enter the kingdom. In John 5, we see that a perosn must be born again for that to occur.

      8. Rhutchin,

        Heb 1:6 says that without faith it is impossible to well-please God, NOT that without faith it is impossible to respond to the gospel in faith.

        Look at the phrase ““…without faith it is impossible to please God…” in it’s context:

        “Now faith is confidence in what we hope for and assurance about what we do not see. This is what the ancients were commended for. [Why would they be commended for it if they a) couldn’t have it or b) it was something effectually given them?] By faith we understand that the universe was formed at God’s command, so that what is seen was not made out of what was visible. [‘Understand’ here means “to apply mental effort needed to reach “bottom-line” conclusions:”

        “3539 noiéō (from 3563 /noús, “mind”) – properly, to apply mental effort needed to reach “bottom-line” conclusions. 3539 (noiéō) underlines the moral culpability we all have before God – for every decision (value-judgment) we make. This follows from each of us being created in the divine image – hence, possessing the inherent capacity by the Lord to exercise moral reasoning.”
        https://biblehub.com/greek/3539.htm ]

        By faith Abel brought God a better offering than Cain did. [Was fallen Abel unable to do this? No hint of such a thing! Did God tell Cain ‘sorry I didn’t make you alive so you couldn’t bring a better offering? No, he told Cain he would be accepted if he did what was right, and cautioned Cain to rule over his sinful desires.] By faith he was commended as righteous, when God spoke well of his offerings. And by faith Abel still speaks, even though he is dead. By faith Enoch was taken from this life, so that he did not experience death: “He could not be found, because God had taken him away.” For before he was taken, he was commended as one who pleased God. And without faith it is impossible to please God, because anyone who comes to him must believe that he exists and that he rewards those who earnestly seek him.[Note the parallel again – faith is believing God exists and trusting in His promises/assurances.] By faith Noah, when warned about things not yet seen, in holy fear built an ark to save his family. By his faith he condemned the world and became heir of the righteousness that is in keeping with faith.”

        Etc. The whole chapter is about how we need faith to come to God and please Him. Nothing in the chapter states or implies that faith is required to have faith, that morally reasoning about God’s testimony and promises is impossible for fallen man, that the ancients simply couldn’t act in faith and neither can we, etc.

        Romans 8, again, context! It isn’t saying those in the flesh cannot repent and turn to God in faith.

        “Therefore, there is now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus, because through Christ Jesus the law of the Spirit who gives life has set you a free from the law of sin and death. For what the law was powerless to do because it was weakened by the flesh, God did by sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh to be a sin offering. And so he condemned sin in the flesh, in order that the righteous requirement of the law might be fully met in us, who do not live according to the flesh but according to the Spirit.”

        [Believers, those in Christ Jesus, have been set free from the law of sin and death. The law was powerless to do this (save) because the strength of the law (in telling right from wrong) is weakened by the flesh of fallen humans [e.g. humans, even ones that strive to do good, are necessarily tempted at times by the flesh and so stray from the law. But Jesus provided another way: by becoming a sin offering for us, His blood can now effectually cover believers so the requirement of the law (righteousness) can be met in us, as God imputes the righteousness of Christ to the believer. Now, the believer lives according to the Spirit, vs. attempting and failing to live by the law.]

        “Those who live according to the flesh have their minds set on what the flesh desires; but those who live in accordance with the Spirit have their minds set on what the Spirit desires. The mind governed by the flesh is death, but the mind governed by the Spirit is life and peace. The mind governed by the flesh is hostile to God; it does not submit to God’s law, nor can it do so. Those who are in the realm of the flesh cannot please God.”

        [In context, that is all about the flesh being hostile to God and unable to fully keep the law so as to be righteous. Hence, since all fallen humans are lawbreakers, they cannot please God. This does not mean they cannot respond to the gospel in faith so that they THEN can please God, be governed by the Spirit, get new life, etc.]

        “You, however, are not in the realm of the flesh but are in the realm of the Spirit, if indeed the Spirit of God lives in you. And if anyone does not have the Spirit of Christ, they do not belong to Christ. But if Christ is in you, then even though your body is subject to death because of sin, the Spirit gives life because of righteousness. And if the Spirit of him who raised Jesus from the dead is living in you, he who raised Christ from the dead will also give life to your mortal bodies because of e his Spirit who lives in you.”

        [The chapter is contrasting two states: #1 subject to death because of sin by being in the ‘realm of the flesh’ and #2 given life by the indwelling Spirit of God. It isn’t saying one is unable to pass from one state to the other without being given faith. This is pretty much the same argument given in Rom 6:1-14 as well:

        “What shall we say, then? Shall we go on sinning so that grace may increase? By no means! We are those who have died to sin; how can we live in it any longer? Or don’t you know that all of us who were baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into his death? We were therefore buried with him through baptism into death in order that, just as Christ was raised from the dead through the glory of the Father, we too may live a new life. For if we have been united with him in a death like his, we will certainly also be united with him in a resurrection like his. For we know that our old self was crucified with him so that the body ruled by sin might be done away with, a that we should no longer be slaves to sin— because anyone who has died has been set free from sin. Now if we died with Christ, we believe that we will also live with him. For we know that since Christ was raised from the dead, he cannot die again; death no longer has mastery over him. The death he died, he died to sin once for all; but the life he lives, he lives to God. In the same way, count yourselves dead to sin but alive to God in Christ Jesus. Therefore do not let sin reign in your mortal body so that you obey its evil desires. Do not offer any part of yourself to sin as an instrument of wickedness, but rather offer yourselves to God as those who have been brought from death to life; and offer every part of yourself to him as an instrument of righteousness. For sin shall no longer be your master, because you are not under the law, but under grace.”

        To pass from death to life, a person trusts in Christ and the promises of God. The fallen human with faith is “baptized into Christ’s death,” identifying with His burial, and then God raises up the believer to new life just as He raised Jesus from the dead. Then, the person who formerly walked by the flesh can now walk by the indwelling Spirit and “please God” and submit to God.

        The gospel does not effectually convey or “manifest” assurance and conviction. What it does is *testify* of God’s assurances and tell of the death and Resurrection of Christ. Then, as per Heb 11, some perceive/understand (use their moral reasoning) about that testimony and decide that there is indeed enough assurance in the gospel for them to trust in it. Personal testimonies, scripture, nature, the gospel message itself, the conviction of the Spirit regarding sin, etc. – these are all secondary evidences that the gospel is true. But faith is not the same as “sight” – if gospel assurance was effectually applied to some and not others, there would be no faith required!

        Certainly, “not everyone who “hears” the gospel comes to belief in Christ.” But there is no scriptural reason that there must be only one “something” that keeps people from believing, or only one “something” that draws others to believe. Going back to the parable of the sower already mentioned in this discussion, we see several reasons that people did not believe or continue in belief (a hardened path where the seed could not penetrate before being snatched away by Satan; a shallow rocky soil which the seed could penetrate but not have a firm root; a weedy soil where the seed could take root but the plant would be easily choked by cares of the world) – and many other reasons for people not believing are listed in scripture (love of sin, not wanting personal sin to be revealed, unwillingness to have a personal moral savior vs. a physical political one, etc.) And from the many discussions I have had with atheists, I could add “mad at God” or “hurt by a Christian” to that list. That is, even in the cases of some who do believe deep down that God is real and Christ is the Messiah might still refuse because they are blaming God for a past hurt. (In this regard, Calvinists like John Piper who declare that God decreed every hurt and crime ever committed, including the Holocaust or sexual abuse, can be stumbling locks to people like this who are resisting Christ due to hurt.)

        Jesus did often use the phrase “ears to hear” at the end of parables. That’s a reference back to Jeremiah 5 and some other prophecies on Israel becoming dull of hearing, which I suggest be read in it’s entirety. The nation of Israel forsook God, and so God turned them over to exile and captivity by Rome as well as hardening them in part.

        “What then? What Israel was seeking, it failed to obtain, but the elect did. The others were hardened, as it is written: “God gave them a spirit of stupor, eyes that could not see, and ears that could not hear, to this very day.” Rom 11:8

        “…Yet even in those days,” declares the Lord, “I will not destroy you completely. And when the people ask, ‘Why has the Lord our God done all this to us?’ you will tell them, ‘As you have forsaken me and served foreign gods in your own land, so now you will serve foreigners in a land not your own.’ “Announce this to the descendants of Jacob and proclaim it in Judah: Hear this, you foolish and senseless people,
        who have eyes but do not see, who have ears but do not hear: Should you not fear me?” declares the Lord…. But these people have stubborn and rebellious hearts; they have turned aside and gone away. They do not say to themselves, ‘Let us fear the Lord our God, who gives autumn and spring rains in season, who assures us of the regular weeks of harvest.’ Your wrongdoings have kept these away; your sins have deprived you of good. Among my people are the wicked who lie in wait like men who snare birds and like those who set traps to catch people. Like cages full of birds, their houses are full of deceit; they have become rich and powerful and have grown fat and sleek. Their evil deeds have no limit; they do not seek justice. They do not promote the case of the fatherless; they do not defend the just cause of the poor. Should I not punish them for this?” declares the Lord. “Should I not avenge myself on such a nation as this? “A horrible and shocking thing has happened in the land: The prophets prophesy lies, the priests rule by their own authority, and my people love it this way.
        But what will you do in the end?” – Jer 5

        “For this people’s heart has become calloused; they hardly hear with their ears, and they have closed their eyes. Otherwise they might see with their eyes, hear with their ears, understand with their hearts and turn, and I would heal them.'” Acts 28:7

        There are many, many scriptures on the subject of ‘ears to hear.’ But none of them say that God must “give” people ears to hear so that they can hear. Rather, they are references to the nation of Israel which, unlike every other nation on Earth, specifically had a covenant with God. They forsook God, for idolatry, greed, etc. By the time of Christ the Pharisees were using their position for gain and reputation, not to actually help people follow God. God hardened Israel in part due to this. So when Jesus is saying “those who have ears, let them hear” the listeners would have been familiar with Jeremiah. It’s a warning to them that their leaders are not ruling by God’s authority and are leading them astray; that God will soon bring judgement on the nation; and to return to God. That’s a common theme of Jesus’ teaching to the Israelites, specifically: if you were really following God/the scripture/the prophets you would believe me. Your rejection of me shows that you aren’t really following God, Moses, scripture, etc. at all.

        Now, one could get out of that that many in Israel were hardened in their own rebellion (hence the hardened path in the Parable of the Sower,) but one cannot derive from that figurative/prophetic language that every unbeliever in the world has to be *granted* ears to hear. Jesus message is to those who “have” ears, i.e. take stock of what you do know (of God, scripture, etc.) and test/heed what I say in light of that, NOT in light of what your leaders are saying or what you personally hope the Messiah will look like or hope God will do, etc.

        We “enter the kingdom” BY faith, not so that we can then get faith. The person with faith is born again (Rom 6) as they identify with the death of Christ and God raises them to new life and grants them the indwelling Spirit. No one must be born again to get faith.

        Faith -> Born Again (baptism: death to sin + new life by the Spirit) -> adopted as sons, reconciled with God, enter the kingdom, made Holy, conformed to Christ, sanctified, etc.

        We aren’t born again to get/be given faith or anythihng like that. Our new birth is post faith as God graciously unites the believer in the death & Resurrection of Christ, imputes Christ’s righteousness to us, and grants us the indwelling Holy Spirit so we can walk in that newness of life.

      9. Jenai,
        I appreciate your willingness to post so much good stuff.

        In case you did not know…..much of this has been said to him multiple times by multiple people in multiple ways using multiple Bible passages.

        It is GOOD that you are putting it out there for other interested parties to read, but I’m just letting you know that (a) he has seen most of this before and (b) since he is bringing significant presuppositions to the table I dont think he can “hear” or see your logic. It’s a little bit like speaking a different language.

        For us “he is simply choosing to prefer Calvinism” but for him “he has been chosen to say all he says” (woah, so have we for that matter, according to Calvinism!).

      10. I can second that!

        Calvinists may present the impression that they are open minded – but we eventually understand that is not what they are here for.

        And rhutchin has been here for years – so we know exactly what to anticipate.
        He has a few dialog modes which have been labeled over time.
        1) The dancing boxer routine
        2) The greased pig routine
        3) The puppy dog chasing his tail routine
        4) The fake open-minded person routine

        But we all eventually observe the pattern of Double-Speak.
        Calvinists like to present by inference, conceptions that are the logical inverse of dictates specifically asserted by their own doctrine.

      11. Jenai, I would second FOH, and you probably have seen enough to know already, that even here we see evidence of those who do and do not have ears to hear. 😉 Those who do not, will not understand, even if God takes on flesh and speaks to them in person.

        Nevertheless, I am personally encouraged and informed by your very capable and well-presented messages, so I hope that you will continue to post them!

      12. JR: “The whole chapter is about how we need faith to come to God and please Him.”

        Agreed as well as your analysis leading up to this point. By “we,” I take you to mean unsaved humanity unless you meant, “We believers needed faith to come to God (i.e., to believe in Christ/call Him Lord.).”

        Then, “Nothing in the chapter states or implies that faith is required to have faith, that morally reasoning about God’s testimony and promises is impossible for fallen man, that the ancients simply couldn’t act in faith and neither can we, etc.”

        The chapter is silent on unbelievers; it deals with the faith of believers. However, elsewhere, we see that faith is necessary to salvation. As you say earlier, “we need faith to come to God.” and “Faith comes by hearing.” I think this says that people are not born with faith and until a person receives faith, he cannot come to God. As the verse says, “without faith it is impossible to please Him,” and presuming that “coming to God” pleases Him, we can draw reasonable conclusions about the unsaved who have no faith.

        Later, you say, ‘”Then, as per Heb 11, some perceive/understand (use their moral reasoning) about that testimony and decide that there is indeed enough assurance in the gospel for them to trust in it. Personal testimonies, scripture, nature, the gospel message itself, the conviction of the Spirit regarding sin, etc. – these are all secondary evidences that the gospel is true. But faith is not the same as “sight” – if gospel assurance was effectually applied to some and not others, there would be no faith required! ”

        You say, “and decide that there is indeed enough assurance in the gospel for them to trust in it.” This is wrong. Faith is assurance and conviction; Faith comes by hearing.. One who “hears” the gospel has assurance/conviction – more than enough to trust in Christ/submit to Christ as Lord. Some people receive faith, some do not.

        Then, ‘But there is no scriptural reason that there must be only one “something” that keeps people from believing, or only one “something” that draws others to believe.”

        OK – but there is a “something” however simple or complex that would explain it. There are many excuses people offer to refuse to believe the gospel. However, some people do believe and they probably have the same excuses. So, we both agree that “something” explains why some believe in Christ and some do not. At this point, you have offered some excuses that you think comprise this “something” for unbelievers. As a Calvinist, I say that something is God for believers.

        Then, ‘There are many, many scriptures on the subject of ‘ears to hear.’ But none of them say that God must “give” people ears to hear so that they can hear.”

        OK. We now need to explain why some have “ears to hear” and some do not. You do not explain what you think accounts for this. Again, as a Calvinist, I say that God gives some “ears to hear” and not others.

        Then, “one cannot derive from that figurative/prophetic language (of the parable) that every unbeliever in the world has to be *granted* ears to hear.”

        I see that one might suspect strongly such to be the case and draw a reasonable conclusion based on everything else we read in the Scripture.

        Then, “We “enter the kingdom” BY faith, not so that we can then get faith….No one must be born again to get faith.”

        John 3 says that one must be born again to enter the kingdom. You add that one must be born again and have faith to enter the kingdom (i.e., be saved). Which comes first must be fleshed out. The Calvinist would point to Ephesians 2 where God makes the unsaved alive and conclude that being born again precedes faith. Regardless if one is unsaved and “hears” the gospel thereby receiving faith whereupon they are born again, it would seem to deny what Jesus said, “The wind blows where it wishes and you hear the sound of it, but do not know where it comes from and where it is going; so is everyone who is born of the Spirit.” You seem to be saying that faith makes the born again experience automatic and predictable.

        I’ll comment on your Romans analysis later.

      13. JR: “Romans 8…isn’t saying those in the flesh cannot repent and turn to God in faith”

        In your analysis of Hebrews, you said, “we need faith to come to God.” Unless you are parsing “turn to” to distinguish it from “come to,” you seem to be going both ways on this. Can you clarify what you believe? I see the point being that those in the flesh (the unsaved) require faith in order to repent and turn to God. Paul contrasts being in the flesh with being in the Spirit with no middle ground. It is because the believer is indwell by the Spirit that he no longer is ruled by the flesh (even though influenced as Romans 7 explains). As you say, “The chapter is contrasting two states: #1 subject to death because of sin by being in the ‘realm of the flesh’ and #2 given life by the indwelling Spirit of God.”

        Then, “The chapter is contrasting two states: #1 subject to death because of sin by being in the ‘realm of the flesh’ and #2 given life by the indwelling Spirit of God. It isn’t saying one is unable to pass from one state to the other without being given faith. “

        While Paul does not state explicitly that faith is needed start by saying, “There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus.” In Galatians, Paul wrote, “Christ redeemed us from the curse of the Law, having become a curse for us…so that we might receive the promise of the Spirit through faith….For you are all sons of God through faith in Christ Jesus.” So, we can read Romans 8:1 as “There is therefore now no condemnation for those who [through faith] are in Christ Jesus.” In the Calvinist system, faith is critical to the transformation from being unsaved to saved. You seem to be distancing yourself from Calvinism by arguing against that role for faith. Are you?

        Then, “Believers, those in Christ Jesus, have been set free from the law of sin and death…Hence, since all fallen humans are lawbreakers, they cannot please God. This does not mean they cannot respond to the gospel in faith so that they THEN can please God, be governed by the Spirit, get new life, etc.”

        This is a key disagreement with Calvinism. Calvinism says that the unsaved can only respond to the gospel with faith. That is why the unsaved, who lack faith, cannot be saved by their own efforts and are Total Depravity/Total Inability. Hebrews is key here for the Calvinist, “…without faith it is impossible to please God, for he who comes to God must believe that He is, and that He is a rewarder of those who seek Him.”

        Then, ‘To pass from death to life, a person trusts in Christ and the promises of God…Then, the person who formerly walked by the flesh can now walk by the indwelling Spirit and “please God” and submit to God.”

        In Ephesians 1, Paul writes, “In Him, you also, after listening to the message of truth, the gospel of your salvation–having also believed, you were sealed in Him with the Holy Spirit of promise,…” So the unsaved listens to the gospel and consequently believes and then is indwell by the Holy Spirit that then provides him the ability to please God. So where does faith fit into this? In Acts, we read, “some days later, Felix arrived with Drusilla, his wife who was a Jewess, and sent for Paul, and heard him speak about faith in Christ Jesus.” In Galatians, “…a man is not justified by the works of the Law but through faith in Christ Jesus,…” Earlier in Romans, “Christ who was delivered up because of our transgressions, and was raised because of our justification. Therefore having been justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom also we have obtained our introduction by faith into this grace in which we stand;”

        As Paul describes those in the flesh “…the mind set on the flesh is hostile toward God;” he here speaks of having peace with God through faith. The bottom line is that Calvinism says that faith is necessary to salvation and precedes any other act of the person (i.e., “….walk by the indwelling Spirit and “please God” and submit to God.”) I understand you to be arguing against this position.

        As FOH wrote, “In case you did not know…..much of this has been said to him multiple times by multiple people in multiple ways using multiple Bible passages. It is GOOD that you are putting it out there for other interested parties to read, but I’m just letting you know that (a) he has seen most of this before and (b) since he is bringing significant presuppositions to the table I don’t think he can “hear” or see your logic. It’s a little bit like speaking a different language.” So, we see the distinction that the Calvinist makes with regard to faith and that which you, FOH, br.d and others make. If nothing else, the battle lines have been drawn once again.

      14. “Can you clarify what you believe? I see the point being that those in the flesh (the unsaved) require faith in order to repent and turn to God.”

        In Heb 11 it doesn’t say faith is required to respond to the gospel in faith or that faith is first required to repent and turn to God. Rather, it specifically states that faith is required to please God (which in context of the passage is to satisfy His requirement of righteousness, hence why God “credited” righteousness to those who believed God’s promises and acted on that faith. The entire chapter explores why faith is necessary to please God, using examples of people who trusted God’s promises, treating them as certain even when they did not personally see the fulfillment of them, and acted on that trust.

        Logical premises of the form, “A is required for B” do not mandate that “A is necessary to get A” – that would be nonsensical.

        Furthermore, Paul is writing Heb 11 to believers. The point of listing all these faithful followers of God from the OT is so that believers will not grow weary when they do not see God’s promises immediately fulfilled (Heb 11:39-40, Heb 12:1-3.) He isn’t saying, “Be glad you are among those specially chosen to have 100% assurance effectually conveyed to you, congrats you elect, you’ll never struggle or doubt at all!” No, he is telling them that they will face hardship, struggle, and adversity. They will not all immediately see the promises fulfilled. So, we should look to the examples of men of old who trusted even when the first coming of Christ was a long way off to encourage us to trust even when the second coming of Christ could be a long way off! We have certainty that the promise of His Second Coming is assured because we can look at His First Coming which was trusted by people living thousands of years before it happened. We can trust that the promises of God are assured because of His character, even when things seem slow by our standards.

        ” Paul contrasts being in the flesh with being in the Spirit with no middle ground.”

        For one, it is a logical fallacy (Specifically, the “fallacy of the excluded middle”) to automatically assume that when someone presents two contrasting states that there is no middle ground. For an example, imagine someone is describing living in the city vs. living in the country. Does that automatically mean that no one can live in the suburbs, or commute between the two? Etc. Unfortunately, Calvinism seems to do this a lot – presenting two extremes as if there is no middle option or no transition between stages.

        In the case of being in the flesh being in the Spirit, there isn’t much of a middle ground but there is one: the *transition* from death to life that happens when a believer first responds in faith and God graciously raises them to new life. Temporally, this basically happens in an instant. Col 2, Rom 6, and other passages detail this transition which is often summarized in the term “baptism” – passing from death to life.

        “And you have been made complete in Christ, who is the head over every ruler and authority. In Him you were also circumcised in the putting off of your sinful nature, with the circumcision performed by Christ and not by human hands. And having been buried with Him in baptism, you were raised with Him through your faith in the power of God, who raised Him from the dead. When you were dead in your trespasses and in the uncircumcision of your sinful nature, God made you alive with Christ. He forgave us all our trespasses, having canceled the debt ascribed to us in the decrees that stood against us. He took it away, nailing it to the cross! And having disarmed the powers and authorities, He made a public spectacle of them, triumphing over them by the cross.”
        Col 2:10-15

        Here is the sequence:

        1. Initial state: dead in trespasses
        2. Person has faith in the power of God
        3. Buried with Christ in baptism (Circumcised by Christ/Put off sin nature)
        4. God raises believer (makes believer alive with Christ)
        5. New state: Alive in Christ; forgiven; complete in Christ.

        This transition (baptism, death to life) is the ‘middle ground’ and is an essential part of soteriology. Baptism is how God makes us alive, how God initiates us into the New Covenant, how our old sin nature is put off and the righteous garments of Christ put on, etc.

        ” It is because the believer is indwell by the Spirit that he no longer is ruled by the flesh (even though influenced as Romans 7 explains).”

        Agreed. The believer puts ‘off’ the flesh in baptism (which really is Christ ‘circumcizing’ the believer, not the believers own power or action) and then God raises the believer to new life and gives the indwelling Spirit. So the *believer* is no longer ruled by the flesh.

        “While Paul does not state explicitly that faith is needed start by saying, “There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus.” In Galatians, Paul wrote, “Christ redeemed us from the curse of the Law, having become a curse for us…so that we might receive the promise of the Spirit through faith….For you are all sons of God through faith in Christ Jesus.” So, we can read Romans 8:1 as “There is therefore now no condemnation for those who [through faith] are in Christ Jesus.” In the Calvinist system, faith is critical to the transformation from being unsaved to saved. You seem to be distancing yourself from Calvinism by arguing against that role for faith. Are you?”

        Of course faith is critical for the transformation from unsaved to saved. That’s been a large portion of my replies to you, as you seem to be saying that we need to be born again and given faith so that we can then repent and believe. But scripture shows the unsaved person that responds to the gospel in faith is THEN circumcised by Christ and made alive (born again) by God by God’s gracious choice to save believers and credit righteousness to them.

        Note the actual text of Gal 3:14 which you quote from:

        “He redeemed us in order that the blessing given to Abraham might come to the Gentiles through Christ Jesus, so that by faith we might receive the promise of the Spirit.” Gal 3:14

        Do we receive faith so that we might be redeemed? Do we receive the Spirit so we may receive faith? No, through faith we receive (actively lay hold of, aggressively accept what is offered https://biblehub.com/greek/2983.htm) the promise of the Spirit. Jesus paid the redemption price as our Kinsman Redeemer so that anyone can, through faith, actively lay hold of the promise of the Spirit. The rest of the chapter just backs this up: the righteous live by faith, all those with faith are children of Abraham, we must rely on faith and not the law, etc.

        “This is a key disagreement with Calvinism. Calvinism says that the unsaved can only respond to the gospel with faith. That is why the unsaved, who lack faith, cannot be saved by their own efforts and are Total Depravity/Total Inability. Hebrews is key here for the Calvinist, “…without faith it is impossible to please God, for he who comes to God must believe that He is, and that He is a rewarder of those who seek Him.”

        All of Christianity, not just Calvinists, believe that the unsaved cannot be saved by their own efforts. Calvinist does not say the unsaved “can only respond to the gospel with faith” – that’s opposite the Calvinist theory of Total Inability which claims the unsaved “CANNOT” or is “inable/unable” to respond to the gospel in faith. The Calvinist view of Total Depravity is not merely that man is unable to be saved of his own efforts or work of the law, but that fallen man is unable to respond to the gospel in faith. Since you are not representing Calvinism correctly, there isn’t much more I can say here. But if you do indeed believe that any unsaved person can respond to the gospel in faith (without being among the select few being ‘born again’ prior or effectually given faith, etc.) then you are not a Calvinist.

        “In Ephesians 1, Paul writes, “In Him, you also, after listening to the message of truth, the gospel of your salvation–having also believed, you were sealed in Him with the Holy Spirit of promise,…” So the unsaved listens to the gospel and consequently believes and then is indwell by the Holy Spirit that then provides him the ability to please God. So where does faith fit into this?”

        The Greek word pístis can be translated either faith or belief – they are synonyms. The Greek word pisteuó can be translated either believing or ‘have faith in’ – again, synonyms.

        The unsaved person who hears the gospel and believes (verb) holds faith (noun.) Those who hold faith believe. Those who believe have faith.

        “For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.” Jn 3:16

        It’s worth noting that believing is not a one time action, but an ongoing state. Those who actively believe actively hold faith.

        “But now apart from the law the righteousness of God has been made known, to which the Law and the Prophets testify. This righteousness is given through faith in Jesus Christ to all who believe. There is no difference between Jew and Gentile, for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God, and all are justified freely by his grace through the redemption that came by Christ Jesus. God presented Christ as a sacrifice of atonement, i through the shedding of his blood—to be received by faith. He did this to demonstrate his righteousness, because in his forbearance he had left the sins committed beforehand unpunished— he did it to demonstrate his righteousness at the present time, so as to be just and the one who justifies those who have faith in Jesus. Where, then, is boasting? It is excluded. Because of what law? The law that requires works? No, because of the law that requires faith. For we maintain that a person is justified by faith apart from the works of the law. Or is God the God of Jews only? Is he not the God of Gentiles too? Yes, of Gentiles too, since there is only one God, who will justify the circumcised by faith and the uncircumcised through that same faith. Do we, then, nullify the law by this faith? Not at all! Rather, we uphold the law.” Rom 3:21-31

        God didn’t make people follow the law. In the same way, He doesn’t make some people have faith. Rather, faith is a person’s response in trust to God’s persuasion. In other ancient writings, pistis stood for a guarantee or warranty. The New Covenant in Christ’s blood is the guarantee of God’s promises – but one has to enter that Covenant by faith to accept that guarantee. If a man guarantees that his heirs will receive a billion dollars each, that does nothing for those who are not heirs. We are all heirs through faith.

        “Jesus answered, “Very truly I tell you, you are looking for me, not because you saw the signs I performed but because you ate the loaves and had your fill. Do not work for food that spoils, but for food that endures to eternal life, which the Son of Man will give you. For on him God the Father has placed his seal of approval.” Then they asked him, “What must we do to do the works God requires?” Jesus answered, “The work of God is this: to believe in the one he has sent.” So they asked him, “What sign then will you give that we may see it and believe you? What will you do? Our ancestors ate the manna in the wilderness; as it is written: ‘He gave them bread from heaven to eat.’ Jesus said to them, “Very truly I tell you, it is not Moses who has given you the bread from heaven, but it is my Father who gives you the true bread from heaven. For the bread of God is the bread that comes down from heaven and gives life to the world.”“Sir,” they said, “always give us this bread.” Then Jesus declared, “I am the bread of life. Whoever comes to me will never go hungry, and whoever believes in me will never be thirsty. But as I told you, you have seen me and still you do not believe. All those the Father gives me will come to me, and whoever comes to me I will never drive away. For I have come down from heaven not to do my will but to do the will of him who sent me. And this is the will of him who sent me, that I shall lose none of all those he has given me, but raise them up at the last day. For my Father’s will is that everyone who looks to the Son and believes in him shall have eternal life, and I will raise them up at the last day.”
        John 6:30-40

        Note a few things:
        – Believing in Christ is something man must ‘do’ in a sense. This is not described as a work of the law (as we know from other passages it certainly is not) but is likened to eating offered bread; trusting in that which God has provided.
        – The Father chooses to let anyone with faith come to Christ
        – The Father’s will is that anyone who looks to the Son and believes will be raised on the last day (parallel here to “looking” at the snake on a pole and being healed, and to Christ being lifted up so as to draw all men)
        – Seeing the proof right in front of you is not sufficient of itself to make someone believe

        ” In Acts, we read, “some days later, Felix arrived with Drusilla, his wife who was a Jewess, and sent for Paul, and heard him speak about faith in Christ Jesus.” In Galatians, “…a man is not justified by the works of the Law but through faith in Christ Jesus,…” Earlier in Romans, “Christ who was delivered up because of our transgressions, and was raised because of our justification. Therefore having been justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom also we have obtained our introduction by faith into this grace in which we stand;”

        I am not sure what your point is here. That faith can be used as either a noun or a verb? Sure. But these scriptures are harmonious, not contradictory. Whoever *believes* in Christ is saved. We can rightly say then that we are saved “by grace, and through faith.”

        Look at the context of the verses you briefly reference:

        “Several days later Felix came with his wife Drusilla, who was Jewish. He sent for Paul and listened to him as he spoke about faith in Christ Jesus. As Paul talked about righteousness, self-control and the judgment to come, Felix was afraid and said, “That’s enough for now! You may leave. When I find it convenient, I will send for you.” At the same time he was hoping that Paul would offer him a bribe, so he sent for him frequently and talked with him.” Acts 24:24-26

        Was Paul speaking about a faith that would be effectually granted to some and not to others? No, he was talking about the faith in general: topics such as Christ, righteousness, self-control, judgement, etc. Feli was not unfamiliar with the topic, and his Jewish wife could presumably also shed light on the topic. That he was “frightened” showed he even had some conviction of conscience – at some level he feared, or even knew, that what Paul was saying was true. But Felix resisted personally believing because “he was hoping Paul would offer him a bribe” – not because “God didn’t effectually grant Felix faith.”

        “The bottom line is that Calvinism says that faith is necessary to salvation and precedes any other act of the person (i.e., “….walk by the indwelling Spirit and “please God” and submit to God.”) I understand you to be arguing against this position.”

        Of course faith is necessary to salvation and precedes the walk of the believer with God, sanctification, etc. But the Calvinist position is that man CANNOT have faith upon hearing the gospel (they are split on the solution. Prior regeneration, simply being given faith (not even from the person in that view, Christ’s faith being effectually applied to the person, irresistible proof given, etc.). You are assuming that rejection of the theory of Total Inability must somehow mandate rejection of the idea that God only grants salvation to those who believe in Christ – and there is no logical basis to claim that.

        “We see the distinction that the Calvinist makes with regard to faith and that which you, FOH, br.d and others make. If nothing else, the battle lines have been drawn once again.”

        No, you just have claimed without basis that “no one else” believes faith is necessary for salvation as if that is the “battle line” – even though everyone agrees faith is necessary for salvation. The “battle line” remains the theory of Total Inability, which you have as yet to support as necessary to scripture, and has of yet to respond to the many, many points and scriptures given that contradict it. Moving the goal posts and flitting around to other out-of-context scriptures rather than confronting verses in context is not the same as supporting a theory.

      15. Jenai
        Logical premises of the form, “A is required for B” do not mandate that “A is necessary to get A” – that would be nonsensical.

        br.d
        I LOVED this statement!!

        And the irony about this is – that is exactly the way Calvinist thinking works.

        Theological Determinism (first conceived by the Greek STOICS) presupposes a MODEL of causation where sequential events occur in a “CAUSAL CHAIN” leading back to a SOURCE/ORIGIN.

        However don’t waste your time trying to LOGICALLY walk a Calvinist back to the SOURCE/ORIGIN of his doctrine’s CAUSAL CHAIN.

        The ORIGINATOR, DESIGNER, SUSTAINER, and CONTROLLER of every movement of every link in the chain is Calvin’s god.

        So when it comes to evil events – the closer you try to walk the Calvinist back to the SOURCE/ORIGIN – the more *TERRIFIED* he gets! And for understandable reasons.

        And that’s why he will argue that “A is necessary to get A”

      16. JR: “In Heb 11 it doesn’t say faith is required to respond to the gospel in faith…”

        It says, “without faith it is impossible to please God,…” – This is an universal truth applicable across to any situation. If one desires to please, God, he must first have faith..

        But then, “for he who comes to God must believe…” The issue here is to discern the relationship between ‘believe” and “faith.” It seems reasonable to conclude that believing God is one way to please God. Given that faith is required to please God, we can conclude that faith precedes and provides the basis for believing. As responding to the gospel must please God, we can say that faith precedes a favorable response to the gospel.

        What we seem to have here is a definition of faith : Faith is “[believing] that God is, and that He is a rewarder of those who seek Him.” Faith and belief are separate concepts but one never appears without the other.

        So, is faith required to repent of one’s sin against God and turn to God. Something must excite a person to turn away from his sinful life. In Romans 10, Paul says, “the righteousness that is by faith…what does it say? “The word is near you; it is in your mouth and in your heart,” that is, the word of faith we are proclaiming:” So, in Acts, “when [Paul and Barnabas] had arrived and gathered the church together, they began to report all things that God had done with them and how He had opened a door of faith to the Gentiles.” Paul preaches the word of faith and a door of faith is opened to unbelievers. Certainly faith is proclaimed to unbelievers and faith works on the unbelievers and then they respond in to that preaching in repentance acceptance of the gospel. I don’t see how faith can be excluded as a prime mover in driving people to God and Christ.

        Then, “For one, it is a logical fallacy (Specifically, the “fallacy of the excluded middle”)…Unfortunately, Calvinism seems to do this a lot – presenting two extremes as if there is no middle option or no transition between stages.”

        If you find where the Scriptures identify a middle ground between the flesh and the Spirit, I will yield on this point. Until then, I will maintain that there is no middle ground. It may be true that Calvinists present things as black or white, and I suspect that they do this because the scriptures do not allow for a gray middle. If this is a weakness in Calvinism, you are free to exploit it. Your example of baptism does not define a middle ground between flesh and spirit but illustrates the change from flesh to spirit. Colossians says, “God delivered us from the domain of darkness, and transferred us to the kingdom of His beloved Son, in whom we have redemption, the forgiveness of sins.” There is no middle ground here – we were in darkness and then we were in light. Again, “When you were dead in your trespasses and in the uncircumcision of your sinful nature, God made you alive with Christ.” We were dead; then we were alive. There was no middle ground.

        But you argue, “This transition (baptism, death to life) is the ‘middle ground’ and is an essential part of soteriology. Baptism is how God makes us alive,”

        Paul is giving us an an illustration and that which God accomplished to save us. Christ circumcised the believer separating him form his sin nature, God buried the believer in Christ. the believer then hears the gospel preached and with the faith derived form the gospel, he finds himself raised to new life. Wrapping this up, Paul says, “When you were dead in your trespasses and in the uncircumcision of your sinful nature, God made you alive with Christ.” In Ephesians, “You are saved through faith.” If you want “the ‘transition’ from death to life that happens when a believer first responds in faith” then I am fine with that as it puts faith in it’s proper place – the response in faith being calling on God to be saved. Thus we are saved by grace through faith.

        Then, “Of course faith is critical for the transformation from unsaved to saved. That’s been a large portion of my replies to you, as you seem to be saying that we need to be born again and given faith so that we can then repent and believe.”

        John 3 seems definitive to me – one must be born again in order to see and enter the kingdom (i.e., be saved). Being born again necessarily precedes and makes salvation possible. Having been born again, the preaching of the gospel becomes effective – faith comes by hearing. The ability to “see” and “enter” makes possible the ability to “hear.” We will just have to disagree on this and let it differentiate me as a Calvinist and you as a non-Calvinist.

        Then, “Do we receive faith so that we might be redeemed?” No, we were redeemed first and then those redeemed received faith through the gospel.
        Then, “Do we receive the Spirit so we may receive faith?” No, “after listening to the message of truth, the gospel of your salvation [so that by faith we might receive the promise of the Spirit.]–having also believed, you were sealed in Christ with the Holy Spirit of promise,”

        Then, “that’s opposite the Calvinist theory of Total Inability which claims the unsaved “CANNOT” or is “inable/unable” to respond to the gospel in faith.”

        No, it is, “…that’s opposite the Calvinist theory of Total Inability which claims the unsaved “CANNOT” or is “inable/unable” to respond to the gospel EXCEPT in faith. Total Inability is undone by faith as faith is Total ability. But you say, “Since you are not representing Calvinism correctly, there isn’t much more I can say here.” I am pretty sure that I have it right and it is you who have misrepresented Calvinism. Nowhere have I heard of a Calvinist saying that a person is unable to respond to the gospel in faith. Rather, the Calvinist says that faith is required for a person to respond to the gospel.

        More later.

      17. Jenai:

        I am not tracking all of the back-and-forth with you and RH (as I mentioned I dont dialog with him since he just goes ’round and ’round in illogical circles). But I happened to glance at this one he wrote:

        “If you find where the Scriptures identify a middle ground between the flesh and the Spirit, I will yield on this point. Until then, I will maintain that there is no middle ground. It may be true that Calvinists present things as black or white, and I suspect that they do this because the scriptures do not allow for a gray middle.”

        All of Calvinism is based on this black-n-white idea that EVERYTHING is flesh before (their) “regeneration” (dead, incapable, foolishness, etc) and NOTHING is flesh afterward.

        Of course Scripture does not bear this out as (Calvinist) Piper declares over and over in this article
        https://www.desiringgod.org/messages/the-war-within-flesh-versus-spirit

        Once again…. more waffling on the part of Piper and RH. The promise of “show me a middle ground and I will yield” will never be kept by him. There will be some convoluted “we never answered” retort. Whatever.

        Dead to Calvinists means dead….except when it doesnt. We are dead in Christ and dead to sin, but we sin and struggle with the flesh (which is black-n-white “over with” right?). Inconsistent. Illogical. Unbiblical.

        Good News! Listen world….You are dead and incapable of hearing the Gospel message!

        Good News! Listen church….You are dead to sin…but will struggle with the flesh your whole life.

      18. Ah, we both know the Calvinist cannot afford to concede a single point. It isn’t really that they are incapable of following logic, but that they cannot uphold their system apart from twisted, convoluted detours in hopes of keeping their inconsistencies from being exposed. Even when someone as logical and literate as Jenai points out the obvious holes in his arguments. RH really has no choice but to pretend like he doesn’t see that his arguments leak like a sieve.

        We’ve seen it hundreds of times: deny, deflect, rephrase, mock, challenge, call names. It is either that or admit the inescapable flaws in his system, which he has no intention of ever doing. Most, I would wager, come here with an earnest desire to re-examine important issues. Many have never heard a well thought out counter to the teachings of Calvinism.

        They can benefit from the insights of those who can see scripture from the Calvinist, non-Calvinist and anti-Calvinist perspectives. It is only when the alternatives are made known that people are able to be freed from the confines of a hideous and unsatisfying view of God. That is the beauty of this blog.

      19. Exactly correct!

        Calvin’s institutes of square-circles and married bachelors.
        The system is intrinsically irrational.

        SEMANTIC arguments – equivocations – and duplicitous inferential language is its strong suit.
        What is boldly asserted as TRUE or FALSE with one hand – is later SNUCK BACK with the other hand.
        Double-Think hidden within a smoke-screen of inferential language.

        That’s why Dr. Jerry Walls likens Calvinists to magicians.

        Semantic shell-games are an integral a part of the tradition.
        And the way it chooses to maintain an APPEARANCE of coherence.

      20. br.d:
        “And the way it chooses to maintain an APPEARANCE of coherence.”

        With ‘appearance’ being the key.

        I recall, in my first excursion into examining Calvinism, about 20 years ago, reading that the Calvinist TULIP had a certain internal logic. As long as one accepts the foundational concept of Total Depravity, or Inability, the remaining points are a logical outflow. Indeed, so interdependent are they that to remove even one of the petals is to destroy the illusion of a flower.

        Hence the fierce struggle to fend off the many and sound logical objections to various points. Total Depravity, meaning a walking corpse kind of ‘dead in sin’ is a severe and unjustified reading of scripture. Repeated calls from God to man, commands to righteousness and promises of positive responses from God to our mustard seed faith render such a reading nonsensical.

        The absurdity of the claim that God would deliberately blind and bind his creation to sin, rendering them helpless and hopeless, belittles the marvelous work of grace he undertook to redeem men from such a state. Or leaves him in the belittling state of causing problems so that he can solve them.

        Raised a non-Calvinist, I had never heard such a definition, and I laughed at the absurdity of it from the start. Not to mention my own personal experience with God, which belied such a false theory. My problem was that I did not realize, early on, that I could not toss off whichever tenets of Calvinism I found false and expect what was left to remain on solid ground.

        Even though I had read thousands of pages on Calvinism, I later discovered that the strategy of focusing on Calvinism vs. Arminianism tends to distract from fully investigating and understanding the base claims of the Calvinist system. One can knock down strawmen for decades before discovering they are not real, without getting to the root of the issues. A very clever strategy, that.

        It is literally impossible to speak and live as if Total Depravity, and its stepchild – Determinism – genuinely exist. Not a Calvinist preacher I have ever heard or read speaks as if either really exist. Instead they appeal to men to believe in God (or at least Calvinism), embrace their system, warn of the dangers of straying from it, encourage prayer and sanctification, all as if such things were possible by dead, completely controlled men and women.

        They were forced, in recent times, to invent the oxymoron known as Compatibilism, claiming that God’s predetermination of whatsoever comes to pass and its antithesis, man’s free choice, are at the same time true. Utterly impossible, and yet this is the smoke they must blow to cover the problem of their system making God the author and source of abuse, oppression, injustice and all evil.

        Has any Calvinist pastor honestly spoke as his system demands, asserting, ‘If you are elect, wait and see if God regenerates you so that you can see the glorious truth of what I am saying’? Do any declare, ‘Of course it will change nothing, since God has ordained all things in eternity past, but let us pray together, as God has commanded us to go through this pointless drill’? Do any, when approached by frantic parents, concerned about a particular sin or struggle of their child, assert, ‘There is no use worrying about it; if God wants him to be addicted to pornography, or become a serial killer, that is what will come to pass. We must accept God’s decrees and give him glory for them.’?

        I would assert that not only do pastors not speak as their system logically demands, they do not even think consistently Calvinistically. They somehow do not see the disconnect between what they claim to be true and how they actually think, speak and live every day. I only saw it when I studied the system and tried to understand how to logically, consistently apply it. I saw that it could not be done, without turning God into a monster or me into a lunatic.

        This is why atheists, many of who hold Calvinism as essential Christianity, so loudly guffaw at such a perverse, illogical belief system. This too, I once did not understand. I share their incredulous query, ‘Who could possibly believe such things?’ But, having been on the inside for a number of years, I no longer think many people actually do believe ‘such things’. They either have not examined the system closely, or have embraced, unthinkingly, the non-solutions they have been led to believe make it all possible:

        God is the sole source of whatsoever comes to pass, and man can be justly punished for what he has ordained.

        God both ordains whatsoever comes to pass in eternity past, and man is capable of, and culpable for his own actions as if they were freely chosen.

        God constantly commands men to do his will, obey his commands and turn from unrighteousness, while, unknown to the average man, making this entirely impossible until and unless he does a supernatural magic trick and makes a select few once again able.

        God loves mankind, but deliberately set out to condemn and/or destroy most of them.

        God is good, yet brought evil into existence because he longed for ‘glory’.

        These are a few of the troubling conundrums of Calvinism, which for the most part are ignored, denied or papered over with explanations that do not hold water. But if people really want to believe, for any number of reasons, this is enough to provide plausible cover, particularly when coupled with the charge to trust their ‘authorities’.

      21. TS00,
        Wow. Once again you are laying this out so clearly! Couple of affirmative comments:

        1. Indeed. I have said many times that it all hinges (is founded on) Total Depravity. If you START with TD as a presupposition…. (based on the faulty, presupposed interpretations of “flesh/spirit” or “‘dead’ = incapable,” or “gospel is foolishness”) then you must come up with the other 4 petals.

        2. Indeed. No one lives like determinism is true. We all think that we matter, that we make a difference. A longer time spent with our kids doing homework brings a better outcome. We know that to be true. Resisting evil: A little bad internet indiscretion leads to more, and then to porn, and to addiction and we know that is not God’s will (except for Calvinist-Determinists for whom it is “really must have been God’s sovereign will” to be addicted to porn).

        3. Compatibalism: If they had not come up with that, they would not have been able to fit into the greater evangelical community. I have heard card-carrying Calvinists say the most Arminian things: “strategies for winning the lost,” “prayer will change the outcome,” “how will they hear about Christ if you young people do not rise up and go?” “C’mon people, where is your faith?” etc etc etc. It just goes on and on. This allows them to function in the real world, since speaking like a Determinist (or living their theology) would really put them on the fringe.

        To this point, I have literally heard YRR friends of mine say “I believe, FOH, that it is 100% true that God decreed and decided all things before time, and also that compatibly He gives free will to men and makes them responsible. It is beyond our comprehension, but true.” So theology on the first part, and practical living/ actions/ prayers on the second part. Again, in practicality that makes them absolutely no different than any of us (except for their impugning of God’s character).

        4. Conundrums: To add to the list of conundrums: My Bible reading yesterday included John 20, which includes 20:31.

        “But these are written that you may believe that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God, and that by believing you may have life in his name.”

        The double conundrum here is
        (1) “These are written that you may believe” along with all the “convince” “reason with” “persuade” and “choose for yourselves this day” verses are all a hideous mockery if Determinism is true. Calvinism makes it looks like God is only pretending to make this offer to people.
        (2) Ironically the verse also says “by believing you may have life” —- but Calvinists’ “regeneration precedes faith” gives life BEFORE believing.

        But….. let it be known…… no matter what we say, we will hear back “you dont understand Calvinism” and “you are just setting up straw men” or “you are a semi-Polynesian” or “you are a universalist” ” or “you have a man-centered Gospel.”

        Same old same old.

      22. Jenai,
        Please take not that even when goaded, I will not respond to RH. Not because I cannot, but because every one of his repetitive, ’round and ’round accusations has been answer many, many times by me and many others on this blog. It is just senseless to let him goad us with the “FOH doesnt have an answer” or “FOH doesnt believe the Scriptures” lines.

      23. FOH
        Jenai,
        Please take not that even when goaded, I will not respond to RH. Not because I cannot, but because every one of his repetitive, ’round and ’round

        br.d
        Correct – goading is part of rhutchin’s dancing boxer routine.
        Its a total waste of time entertaining it.

      24. With that said, I do understand why Jenai has stayed with it (and I have enjoyed her comments!!), because this is a string on her original article.

      25. Yes you are correct!
        I definitely agree – just not to get lured by the “goading” routine.

      26. “OH writes, ” I have said many times that it all hinges (is founded on) Total Depravity. If you START with TD as a presupposition….”
        FOH knows better. TD begins with the Scriptural truth that people are not born with faith and cannot receive faith except through the word. Without faith, a person has zero ability to be saved. In addition, people are without righteousness – there is none righteous, no not one – and until people receive faith, they cannot be made righteous. Thus, people are Totally Depraved (“…the wickedness of man was great on the earth, and that every intent of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually.”) – and would be Utterly Depraved if God did not restrain them. FOH being unable to argue against the Scriptures can only advance his false views by ignoring those Scriptures.”

        JTL,

        A presupposition is, “an implicit assumption about the world or background belief relating to an utterance whose truth is taken for granted in discourse.”

        You have been starting with the assumption that Total Depravity is true (and some other assumptions related to it) in order to argue for its various facets.

        Let’s look at your arguments “for” TD:

        #1 “TD begins with the scriptural proof”
        That’s an assertion, not a proof. TD is “assumed” true because you “assert” it true. That doesn’t make it less of a presupposition.

        #2 “People are not born with faith”
        Granted! But since all Christians believe that, it’s a non-sequitor. You might as well say, “humans are carbon based organisms” or “the sky looks blue” for all the relevance that statement has. It doesn’t follow that because “no one is born with faith” that Total Depravity must be true. Fallacy of the excluded middle is also committed, as TD is again “assumed” to be the only solution to man not being born with faith.

        #3 “People cannot receive faith except through the word”
        This is true in the sense that no one can be persuaded of a truth if that truth is never presented to them, so hearing the word must happen before someone can be persuaded by it (Rom 10:14.) But I am guessing that is not the sense you mean this phrase in – rather, as per your previous posts, you assume this refers to some form of effectual granting of faith to select hearers of the word. That is a presupposition you are reading into the text, not something you have supported through contextual scripture.

        #4 “Without faith, a person has zero ability to be saved”

        True, though this is not because faith gives a physical, mental, or even moral ability for a person to save himself, but because it gives a “legal right” based in the promises of God’s New Covenant, vs. any capacity or merit in the human himself, for God to grant salvation to the person. For a type of this – the blood of the lamb applied to the door post did not confer power to the Israelites to fight or fend off the Angel of Death. Rather, God mercifully ordered the Angel of Death to pass over any household that had blood on the doorframe. It was not their own “ability,” even an acquired one through the blood, but God’s gracious choice that delivered them. Their ‘ability to be delivered’ was a legal ability based in God’s prior promise to deliver those who applied the blood.

        But again, nothing in that demands that the Calvinist theory of Total Depravity be true to the exclusion of other options. Also, since ‘Total Inability’ is the idea man cannot respond to the gospel in faith, not that ‘man has no ability to be saved without faith’, this is not an accurate presentation of the Calvinist theory of Total Depravity to begin with.

        #5 In addition, people are without righteousness – there is none righteous, no not one
        True enough. No one but Christ is righteous. That doesn’t mandate “Total Depravity” though; all that is necessary to be counted as unrighteous is the breaking of a single law.

        #6 – “and until people receive faith, they cannot be made righteous”

        That’s yet another presupposition/assertion. It doesn’t follow from your other points or from scripture.

        Scripture states that it is impossible to please God without faith; that only by faith will God impute the righteousness of Christ to a believer, that one must believe in Christ to have salvation, that one must have faith to receive the Spirit, etc. Scripture nowhere states “until people receive faith they cannot be made righteous.”

        Gal 3 would be a great chapter to read, here. Those who hear with faith receive the Spirit and are justified by God.

        #7, your conclusion, “Thus, people are Totally Depraved”
        This is a circular conclusion, as you assumed total depravity to try to prove Total Depravity to show why Total Depravity was not an assumption….

        #8 (“…the wickedness of man was great on the earth, and that every intent of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually.”)

        That’s a quote from Gen 6:5. In context, mankind has become very evil overall to the point where God regrets even creating man and decides to wipe all mankind and most of the animals out with a flood – minus Noah who, as the passage mentions, is the exception being “righteous and blameless,” and his family.

        How does a period in the history of man, which is implied to be full of evil more than the norm, prove anything about the typical state of mankind? And how does a passage which specifically states that Noah is righteous and blameless prove that all individuals are totally depraved? We see other scripture where humans, despite their fallen condition, can do good things (even if they cannot be good enough to overcome their condemnation as lawbreakers since no amount of righteous deeds overcomes even a single instance of breaking the law (James 2:10.)

        https://ebible.com/questions/18144-can-natural-fallen-man-do-anything-that-is-spiritually-good

        It’s a serious out of context misuse of Gen:5 to try and use it to support the theory of Total Depravity.

        #9 “– and would be Utterly Depraved if God did not restrain them.”

        This, again, is an assertion. Scripture never implies or states that men would be “as evil as possible” or “Utterly Depraved” if God did not restrain them. The tree Adam and Eve ate from was the “Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil” – they would die if they ate it not because they would become “utterly depraved” but because they would physically suffer decay and death, and would morally be condemned to death for disobedience. Once a person “knows” good from evil, they are responsible to that knowledge (Jn 9:41, Rom 7:8-10, Rom 2:14-15, etc.)

        What scripture shows God restraining is not man’s sin (though it is certainly possibly God could interfere to restrain someone’s sin, it is not mandated and certainly not implied that everyone would be as evil as possible without such restraining) but rather God’s own wrath, which He restrains so as not to wipe everyone out immediately every time a sin is committed (Isa 48:9, Psa 78:38, II Pet 3:9, etc.) This is for the sake of His eternal plan of redemption and due to His mercy, wanting all to come to repentance.

        None of that reasoning shows that your belief in TD is not a presupposition. It just shows that you are entering the discussion with multiple presuppositions.

        ***

        Now, to the rest of your statements:

        “Some do live trusting that God has determined all things. Thereby, God’s promises to His elect are certain and sure and every prayer of faith availeth much.”

        Even non-Calvinists believe God’s promises are certain and that prayer in faith avails much – no belief in ‘determinism’ required, just a trust in the revealed character of God wherein He is faithful to keep His promises. Interestingly enough, though, you “every prayer of faith availeth much” does not follow from determinism whatsoever. The determinist cannot believe that the prayer in faith avails anything, since a consistent determinist believes that the faith, the prayer itself, and the final result of the prayer were all determined before the person was even born. The prayer isn’t changing anything of itself, then, it’s just the actor speaking the lines of a pre-scripted drama. The ‘audience’ might see change and think it is due to the prayer, but the script was already written on all points and the actor has no ability to ad-lib. The lines “change” nothing, they are merely the determined actualization of the script.
        “FOH knows that the only strategy for winning the lost is to obey Christ – ““Go into all the world and preach the gospel to all creation.” – and from whence does success come? “I planted, Apollos watered, but God was causing the growth.” So, young people are to be exhorted to go out and preach the gospel knowing that God is using them to call His elect.”

        First, under a determinist worldview evangelism is “strategy” in surface appearance only, like the lines of a play or the method the scriptwriter puts in for a character to change their mind. Evangelism is not seen as having the effectual power to truly change anything, since God already determined who would get faith and who would not get faith and who would hear and who would not hear and how they would hear and who they would hear by and who would go to share the gospel and who would stay, etc. Only the characters determined to evangelize would do so; if someone did not, God did not determine them to share the gospel. Only the characters predetermined by the script to believe would do so. Etc.

        Second, God calls everyone (in the sense of invitation, since the Greek word can mean either invites or names, and context is important as to which sense is meant.) But only some respond to the invitation, come to the feast, and put on the Wedding garments. God chooses those people, as opposed to everyone invited, to partake of the wedding feast (Matt 22.) God’s election, His ‘choice’ is that THOSE people, those who believe, are then called by His name and inherit the promises. God doesn’t call a predetermined elect group, rather He elected before time that all those in Christ (believers) will be made Holy, and predestined that those in Christ (believers; the faithful in Christ Jesus) would be adopted as Sons, etc. (Eph 1) God invites everyone. Those who accept become the elect.
        https://ebible.com/questions/3697-are-we-predestined-to-know-christ
        “Then, “I have literally heard YRR friends of mine say “I believe, FOH, that it is 100% true that God decreed and decided all things before time, and also that compatibly He gives free will to men and makes them responsible. It is beyond our comprehension, but true.””
        Such is the knowledge and power of God to decreed all things without denying the will of man in decisions. FOH denies God the ability to be God and appears to ridicule Him.”

        No, FOH just realizes as many of us do that claiming a contradiction is not a contradiction doesn’t make it less of a contradiction.
        https://www.logicallyfallacious.com/tools/lp/Bo/LogicalFallacies/70/Conflicting-Conditions

        “A and not A” is a contradictory statement. Man’s will is both “bound (by God)” and “not bound (by God)” is a contradictory belief.

        There is also a circular form of contradiction at work in the idea that both God AND man decide for a given sin to occur but only man is responsible. While it is logically possible for a decision to be shared (Such as, “A and B both decided together to do action C” or “Jesus decided to die on the cross out of free submission to the Father’s will”) but that is not what compatibilism holds. For compatibilism, the decision to sin is both viewed as “completely God” and “completely man” – often illustrated with the idea of a man walking through a door that says “I choose God” only to find that on the other side is written “I chose you” – then applying that down to the level of every sin the person ever commits. Technically speaking, compatibilism doesn’t actually hold to libertarian free will, but rather that man voluntarily does what his own nature desires which is always what God irresistibly determines and decrees for man to do.
        https://www.monergism.com/topics/free-will/compatibilism

        Now, it doesn’t seem possible that two agents both separately and completely decide a thing. But even if it were possible, and we were to assume the deterministic muddle that man voluntarily does what God decides for him to do true, this would only highlight the illogic of only holding man responsible for whatever sin he commits and not God, since there is no logical reason that God, as also deciding what man thinks and does, would bear no responsibility but the human would.

        “Then, “The double conundrum here is
        (1) “These are written that you may believe” along with all the “convince” “reason with” “persuade” and “choose for yourselves this day” verses are all a hideous mockery if Determinism is true. Calvinism makes it looks like God is only pretending to make this offer to people.”
        Yet, will FOH deny that faith is a prerequisite for anyone to avail himself of God’s promises? Will FOH deny that faith comes form hearing the word? Will FOH deny that it is the HOLY Spirit that illumines the spirit of a man through faith? He appears to do so, but even he cannot deny the Scriptures. FOH is perfectly aware of all this but purposely seems to ignore them wanting to convince people that the Scriptures are not true.”

        You aren’t even addressing what FOH is saying, let alone proving to anyone that FOH is somehow ignoring scripture by referencing scripture.

        FOHs argument, to break down his linguistic prose into a logical sequence, is:

        P1: Scripture uses terms A, B, C, D, and E.
        P2: Terms A, B, C, D, and E heavily imply, if not outright mandate, libertarian free will to be sensible.
        P3: Determinism does not allow for libertarian free will
        C: Determinism makes nonsense of scripture

        Your reply doesn’t even reference FOH’s premises or reasoning. Instead, it’s:

        Q: Will FOH deny this thing that every Christian believes? (No, obviously)
        Q2: Will FOH deny this other thing all Christians believe? (No, though you might interpret what ‘faith comes by hearing’ differently than he does since you seem to think the hearing itself effectually grants faith for some, when the contextual interpretation is that no one can believe something they have never heard about, hence faith comes by hearing.)
        Q3: Will FOH deny this other-other thing that Christians believe? (No, though again he might interpret things differently. I would guess FOH sees the indwelling Holy Spirit illuminating deep spiritual truths to a believer, wheras you might interpret it as the Holy Spirit illuminating a non-believers Spirit by granting him faith. [Side note: John 1 shows how Christ is the illuminating light for all men, not just believers. Lack of light isn’t the problem – love of darkness is.]
        P1: FOH does know/agree with all those things.
        P2: FOH ignores/denies these things
        C; FOH wants to convince people that the scriptures aren’t true.

        ????????????

        With all due respect, that isn’t logic or reasoning or even general good faith discussion. It’s deflecting from the need to support your own view with scripture to instead launch character attacks at other people, or pretend that their disbelief in a man-made theory is akin to denying fundamentals of the faith, or pretend that their defining a term or concept differently than you is akin to denying what scripture states on a topic.

        “Certainly, FOH knows Calvinism. That is why he continually ignores the Scriptures on which Calvinism is built.”

        No one is “ignoring” them by pointing out that none of the support verses given for the Calvinist/Arminian starting point of Total Depravity actually mandate what the theory claims when taken in their actual text and context. Pointing out that the interpretation of scripture is flawed, or that a line of reasoning is fallacious or contradictory, is not “ignoring scripture.”

        Here again, you resort to character aspersion rather than confront what people are actually claiming or talking about.

        Again, though, I’ve spent way too much time replying! I’ll have to exit for now unless any new development comes up (as in actual contextual scripture is put forward that has not been considered.) Try to stay friendly 😉 Always assume the best of the people you debate with (Spiritually, logically, intellectually, ethically, etc.) and you will find that you will engage in character attacks a lot less and stay on topic more.

      27. I must tell you Jenai how happy I am to have you commenting here! I have appreciated your research and layout of idea.

        You said you need stop here unless “any new development comes up (as in actual contextual scripture is put forward that has not been considered.)” Oh….that will not be happening from the resident Calvinists.

        Just repeating the same ‘ol talking points (learned from monergism.com), then accusing us of never answering them, then a name-calling here and there.

        I will continue to work my way through the Bible, and if God grants me strength and time, will post my readings/thoughts to show that the message of the Bible is surely not the same as the message I learned from Calvinistic books (I learned from Van Til, Boettner, and Pink before the Internet).

      28. JR writes:
        “pretend that their disbelief in a man-made theory is akin to denying fundamentals of the faith, or pretend that their defining a term or concept differently than you is akin to denying what scripture states on a topic”

        These are the tactics that ultimately revealed the unsupportable foundations of Calvinism to me. My Calvi-pastor repeatedly mocked or condemned all who challenged the ‘Doctrines of Grace’ rather than setting forth logical premises to support them. All who dared to interpret scripture differently from him (‘When I speak from the pulpit, I speak for God’) however qualified and well-supported their interpretation, were automatically rejected as godless heretics. I had to laugh at the number of Calvinist scholars, like Doug Moo, declared heretics under such rubrics.

        I have only a layman’s grasp of logic, but enough to recognize when it is being abused. When logic is not on your side presumption, irrelevant appeals and equivocation are your only options.

      29. TS00
        There is another thing going on too.

        Calvinist demonize non-Calvinists so much (calling them universalists, heretics, and semi-Polynesians) that later—- even when they see the arguments from Scripture point away from Calvinism— they are loathe to switch (ay ay ay, they would become a semi-Polynesian!!)

      30. Jenai,
        One more thing about that good post of yours. Yes, Calvinists will quote (out of context) the Genesis verse about “men doing evil”. You did a good job rebutting that with the ebible article.

        Even a child would know that this statement is not to be taken out of context, literally….and worse…. applied to all humanity at all times.

        Obviously there were some non-evil things happening (mothers giving their breasts to their babies; mothers feeding their infants, men sharing their hunted or gathered food with the family, etc) or they would have killed themselves off in 15 minutes.

        It is unbiblical, illogical, and just plain childish to take that half-verse and extrapolate it out to prove Total Depravity (all unredeemed men of all times have only done all-evil, all the time).

        RH proposing such an idea indicates to what level he is bringing that man-made idea to the table as a “given” and presupposition. There is not much you can say if a person is willing to take a half verse and extrapolate it out as the founding doctrine for TULIP.

      31. JR: “You have been starting with the assumption that Total Depravity is true (and some other assumptions related to it) in order to argue for its various facets.”

        Two presuppositions here: (1) a person is born without faith; (2) people are born unrighteous. I assert (1) and (2) to be true. As a shorthand, this is labelled TD. You agree on (1). On (2), you say, “all that is necessary to be counted as unrighteous is the breaking of a single law.” If your position is thta people are born righteous and become unrighteous when they sin, then you disagree with TD – and that means that you understand what the Calvinist means by TD. I disagree where you say, “This is a circular conclusion, as you assumed total depravity to try to prove Total Depravity to show why Total Depravity was not an assumption….”

        Then, “#6 – “and until people receive faith, they cannot be made righteous”
        That’s yet another presupposition/assertion. It doesn’t follow from your other points or from scripture.”

        This is based on Romans 5, “having been justified by faith,” where being justified is being made righteous. Thus, I agree where you say, “Gal 3 would be a great chapter to read, here. Those who hear with faith receive the Spirit and are justified by God.”

        Then, “It’s a serious out of context misuse of Gen:5 to try and use it to support the theory of Total Depravity.”

        Genesis 5 is an example to illustrate TD. That Noah was righteous requires that Noah have had faith and the source of faith would have been God through His word to Noah.

      32. rhutchin
        (1) a person is born without faith;

        br.d
        FIRSTLY:
        When a Calvinist says “a person is born without faith” he does not mean that person is born without EXERCISING faith.

        People are born without a college education – for example.
        In such case a college education is defined as a COMMODITY that must be given to a person.

        The Calvinist is firstly taught to conceive of faith (unto salvation) as a COMMODITY which people are not born with.
        And it therefore must be given from an external (i.e. divine) source.

        SECONDLY:
        When Calvinists use the term “faith” they are careful to avoid QUALIFYING it – which strategically adds confusion to a conversation

        People in the Gospels for example do EXERCISE faith for the regeneration of their bodies – in the process of being healed by Jesus or disciples. Jesus EXPECTS people to EXERCISE faith for this process – as a condition of their healing.
        And there is nothing in the N.T. narratives that indicates people were not born with faith QUALIFIED in that sense.

        So the “faith” that the Calvinist is referring – he QUALIFIES as a DIFFERENT faith – in that it is not that faith Jesus EXPECTS people to EXERCISE for physical regeneration.

        Jesus can be found expressing marvel that certain people have certain degrees of faith
        Which LOGICALLY shows that Jesus is not anticipating faith as a COMMODITY which is divinely given for specific purposes.
        If he was anticipating that – it would be IRRATIONAL for him to marvel when people expressed it.

        Bottom Line:
        The N.T. never EXPLICITLY treats faith as a COMMODITY which must be given to a person.
        The Calvinist must EXTRAPOLATE that concept by data-mining verses looking for proof-texts.

        So the Calvinist starts with an extra-biblical presupposition – which he SUPERIMPOSES onto verses in scripture that he can use as proof-texts.

        And the fact that the Calvinist treats faith (unto salvation) as a COMMODITY is why they avoid QUALIFYING the term

      33. So true br.d,

        Here’s another example.

        A person is a “practicing” Jew (Catholic, Mormon, etc). They are exercising faith. This faith is in the wrong person (not Christ) but faith. They are alive and active and practicing. They have faith.

        Now, a believer in Christ befriends them and slowly starts a Bible study. Gently, weekly for 4 years they meet and slowly the non-believer (with faith in something else) is “convinced” “persuaded” and “reasoned with” (I’m just quoting Paul here).

        Then that person of faith comes to faith in Christ.

        Now….somehow —-and because of big Greek presuppositions— Calvinist want to teach us that in a nanosecond that person is given faith and then calls on (ooops, irresistibly calls on) Christ. Sproul says it is instantaneous.

        So…. all those years of faith in a false person (Judaism, Catholicism, etc) and all those 4 years of “seeking the Lord” in Bible study and earnest discussion and prayer….. are zero, nothing, zilch, nada. That person was “too-dead” (TD) and is ONLY alive when “regenerated” and given faith which is nanoseconds before he then calls on Christ. Prior to that given-faith moment he is a “too-dead” God-hater.

        I have no idea how they put all this together—– Let’s go back to Mary-worshiping Augustine to get a hint.

      34. FOH
        I have no idea how they put all this together—– Let’s go back to Mary-worshiping Augustine to get a hint.

        br.d
        Exactly!

        The Calvinist conception of faith as a COMMODITY – evolved from Calvin’s adaptation of Augustine’s THEORY that sacramental baptism produces regeneration. Every infant is subject to eternal death unless baptized.

      35. Yes…. that is what Mary-worshiping Augustine taught (and he is still the hero to most Reformed people)….but most are backing away from that.

        A few quotes from Kevin DeYoung a rock star in the YRR movement (who baptizes babies)…..

        https://www.thegospelcoalition.org/blogs/kevin-deyoung/a-brief-defense-of-infant-baptism/

        “One of the best things I get to do as a pastor is to administer the sacrament of infant baptism to the covenant children in my congregation….”

        “We do not presume that this child is regenerate (though he may be)….. We baptize infants because they are covenant children and should receive the sign of the covenant.”
        ———–

        So they baptize potentially “unregenerate,” “reprobate,” “created for destruction,” “intentionally created to receive God’s wrath,” children because they are “covenant children.”

        In what way are they “covenant children” if they are (as he said) also the ones God plans to be the “reprobate”?

        That’s a very weird covenant to me.

        They can’t even hear themselves.

      36. FOH

        Kevin DeYoung
        -quote
        “One of the best things I get to do as a pastor is to administer the sacrament of infant baptism to the covenant children in my congregation….”

        In what way are they “covenant children” if they are (as he said) also the ones God plans to be the “reprobate”?
        That’s a very weird covenant to me.
        They can’t even hear themselves.

        br.d
        Yeh!
        It would be a SUPERFICIAL covenant wouldn’t it.

        Pretty obvious – that is an adaptation of Augustine’s THEORY that infants are ZAPPED with salvation during a baptism ritual
        But for Augustine that ritual – along with the ritual transubstantiation – had to be performed by an RC priest – or the HOCUS POCUS would not happen. Luther adopted this as well

        The RC church of Augustine’s day was very superstitious – incorporating various occult principles.

      37. Wow…. have a look at what Lutherans believe! Looks like they are not Calvinist after all since the baptizing parent is the one who initiates salvation:

        “The Sacrament of Holy Baptism is the sacrament by which one is initiated into the Christian faith. Lutherans teach that at baptism, they receive God’s promise of salvation. At the same time, they receive the faith they need to be open to God’s grace. Lutherans baptize by sprinkling or pouring water on the head of the person (or infant) as the Trinitarian formula is spoken. Lutherans teach baptism to be necessary, but not absolutely necessary, for salvation. That means that although baptism is indeed necessary for salvation, it is, as Luther said, contempt for the sacraments that condemns, not lack of the sacraments. Therefore, one is not denied salvation merely because one may have never had the opportunity to be baptized. This is what is meant by saying that baptism is necessary—but not absolutely necessary—to salvation.”

      38. Interesting!

        Looks like the Lutherans are similar to the Calvinists in how inventive they are in getting around biblical inconsistencies. :-]

      39. I absolutely agree that one of the huge errors within Calvinism is proclaiming faith a commodity. It completely throws off the meaning of scripture when it is distorted thusly.

        God does not look down upon people and say, “Hmmm, the problem with these people is that they are lacking the commodity of faith, which is the magic commodity that allows them into heaven. I will choose a select few and mystically give them this missing commodity. Then, when I look down upon men, I will see some with faith and be pleased with them. Those who I have so gifted I will now give new life and all of the blessings that I have to offer.”

        Rather, God knows that Satan has deceived men into believing that we have a contractual relationship with God, and we are missing the necessary means to keep up our end of the contract, which is a perfect keeping of the law. Being angry and desiring to punish all who do not keep perfectly the law, God sends his own Son to do it in the stead of [some] men. This propitiatory atonement theory of Calvinism – which has filtered into all of Protestantism – is tied together with the false ‘commodity of faith’ thinking.

        Together, they create the picture of an angry, punitive God who must get his ounce of flesh. This is Calvinism’s (and much of Protestantism’s) God. I am trending away from that thinking. Rather than seeing faith as a commodity one must have in order to be approved, I see it as the route through which one receives the freely offered love and grace of God. It is a fine distinction, but I would leave out the additional step of God giving faith, then giving regeneration which allows belief.

        Instead, I would suggest that when we believe the gospel message, our eyes are opened to what has been made available, and we are reborn as a result. This leaves out the rather clunky picture of God standing with a clipboard checking off who is in and who is barred. Rather, salvation has been made available by the death and resurrection of Jesus, and all who believe this, immediately receive the blessings thereof.

        It is similar to believing that a sign in a shop offering free ice cream is genuine. The store owner does not give it or not give it based on his judgment of how sincere the faith of the people who come in seeking it is; rather, he put the sign in the window, and all who come in believing in the offer will receive the free gift. All who read it and say, ‘Right, nothing is free in this world’ and walk on by will never receive what was genuinely, freely offered.

        I believe that many of our perceptions of God have been faulty for many, many years (at least since the 16th century, and probably much longer), and Gnosticism has pretty much subtly reigned within Protestantism and evangelicalism. By creating the faulty version of faith as a commodity, Calvin et. al were able to condemn it as a ‘work’ and introduce their solution as TD and Predestination via Divine Determinism. I would tend to agree with Calvinism that the typical perception of faith is based on viewing it as a commodity (making it a work). Discarding the false dichotomy, I see faith as ‘how’ we receive the gift of salvation, not ‘why’.

      40. br.d writes, “The Calvinist is firstly taught to conceive of faith (unto salvation) as a COMMODITY which people are not born with.”

        The Calvinist is taught to define faith according to Hebrews 11. Faith is assurance and conviction derived from the gospel. Whether one describes faith as a commodity seems irrelevant to the position of Calvinism that people are not born with Faith – or not born with assurance and conviction.

        When Hebrews says, “without faith it is impossible to please Him, for he who comes to God must believe that He is, and that He is a rewarder of those who diligently seek Him,” we are to understand that the presence of assurance and conviction manifests as belief that God is and that God is a rewarder of those who seek Him. We also see how many people in the OT could be seen to have faith. In Romans 5, we see the effect of faith in the NT, “Therefore, having been justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom also we have access by faith into this grace in which we stand, and rejoice in hope of the glory of God.”

      41. br.d
        The Calvinist is firstly taught to conceive of faith (unto salvation) as a COMMODITY which people are not born with.”

        rhutchin
        The Calvinist is taught to define faith according to Hebrews 11. Faith is assurance and conviction derived from the gospel.

        br.d
        FIRSTLY:
        The JW’s also *CLAIM* their doctrines come directly from scripture – so everyone should be smart enough not to fall for that.

        SECONDLY:
        Statements like “derived from the gospel” are too ambiguous to be trustworthy.

        rhutchin
        Whether one describes faith as a commodity seems irrelevant to the position of Calvinism that people are not born with Faith – or not born with assurance and conviction.

        br.d
        The term COMMODITY is used to more precisely QUALIFY the conception of faith (unto salvation) that Calvinist has – when he asserts that “people are not born with it”. And therefore it must be given from a source external to the person.

        Obviously people are born with some kind of faith. A baby is born with faith sufficient to believe its mother will come when it cries.
        But for the Calvinist – the faith that baby is born with does not QUALIFY as the faith they are conceiving of.

      42. “Obviously people are born with some kind of faith. A baby is born with faith sufficient to believe its mother will come when it cries.
        But for the Calvinist – the faith that baby is born with does not QUALIFY as the faith they are conceiving of.”

        Great point! I was thinking faith in Christ, but yes, even a baby is born with faith in some things (like that mommy is “safe” or that mommy has food) and the ability to trust.

        I heard a harrowing story from a missionary who works in a couple countries in Africa and has visited hundreds of orphanages on her various visits. She said that unlike nurseries in the U.S., the orphanages there are for the most part deathly silent with no babies crying. When she asked the workers about it they would say that new children coming in cry for about a week, then not much after that: they’ve given up. There is no one to come when they cry, so they no longer bother crying. The babies lost their faith that help would come when they called.

        I have three little girls – 3, 1, and 4 months. Some great advice I got before my first was, no matter how hard it got, always come when they cry the first couple of weeks. That way, trust is built that when they have a need, mommy will meet it, and they will save crying for real needs later on. And it worked! All three of my girls have been pretty happy tempered babies who only really cried with a need. My second even didn’t really “cry” much as a young infant at all past those first few weeks – she would just give a cute little “I protest” or “I need something” squeak to let me know and then would entertain herself until I came. It’s a bit overwhelming how easily and completely they trust, which is likely why Jesus said that “faith like a child” is how we should come to God

        My eldest toddler is now at the age where she ‘cries’ if I give her the wrong color cup, but she still has faith that I will feed her and protect her, and she has endless (albeit misplaced) faith that there will be chocolate ice-cream in the freezer if she just asks enough times.

        Which all does relate to the Calvinist position since TD holds that man is ‘unable’ to have faith in Christ, as if putting trust in Christ’s work and the evidence of it was far beyond the capability of man even though humans trust/put faith in things (both reasonable and unreasonable) all the time. Some people put faith in impossible things (flat Earth, reincarnation on an endless wheel/cycle of life, various gods and goddesses, karma, etc.,) so why is faith in a possible and very true thing impossible?

      43. wonderful post Jenai!

        Yes – and Jesus fully expected people would exercise faith for their physical hearings.
        As a matter of fact there is a continued pattern throughout the O.T. and the N.T. that divine miracles are preceded by a divine command. Israel is commanded to put blood on the doorpost. Moses is commanded to raise his rod before the red-sea.
        Jesus commands the 10 lepers to go show themselves to the priest. A man is commanded to take up his bed and walk.
        All miracles preceded by a command which Jesus expected people to obey.

        And no indications in the text ever that people didn’t already have at least some degree of the faith God expected them to exercise.

        Augustine believed that salvation was miraculously given to a baby during the sacrament of baptism.
        There is a conception of salvation given as if it were a COMMODITY.

        I suppose some Calvinists will claim Augustine derived that doctrine from scripture – the same way they claim all of their doctrines are derived from it.

      44. Nice post Jenai:

        On a similar note (and different string on this site) I responded to GA

        GA: All people have faith/belief/trust it is simply the object of their faith that is different.”

        FOH: Right! (Calvinist) James White debates Mormons, Muslims etc all the time. He is challenging their FAITH in that thing. It is amazing that Calvinists preach that man has no faith until God gives it to him. Of course they do!

        On the “foolishness” note (they get a lot of bad-hermeneutic miles out of that verse!!)….. of course the Gospel is foolishness when you first hear it. Until it’s not! (Even the “elect” would say it was foolishness when they first heard it —so that proves nothing.)

      45. FOH:
        Right! (Calvinist) James White debates Mormons, Muslims etc all the time. He is challenging their FAITH in that thing. It is amazing that Calvinists preach that man has no faith until God gives it to him…..

        br.d
        Excellent point FOH!
        Here is just one more Calvinist self-contradiction. Why would a Calvinist challenge a Muslim to question THE OBJECT of his faith – if that Calvinist believes people aren’t born with any faith!

        Calvinists often remind me of a statue with two faces.

        In this example:
        Out of face-#1 the statue asserts people are not born with faith – and therefore don’t have it.
        Out of face-#2 the statue challenges THE OBJECT of people’s faith *AS-IF* they WERE born with it.

      46. FOH writes, “On the “foolishness” note (they get a lot of bad-hermeneutic miles out of that verse!!)….. of course the Gospel is foolishness when you first hear it. Until it’s not! (Even the “elect” would say it was foolishness when they first heard it —so that proves nothing.)”

        So, what changes? Faith comes by hearing. Thus, faith accounts for the change.

      47. I would like to make another comment on the “foolishness” idea.

        As I said, even the “elect” would say it was foolishness —-until it wasnt.

        Now….Calvinists would have us believe that it is foisted-faith that makes the difference, yet we see NOT one example of that.

        Paul would have us think it was Foolishness-first….then being “persuaded,” “convinced,” and “reasoned with” (all his words).

        Sergius Paulus would have us think it was Foolishness-first….then amazement at miracles.

        John would have us think it was Foolishness-first….then signs and wonders… 2:23 “While He was in Jerusalem at the Passover Feast, many people saw the signs He was doing and believed in His name.” 20:31 “these things were written that you might believe.”

        Exodus tells us of the Foolishness-first words of Aaron ….. then signs to convince: “Aaron spoke all the words which the LORD had spoken to Moses. He then performed the signs in the sight of the people. So the people believed.” [Not foisted-faith…. just foolishness-seeing-believing.]

        Jesus would have us think it was Foolishness-first…. then “Because you have seen Me, you have believed….”

        Matthew, Mark, and Luke would have Jesus telling a woman about “her” faith “‘Daughter, take courage; your faith has made you well.’ At once the woman was made well.”

        So….
        Calvinist example of foisted-faith = 0
        Biblical examples of human faith = Many!

      48. rh writes:
        “So, what changes? Faith comes by hearing. Thus, faith accounts for the change.”

        There are many things I now hold to be true, which I once viewed as foolishness. What changed?

        The answers are many and varied. The fact is, when you reject something as true, you consider it ‘foolishness’. If you later – for whatever reason – come to believe it, it is no longer foolishness to you. This does not require any mystical, supernatural intervention, no transformation of your being from death to life. All it might take is new information, more maturity, greater humility, or a willingness to let go of old presuppositions.

      49. rhutchin writes:
        “So, what changes? Faith comes by hearing. Thus, faith accounts for the change.”

        br.d
        I am again reminded that Calvinists consistently speak *AS-IF* “mere” permission exists in Calvinism when it doesn’t

        Take rhutchin’s statement above. “so what changes?”

        Well LOGICALLY – it would have to be what Calvin’s god changes.

        If a person cannot hear – it is because Calvin’s god does not PERMIT that.
        if a person cannot express faith unto salvation – it is because Calvin’s god does not PERMIT that.

        So what REALLY changes?
        What Calvin’s god does – is what changes.

        Therefore in Calvinism – it is LESS TRUTHFUL to say that faith accounts for the change – and MORE TRUTHFUL to say Calvin’s god accounts for the change.

        I think it is a RED-FLAG that Calvinists consistently choose the LESS TRUTHFUL statements.

        Something I have learned over time – Calvinist language is not a TRUTH-TELLING language – it is a COSMETIC language
        Its designed to present a controlled image.

      50. TS00 writes, “If you later – for whatever reason – come to believe it, it is no longer foolishness to you.”

        The key term, “– for whatever reason” The answer to your question, “There are many things I now hold to be true, which I once viewed as foolishness. What changed? ” With respect to your salvation, you received faith and that which before was foolishness became assurance and conviction.

      51. rhutchin
        you received faith

        br.d
        He took out the TOTAL DEPRAVITY floppy drive and replaced it with the ELECT floppy drive.
        What changed was the programming! :-]

      52. That is such an accurate depiction of what they assert. If they could but see it, few would embrace it.

      53. TS00
        That is such an accurate depiction of what they assert. If they could but see it, few would embrace it.

        br.d
        Yes TSOO I agree –
        But first they have to be delivered from the state of DOUBLE-THINK – which the doctrine conditions their minds to embrace.
        We humans can’t see what the mind does not allow us to see.
        And we have to factor in spiritual pride as well.

      54. TS00 writes:
        “If you later – for whatever reason – come to believe it, it is no longer foolishness to you.”

        Rh writes:
        The key term, “– for whatever reason” The answer to your question, “There are many things I now hold to be true, which I once viewed as foolishness. What changed? ” With respect to your salvation, you received faith and that which before was foolishness became assurance and conviction.”

        This, obviously, is your personal interpretation. I would assert that I was confronted with the reality of the love of God, and believed it. In other words through having faith, not because of being given imported faith, I became a child of God, reborn and endowed with the Holy Spirit.

        I reject your theory that I was lacking some commodity, which God had to then supply, before I had the ability to believe in God. As you well know, I reject the mechanical, robotic, God-pulling-the-strings theology of Calvinism.

        To the contrary, I believe all men have the ability to believe or disbelieve in anything, (just as I believe this and you do not) and it is their choices that make them what they become. Thus, one who chooses to believe in God’s promises, becomes his child. One who rejects them, and the God who made them, hardens his heart and, minus a change, makes himself an object of wrath. Faith, as a mustard seed, leads to life. Disbelief (non-faith) leads to destruction.

      55. TS00 writes, “In other words through having faith, not because of being given imported faith,”

        Then everyone should be just like you because you are not really different from anyone else. However, that is not what we observe, is it? What or who accounts for you being somewhat different – God is one option. If you have another, let’s hear it.

        Then, “To the contrary, I believe all men have the ability to believe or disbelieve in anything,…”

        That’s your personal opinion. Surely you recognize the role of faith in decisions about salvation and the specific information in Romans – faith comes from hearing the gospel and no other source is ever given. You need to bring your beliefs in line with the Scriptures.

      56. rhutchin
        You need to bring your beliefs in line with the Scriptures.

        br.d
        FIRSTLY:
        What this REALLY MEANS is “you need to bring your beliefs in line with MY INTERPRETATION of scripture”

        SECONDLY:
        We have a good example of DOUBLE-THINK here.
        Since Calvin’s god RENDERS-CERTAIN every neurological impulse – and thus Calvin’s god DIRECTLY MAKES/CONTROLS what the creature thinks/believes – there is no thing as a creature bringing his own beliefs anywhere.

      57. “Then everyone should be just like you because you are not really different from anyone else. However, that is not what we observe, is it? What or who accounts for you being somewhat different – God is one option. If you have another, let’s hear it.”

        This philosophical stumbling block seems to be at the heart of Calvinism. The contention seems to be that there can’t be any human-rooted reason that some welcome the gospel and others reject it without making the people who accept the gospel intrinsically “better” in some way. Spurgeon’s ‘Prayer of an Arminian’ is based on this strange philosophy that for people to have free will it would mean that humans could just use ‘willpower’ to get faith or faith would be somehow based in merit.

        But this is a false philosophy, since it doesn’t understand that faith is in every way contrasted with boasting. Faith is rooted in humility and a right perception of oneself before God as a sinner deserving of death. It isn’t a work of personal “merit” or based in some intrinsic “superiority” that makes one respond to the gospel while another rejects it.

        It is personal recognition that one is flawed, sick, helpless, and that Christ is literally one’s only hope in the world of reconciliation with God. That isn’t something humans can ‘boast in’ without completely redefining what boasting is.

        To see the illogic of the Calvinist claim that if people we able to respond in faith it would mean those who responded in faith were intrinsically “better” somehow, or that because faith is something good that God requires us to do that it would mean a believer would get partial “credit” for salvation unless God accomplished the faith itself, we need only look at Christ’s own words:

        “And hearing this, Jesus said to them, “It is not those who are healthy who need a physician, but those who are sick; I did not come to call the righteous, but sinners.”” Mark 2:!7

        Is a sick person intrinsically “better” than a healthy person because they agree with the doctor’s revealed diagnosis and accept treatment? Would admitting one’s brokenness mean one was less broken than another person? It only would if some were ABLE to admit brokeness while others were completely INABLE – such as in the Calvinist view.

      58. Excellent Jenai.

        You said “But this is a false philosophy, since it doesn’t understand that faith is in every way contrasted with boasting.”

        1. They tell us that it will lead to boasting if we think we had faith on our own. Really? I dont see anyone doing that.

        2. They say that our version of human faith is really a “work”…. but Paul handles this pretty clearly in Romans 4 juxtaposing faith and works. What a great opportunity for him to say “God-given-faith,” or “not by works but faith that God gives the elect” or any such formula. But NO… NEVER…. He never comes close to that….. just always talking about faith the way everyone (but Calvinist) understands it.

        They have to compose their philosophy based on:

        A. An Aristotelian idea of God (controlling of all things, or controlling of nothing)
        B. Imposed idea of TD/TI (no where in the Bible)
        C. Clear mis-reading of Ephesian 2:8-9 (making faith the gift, not salvation).

        Then they set up straw men, take the “moral high ground” and try to bully people in.

      59. “They have to compose their philosophy based on:

        A. An Aristotelian idea of God (controlling of all things, or controlling of nothing)
        B. Imposed idea of TD/TI (no where in the Bible)
        C. Clear mis-reading of Ephesian 2:8-9 (making faith the gift, not salvation).

        Then they set up straw men, take the “moral high ground” and try to bully people in.”

        Very true! When I first started studying Calvinism, I was focused more on the basic systematized points of TULIP as a starting point. But as I went further I realized that TULIP’s surface level initial appearance of cohesion is the mere glue of philosophical claims, presuppositions, re-definitions, and deliberate misinterpretations, without which the fake petals would quickly float apart. And many of the people who spread the fake blooms cry, “Bask in awe of the beautiful tulip of God’s sovereignty! Breathe deep the scent of the gospel! If you doubt this is real, you are a heretic and questioning God Himself! Only the foolish and unregenerate would dare refuse to embrace and plant these flowers! Will you take this flower and care for it, crafting a duplicate flower of your own to spread to others, or will you show yourself to be a fool, or worse, a reprobate, rejecting the doctrines of grace which contain the gospel of God?”

        Never mind that it makes little sense under the theory, as disbelief of Calvinism and even the individual mindset and arguments of those who disagree have been decreed by God….

        It reminds me a bit of “The Emperor has no Clothes” – only if instead of the town sighing with relief that the kid proclaimed the obvious, they went and browbeat the child into thinking he really was stupid and potentially evil and ‘questioning the emperor’ for not being able to see the clothes.

      60. JR: “When I first started studying Calvinism, I was focused more on the basic systematized points of TULIP as a starting point.”

        You should have started with God and His attributes, such as omniscience. Once comfortable with God, you could then have moved on to man.

        Then, “Never mind that it makes little sense under the theory, as disbelief of Calvinism and even the individual mindset and arguments of those who disagree have been decreed by God….”

        Well, it is God who gives faith to whom He will. Isn’t it?

      61. JR: “The contention seems to be that there can’t be any human-rooted reason that some welcome the gospel and others reject it…”

        Yes. this because of the presence or absence of faith (among other things, like regeneration), but let’s get faith squared away first..

        Then, “Spurgeon’s ‘Prayer of an Arminian’ is based on this strange philosophy that for people to have free will it would mean that humans could just use ‘willpower’ to get faith or faith would be somehow based in merit.”

        Yes, Why because people are slaves to sin and that slavery precludes faith until one has been freed from that slavery.

        Then, “But this is a false philosophy, since it doesn’t understand that faith is in every way contrasted with boasting. Faith is rooted in humility and a right perception of oneself before God as a sinner deserving of death.”

        Wrong. Faith is assurance in things hoped for; conviction of things not seen – in other words, eternal life. That’s the root of faith. Then, comes belief per John 3, “whoever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life.” Faith is what moves a person to respond positively by believing tin Christ.

        Then, “It only would if some were ABLE to admit brokeness while others were completely INABLE – such as in the Calvinist view.”

        Yes. Those with faith (assurance and conviction) are ABLE to admit brokeness while others, having no faith, are completely INABLE

      62. TS00,

        That’s right. Kinda like this:

        Mr X has faith in something (Evolutionary accidents, Islam, Mormonism, Catholicism, etc).

        Johnny Baptist presents the Gospel to him (which includes the line “Christ died for you” —- included everywhere by MacArthur and Piper).

        Mr X says ….. that is stupid and foolishness.

        Mrs X (always the wiser gender!) says “Let’s just go with Johnny and Ethel Baptist to church next week on Father’s Day.”

        Mr X sits in the pew and say this is foolishness.

        Two guys he knows from his bowling league see him and ask him to a Dudes’ Night Bowl Bible Study.

        Mr X attends and bowls and hears a little bit of Bible study, which is foolishness (but he does know the cool dude teaching the study….so… he’s curious why he would believe this foolishness).

        Mr X attends the Dudes’ Bowl Study for 4 years. Cool leader explains the Gospel (including Christ took your place— which is said to everyone there).

        During these same 4 years Mrs X is going to church regularly… and goes also to MOPS, and several ladies’ retreats (she got to keep the lovely center-piece at her table!).

        During these 4 years Mr Cool is “persuading” Mr X (2 Cor 5:11). Mr Cool “reasons with” Mr X (Acts 17:2). Mr Cool “convinces” Mr X (Acts 28:23).

        After 4 and a half years, Mr and Mrs X make a public profession of faith and get baptized, having gone from “foolishness to being convinced.”

        They give their testimony in front of the whole church before being baptized and it is filled with the word “foolishness” “convincing” “persuading”….. and since this is a non-Calvinist church everyone says amen and claps.

        Everyone…. except three visiting, bearded, tattooed, young, white, male, college guys in the back. They are grieved that people would be allowed to “rob God of his glory.” At the coffee hour after the service they, in a snarky manner, insist that Mr X was actually “dead” and the Gospel was “foolishness” and he was given that faith.

        Mr X asks the angry-sounding YRR guys “When did He give me faith? Was I dead all those 4 years of Bible study and consistent searching of the Scriptures in discussion with friends and my wife? When—- at what point was I Calvinistically ‘regenerated’ and ‘made alive’ so I could then ‘freely choose’?”

        The angry young men quickly use their phones to go to Sproul’s site (one of the young men) and monergism.com (the 2 others).

        They say to Mr X….. “Your were regenerated nanoseconds before you believed and made the public profession.”

        Mr X, scratches his head (cuz he was actually present during the whole process) and asks, “What was I during those 4 years of Bible study, prayer, and seeking answers?”

        Angry young man #1 (the one with his left arm in full sleeve-tattoos, plus one tiny tat-cross on his neck) says to him with conviction and vigor….”You were ‘dead’ and a God-hater.”

        Mr X responds simply, “That’s Good News alright!”

        ……………… then after a moment of reflection…… Mr X adds, “Yep…. your ‘gospel’ is indeed foolishness!”

      63. FOH writes, “After 4 and a half years, Mr and Mrs X make a public profession of faith and get baptized, having gone from “foolishness to being convinced.””

        I think Saul of Tarsus would make a better example. here’s a guy who studies the Scriptures pretty much all his life even studying under the great teach Gamalieland by his testimony he was, “taught according to the strictness of our fathers’ law, and was zealous toward God as you all are today.” He even got his PhD in Bible. He then went on to persecute the new Sect of “Christians” throwing them in jail and voting to kill some. Why? Because it was foolishness to him and this Christ was a stumbling block. But one day, on the road to Damascus, that all changed. Can anyone guess what happened that caused Saul of Tarsus to go from foolishness to being convinced?? I bet even FOH knows.

      64. Rhutchin,

        Again, Paul is a unique case. God chose him for a specific service, to minister to the Gentiles, and influenced his life in a way God knew would bring him to his knees in repentance and belief. Paul’s conversion was noteworthy because it was *unusual* and out of the ordinary. When you trusted in Christ, was it because you saw a vision and God called out to you audibly from heaven? Doubtfully. Most people do not experience miraculous visions or have Jesus directly tell them who He is.

        Trying to over-extrapolate from unique cases like prophets or Apostles to claim that *every* believer everywhere has experienced a supernatural vision or been directly given overwhelming irresistible proof is nonsensical. It’s like claiming id a book says, “Timmy bit the apple and there was a worm inside” that the book must be telling us that every apply which Timmy might potentially bite into has a worm. It just doesn’t follow. The exception is not the rule. Paul’s conversion only highlights the difference from the norm, it isn’t setting up the norm.

        And as Jesus states elsewhere, even someone rising from the dead or amazing miracles won’t convince some people, while still others are willing to just come trusting as little children on faith with no visible ‘proof.’

        I trusted in the gospel of Christ when I was three at some point. I don’t remember much of my life from that time at all, but interestingly enough I do remember the reasoning that persuaded me to trust. #1 The world was unfair (I saw this day to day) #2 The world was broken #3 I didn’t always do what was right #4 Others didn’t always do what was right #5 God was fair and just (as I’d learned and trusted from my local church and from Bible story books that talked about King Solomon, David, the Exodus, etc. So a few weeks after I’d been presented with the gospel and considering Jesus’ sacrifice in light of what I already believed about God’s character and the need for healing in the world, I accepted Christ. It wasn’t a rush of overwhelming assurance that Jesus was Messiah or the heavens opening and doves singing or anything like that; I wasn’t “given faith” from without.

        And various friends I have that converted as adults can also explain what brought them to the feet of God, even though for some it took many years of fighting against God first. Things like God’s power, beauty in the natural world, God’s love, God’s mercy, etc. These are all graces from God drawing people to come to Christ! But they are not the same as God effectually granting trust in Christ Himself to a select few.

      65. Jenai:
        You are too sweet! We may have warned your about RH…but since this is originally your post, perhaps you are being tenacious.

        You may have noticed that I did not respond to him (same old nonsense).

        You may also have noticed that he did not in any way deal with the question (he NEVER has) of when an “obviously seeking person” is “Calvinistically regenerated” in the process. Nope. They have no answer for this. Pagan Sergius Paulus asks to hear the Word of God. God-fearing Cornelius seeks. God-worshiping Lydia is in the place of prayer to hear the Word.

        On an on… including this very realistic example I gave.

        Any dealing with the obvious Calvinist-busting question of how can a “dead” man seek Christ for 4 years and then be “convinced” to come to faith?? Nope.

        Just the same old smoke screen of extraordinary Paul conversion. Besides…. the text never even tells us when Paul came to faith….and it CERTAINLY does NOT say Paul was given faith.

        But again….we expect nothing different from RH but to skirt the real question

      66. I am a bit tenacious as this is my original post, yes 😉

        But I also want to write a book on salvation at some point, and one of the sections will be going through verses commonly used in support of Calvinism. Another section will be addressing common philosophical questions/errors that people come to believe with certain soteriological views. So I do want to understand where that all is coming from as much as possible, not so much in hopes that I can convince any Calvinist a change of mind but for the sake of any Christians who are being wooed by Calvinists with those errant philosophies. And I don’t like strawman arguments, so I am trying to make sense of the nonsense as much as I can so I can address them fairly.

      67. Well I will be first in line to buy your book!

        You wont get much help from RH though since he only has a few verses: Isaiah 10, John 6, (mis-interpretation of) Eph 2:8-9, etc. Rinse. Repeat.

        Piper has a huge list of contradictions on his site…. and in the books “Dont Waste Your Life” and “Not By Sight” (by his colleague Jon Bloom and about 35 biblical stories of human faith —–never ONE TIME saying God gives faith).

      68. Then there is always the sly pretense that faith in Christ is different from belief in Christ. Believing in Christ – as the manifestation of God’s love and promises – is having faith in God’s love and promises. Faith and belief are one and the same. It is absurd to claim that one must have faith in order to believe. It is the same as saying ‘One must be given faith in order to have faith’ or ‘One must be given belief in order to believe’. It is nonsense, but required by the faulty flower.

      69. JR: “I also want to write a book on salvation at some point, and one of the sections will be going through verses commonly used in support of Calvinism. ”

        I am willing to help you with this.

      70. Jenai:
        You are too sweet! We may have warned your about RH…but since this is originally your post, perhaps you are being tenacious.

        You may have noticed that I did not respond to him (same old nonsense).

        You may also have noticed that he did not in any way deal with the question (he NEVER has) of when an “obviously seeking person” is “Calvinistically regenerated” in the process. Nope. They have no answer for this. Pagan Sergius Paulus asks to hear the Word of God. God-fearing Cornelius seeks. God-worshiping Lydia is in the place of prayer to hear the Word.

        On an on… including this very realistic example I gave.

        Any dealing with the obvious Calvinist-busting question of how can a “dead” man seek Christ for 4 years and then be “convinced” to come to faith?? Nope.

        Just the same old smoke screen of extraordinary Paul conversion. Besides…. the text never even tells us when Paul came to faith….and it CERTAINLY does NOT say Paul was given faith.

        But again….we expect nothing different from RH but to skirt the real question.

      71. JR: “When you trusted in Christ, was it because you saw a vision and God called out to you audibly from heaven? Doubtfully. ”

        I still had to be drawn by God in order to come to Christ. That was miraculous. Not as dramatic as with Paul, but still impressive.

        Then, “as Jesus states elsewhere, even someone rising from the dead or amazing miracles won’t convince some people, while still others are willing to just come trusting as little children on faith with no visible ‘proof.’”

        The difference between God’s drawing of one and not the other. (That’s one explanation.)

        Then, “I do remember the reasoning that persuaded me to trust….So a few weeks after I’d been presented with the gospel…”

        So, the order was: (1) hear the gospel, then (2) be persuaded. But you say, “I wasn’t “given faith” from without.” Guess you will be surprised when you get to heaven and learn what really happened.

        Then, “various friends I have that converted as adults can also explain what brought them to the feet of God,”

        It’s like Christ said, “The wind blows where it wishes, and you hear the sound of it, but cannot tell where it comes from and where it goes. So is everyone who is born of the Spirit.” My suspicion is that they could not explain everything that happened to them.

      72. Jenai:
        You mentioned seeing people rise from the dead and miracles ….and some people still not believing.

        The response to that from Calvinists is : “The difference between God’s drawing of one and not the other.”

        What is amazing is people are constantly “being scolded” in Scripture for not responding to the miracles. Christ sometime even “marvels” that they do not have faith.

        We are told the answer to that is “God’s drawing of one and not the other.”

        How ridiculous is that!?

        Calvinism: Christ purposely does not draw them …. and KNOWS that He “has not given them faith” and yet marvels that they dont have faith…. and says “if you only had faith” and “oh you of little faith…”

        There is just no biblical sense to this idea.

      73. FOH, it would also be exceedingly cruel if Jesus mocked or condemned people for not having any faith, when they were not ‘chosen’ to be given such a dear gift, and there was absolutely nothing they could do about it. And it would be disingenuous, if not downright silly, to pretend to be amazed that such and such had faith, when it was clearly given to them by the whim of God. Maybe he and God weren’t talking that day.

      74. TS00,
        Why are you worried about “exceedingly cruel”? Calvin mastered that pretty well with no problem. It fits the narrative.

      75. FOH writes, “Calvinism: Christ purposely does not draw them …”

        John 6, ““No one can come to Me unless the Father who sent Me draws him;”

        So, Calvinism: God purposely does not draw them … But you know this from your former involvement in Calvinism. So, why do you distort this point. Purposeful?

      76. rhutchin
        So, Calvinism: God purposely does not draw them … But you know this from your former involvement in Calvinism. So, why do you distort this point. Purposeful?

        br.d
        No distortion for the vast majority of humans on planet earth – whom Calvin’s god designed for eternal torment in the lake of fire.

        By I suppose a sly Calvinist could invent some semantic-trick.
        Perhaps calling it a special kind of “NON-SALVIFIC” drawing. :-]

      77. Oh you are so right br.d!

        Just put “non-salvific’ in front of anything….

        Piper says “Christ died for everyone in a ‘certain way.'”

        MacArthur say “God loves everyone in a ‘certain way.'”

        You even caught RH red-handed saying that “God offers salvation to everyone.”

        Numerous people jumped on the “That is not what ‘Limited Atonement’ means! There is no offer there since the Atonement was “Limited”.

        But…..who bothers with all that….. just add “non-Salvifically” on the end of anything you want. Take those sentences above and just add….. “wink wink….. but non-salvifically.”

        Good News!

      78. FOH writes, “You even caught RH red-handed saying that “God offers salvation to everyone.”

        When Christ commanded, ““Go into all the world and preach the gospel to every creature,” we know that the gospel was preached to “every creature.” We also know that no one could be saved absent faith and not all people who heard the gospel received faith. Jesus said, “All that the Father gives Me will come to Me,…” so those given by God to Christ are saved. There is nothing wrong with the statement I made.

      79. FOH writes, “You even caught RH red-handed saying that “God offers salvation to everyone.”

        Rh writes:
        “When Christ commanded, ““Go into all the world and preach the gospel to every creature,” we know that the gospel was preached to “every creature.” We also know that no one could be saved absent faith and not all people who heard the gospel received faith. Jesus said, “All that the Father gives Me will come to Me,…” so those given by God to Christ are saved. There is nothing wrong with the statement I made.”

        No, there is nothing wrong with the statement that God offers salvation to everyone . . . but, of course, it is utterly contrary to Calvinism. Not even the cleverest of wordsmiths can make ‘Limited atonement’ align with ‘God offers salvation to everyone’. Calvi-god could NOT offer a salvation that was never provided, without being a liar and deceiver; but then, it often appears that he is.

      80. FOH
        “You even caught RH red-handed saying that “God offers salvation to everyone.”

        br.d
        Calvinism is 99% SEMANTIC shell-games! :-]

      81. TS00 writes, “Not even the cleverest of wordsmiths can make ‘Limited atonement’ align with ‘God offers salvation to everyone’. ”

        Limited atonement refers to God’s intent to save His elect – thus God sent Christ to the cross to gain the salvation of His elect. God passes over the rest, doing nothing to bring them to salvation, and leaving them to do as they desire.

      82. rhutchin
        Limited atonement refers to God’s intent to save His elect – thus God sent Christ to the cross to gain the salvation of His elect. God passes over the rest, doing nothing to bring them to salvation, and leaving them to do as they desire.

        br,d
        Limited Atonement simply means:
        Calvin’s god designs the MANY for eternal torment in a lake of fire.
        And atonement is thus LIMITED to a select FEW who are not so designed.
        BTW: *ALL* desires are also designed.

      83. As you well know, it is far simpler for Calvinists to list what God has not meticulously ordained, decreed, controlled or by whatever means imaginable brought to pass, straight from his own originating ‘mind’: [ ].

      84. TS00
        As you well know, it is far simpler for Calvinists to list what God has not meticulously ordained, decreed, controlled or by whatever means imaginable brought to pass, straight from his own originating ‘mind’

        br.d
        Yup! And Calvinists – in order to retain a sense of biblical NORMALCY – practice *AS-IF* thinking.

        John Calvin
        -quote
        “Go about your office *AS-IF* nothing is pre-determined [by the THEOS] in any part”

        In other words:
        The SACRED TRUTH of Calvinism is that everything is pre-determined by the THEOS – and in every part
        But you go about your office *AS-IF* the SACRED-TRUTH is FALSE.

        Calvin teaches DOUBLE-THINK in order for the Calvinist to APPEAR to be aligned with scripture.

      85. FOH
        You even caught RH red-handed saying that “God offers salvation to everyone.”

        rhutchin
        There is nothing wrong with the statement I made.

        br.d
        Calvin’s god looks down at the vast majority of the human race he has designed specifically for eternal torment in a lake of fire:

        Look I’m offering you salvation – NOT! :-]

      86. TS00,
        That’s right. Kinda like this:

        Mr X has faith in something (Evolutionary accidents, Islam, Mormonism, Catholicism, etc).

        Johnny Baptist presents the Gospel to him (which includes the line “Christ died for you” —- included everywhere by MacArthur and Piper).

        Mr X says ….. that is stupid and foolishness.

        Mrs X (always the wiser gender!) says “Let’s just go with Johnny and Ethel Baptist to church next week on Father’s Day.”

        Mr X sits in the pew and say this is foolishness.

        Two guys he knows from his bowling league see him and ask him to a Dudes’ Night Bowl Bible Study.

        Mr X attends and bowls and hears a little bit of Bible study, which is foolishness (but he does know the cool dude teaching the study….so… he’s curious why he would believe this foolishness).

        Mr X attends the Dudes’ Bowl Study for 4 years. Cool leader explains the Gospel (including Christ took your place— which is said to everyone there).

        During these same 4 years Mrs X is going to church regularly… and goes also to MOPS, and several ladies’ retreats (she got to keep the lovely center-piece at her table!).

        During these 4 years Mr Cool is “persuading” Mr X (2 Cor 5:11). Mr Cool “reasons with” Mr X (Acts 17:2). Mr Cool “convinces” Mr X (Acts 28:23).

        After 4 and a half years, Mr and Mrs X make a public profession of faith and get baptized, having gone from “foolishness to being convinced.”

        They give their testimony in front of the whole church before being baptized and it is filled with the word “foolishness” “convincing” “persuading”….. and since this is a non-Calvinist church everyone says amen and claps.

        Everyone…. except three visiting, bearded, tattooed, young, white, male, college guys in the back. They are grieved that people would be allowed to “rob God of his glory.” At the coffee hour after the service they, in a snarky manner, insist that Mr X was actually “dead” and the Gospel was “foolishness” and he was given that faith.

        Mr X asks the angry-sounding YRR guys “When did He give me faith? Was I dead all those 4 years of Bible study and consistent searching of the Scriptures in discussion with friends and my wife? When—- at what point was I Calvinistically ‘regenerated’ and ‘made alive’ so I could then ‘freely choose’?”

        The angry young men quickly use their phones to go to Sproul’s site (one of the young men) and monergism.com (the 2 others).

        They say to Mr X….. “Your were regenerated nanoseconds before you believed and made the public profession.”

        Mr X, scratches his head (cuz he was actually present during the whole process) and asks, “What was I during those 4 years of Bible study, prayer, and seeking answers?”

        Angry young man #1 (the one with his left arm in full sleeve-tattoos, plus one tiny tat-cross on his neck) says to him with conviction and vigor….”You were ‘dead’ and a God-hater.”

        Mr X responds simply, “That’s Good News alright!”

        ……………… then after a moment of reflection…… Mr X adds, “Yep…. your ‘gospel’ is indeed foolishness!”

      87. Sorry if this posts twice. It says I posted…but I cannot find it.
        ——————————————–
        TS00,
        That’s right. Kinda like this:

        Mr X has faith in something (Evolutionary accidents, Islam, Mormonism, Catholicism, etc).

        Johnny Baptist presents the Gospel to him (which includes the line “Christ died for you” —- included everywhere by MacArthur and Piper).

        Mr X says ….. that is stupid and foolishness.

        Mrs X (always the wiser gender!) says “Let’s just go with Johnny and Ethel Baptist to church next week on Father’s Day.”

        Mr X sits in the pew and say this is foolishness.

        Two guys he knows from his bowling league see him and ask him to a Dudes’ Night Bowl Bible Study.

        Mr X attends and bowls and hears a little bit of Bible study, which is foolishness (but he does know the cool dude teaching the study….so… he’s curious why he would believe this foolishness).

        Mr X attends the Dudes’ Bowl Study for 4 years. Cool leader explains the Gospel (including Christ took your place— which is said to everyone there).

        During these same 4 years Mrs X is going to church regularly… and goes also to MOPS, and several ladies’ retreats (she got to keep the lovely center-piece at her table!).

        During these 4 years Mr Cool is “persuading” Mr X (2 Cor 5:11). Mr Cool “reasons with” Mr X (Acts 17:2). Mr Cool “convinces” Mr X (Acts 28:23).

        After 4 and a half years, Mr and Mrs X make a public profession of faith and get baptized, having gone from “foolishness to being convinced.”

        They give their testimony in front of the whole church before being baptized and it is filled with the word “foolishness” “convincing” “persuading”….. and since this is a non-Calvinist church everyone says amen and claps.

        Everyone…. except three visiting, bearded, tattooed, young, white, male, college guys in the back. They are grieved that people would be allowed to “rob God of his glory.” At the coffee hour after the service they, in a snarky manner, insist that Mr X was actually “dead” and the Gospel was “foolishness” and he was given that faith.

        Mr X asks the angry-sounding YRR guys “When did He give me faith? Was I dead all those 4 years of Bible study and consistent searching of the Scriptures in discussion with friends and my wife? When—- at what point was I Calvinistically ‘regenerated’ and ‘made alive’ so I could then ‘freely choose’?”

        The angry young men quickly use their phones to go to Sproul’s site (one of the young men) and monergism.com (the 2 others).

        They say to Mr X….. “Your were regenerated nanoseconds before you believed and made the public profession.”

        Mr X, scratches his head (cuz he was actually present during the whole process) and asks, “What was I during those 4 years of Bible study, prayer, and seeking answers?”

        Angry young man #1 says to him with conviction and vigor….”You were ‘dead’ and a God-hater.”

        Mr X responds simply, “That’s Good News alright!”

        ……………… then after a moment of reflection…… Mr X adds, “Yep…. your ‘gospel’ is indeed foolishness!”

      88. FOH
        Sorry if this posts twice. It says I posted…but I cannot find it.

        Yes – I saw it posted with date-time stamp June 22, 2019 11:33 AM
        But I also don’t find it when I text search for it on the sight.
        I might have to dig a little to find out why this happens.

        br.d

      89. “So, what changes? Faith comes by hearing. Thus, faith accounts for the change.”

        How does that make logical or grammatical sense? Remember, the Greek preposition here is ‘ek’ (translated ‘comes from’) – which means ‘out from [and] to’ or ‘out from within.’

        So *from* hearing [the gospel] *to* faith in the gospel.

        Faith (noun) cannot “account” for the change since it is the end result.

        That would be like saying, “Steam comes from water, therefore steam accounts for the change.” No, the heat applied to the water caused the production of steam. Steam was not ‘given’ to the water so it could boil.

        You are taking the end result of a change in state and applying it as necessary for the change to happen!

        Trusting in the gospel (putting faith in, being persuaded, etc.) accounts for the change from simple hearing to faith. Without the hearing/presentation, faith in the gospel cannot happen. Without believing (verb) the gospel, faith (noun) cannot happen.

        Nor does the gospel itself ‘make’ some trust in it by somehow conferring trust/faith itself. The gospel speaks of the promises of God and gives evidence for those promises. Humans are either persuaded or they are not at that time – some may change their minds later. The reasons they respond in trust or reject the guarantee are myriad (love of sin and self can make one not *want* to trust, for example; and trust may be simple like a child embracing a father or one might trust after reasoned consideration of all the evidences and testimonies, etc. The heart’s of people are like different types of soil with different levels of preparation/readiness. Some are ready to welcome the word with joy, but others are poised to reject any hint of there being a sovereign God who judges sin.

      90. JR: “That would be like saying, “Steam comes from water, therefore steam accounts for the change.””

        Steam comes from water and steam pushes the piston.
        Faith comes by hearing and faith pushes one to belief.

        Otherwise, I don’t understand the analogy you were setting up. What change did you have in mind?

        Then, “Without the hearing/presentation, faith in the gospel cannot happen. Without believing (verb) the gospel, faith (noun) cannot happen.”

        Agreed on the first statement. The second should be, “Without faith (noun) the gospel, belief (verb) cannot happen.”

        Then, “Nor does the gospel itself ‘make’ some trust in it by somehow conferring trust/faith itself.”

        Sure it does. The gospel conveys assurance and conviction (i.e., faith) thus trust, and because of that faith, one believes.

        The reasons they respond in trust or reject the guarantee are myriad but everything begins with a lack of faith. Had faith (assurance and conviction) been present, there would have been no rejection of the gospel.

        I read your comment a couple of times and still couldn’t put together your argument. Maybe someone else can distill it down to my level.

      91. rh writes:
        “I read your comment a couple of times and still couldn’t put together your argument. Maybe someone else can distill it down to my level.”

        Can’t happen. Not because you do not have the ‘ability’ to understand, but because you love your presuppositions (darkness), you do not want to ‘hear’ anything else. You do not ‘see’ because you do not want to see. You exchange what is said for your beloved presuppositions, thus you continue on your path. Just like anyone who rejects the gospel, because they love their sin.

      92. JR: “Which all does relate to the Calvinist position since TD holds that man is ‘unable’ to have faith in Christ,…so why is faith in a possible and very true thing impossible?”

        TD holds that man “DOES NOT” have faith (thus, UNABLE to accept salvation) in Christ and that such faith comes only through hearing the gospel. Faith is impossible until one hears the gospel and receives that faith we find described in Hebrews 11. We read of the importance of this faith in Hebrews, “For indeed the gospel was preached to us as well as to them; but the word which they heard did not profit them, not being mixed with faith in those who heard it.” If a person hears the gospel but does not receive faith, it is impossible for the person to be saved. Who determines that one person receives faith and another does not? God does. IF you can suggest other reasons to explain this, let’s hear them.

      93. rhutchin
        TD holds that man “DOES NOT” have faith (thus, UNABLE to accept salvation)

        br.d
        In Calvinism Total Depravity – (as with everything) – is the DIRECT CONSEQUENCE of Calvin’s god’s will.

      94. Jenai:

        Notice that in Calvinism what is a presupposition is the “faith is given”. Of course that is not said or even hinted at in the Bible, but a “given” for Calvinists. Once you have the idea of “foisted-faith” strong fixed in your brain, you cannot even hear what other people say.

        Despite years of posts and hundreds of verses provided, RH continues to talk about “foisted-faith” as if it is biblical and as if we all agree with that. Incredible. He cannot even hear the Word speaking….

        Paul tells us that faith comes by being “persuaded,” “convinced,” and “reasoned with” (all his words).

        Sergius Paulus would tell us it came from seeing amazing miracles.

        John mentions theses signs and wonders… 2:23 “While He was in Jerusalem at the Passover Feast, many people saw the signs He was doing and believed in His name.” 20:31 “these things were written that you might believe.”

        Exodus does too: “Aaron spoke all the words which the LORD had spoken to Moses. He then performed the signs in the sight of the people. So the people believed.” [Not foisted-faith…. just seeing and believing.]

        Jesus said it too “Because you have seen Me, you have believed….” [Not “Because I gave you faith you have believed.”].

        Matthew, Mark, and Luke show Jesus telling a woman about “her” faith “‘Daughter, take courage; your faith has made you well.’ At once the woman was made well.”

        The Gospels even record Jesus “marveling” at people’s faith and “marveling” at their lack of faith. [Hard to imagine if He is the One who foisted that faith on them??]

        Despite this (and hundreds more)…. Calvinists have such an ingrained concept of given faith (given to them by Mary-worshiping Augustine) that none of these verses say ANYTHING to them.

        They bring to the Scriptures that one must be “given” faith….even though most people would say that contradicts that idea of what faith means. I doubt that any people in the world (but Calvinists) see the idea of faith as “foisted-forced-absoluteness”.

        But again….. presuppositions are hard to give up.

      95. Rhutchin claims that we are born without faith. And, yet, a child believes in Santa Claus. A child believes in the Easter Bunny. A child believes in the Tooth Fairy. A child believes in the Bogeyman. These are perfect examples of someone believing (or having faith) in someone unseen (Hebrews 11:1). Of course, they can only believe in these things once they hear about them. So it is with Christ thru the spoken word (Romans 10:17). Everyone possess the ability to believe.

        Then…

        John 11:45-46 (NKJV)….
        Then many of the Jews who had come to Mary, and had seen the things Jesus did, believed in Him. But some of them went away to the Pharisees and told them the things Jesus did.

        John 12:17-19 (NKJV)….
        Therefore the people, who were with Him when He called Lazarus out of his tomb and raised him from the dead, bore witness. For this reason the people also met Him, because they heard that He had done this sign. The Pharisees therefore said among themselves, “You see that you are accomplishing nothing. Look, the world has gone after Him!”

        Just a casual reading of the book of John shows that as the evidence grew (from Jesus turning the water into wine, to the raising up of Lazarus), more and more were coming to Christ. The Pharisees knew that had get rid of the evidence, which is why they wanted to kill both Jesus and Lazarus.

        John 12:10-11 (NKJV)…
        But the chief priests plotted to put Lazarus to death also, because on account of him many of the Jews went away and believed in Jesus.

      96. Wait, you mean they had faith because of the miracles – as in, that’s why Jesus performed them, and questioned why any would not believe after the miracles he had given them? Even if the Calvinist tries to come back with ‘Those were just the means’, it makes no sense – did the miracles impart that magic, missing faith commodity in the select few? Then why did Jesus reprove those who did not accept the testimony of his works? In reality, did some believed what they saw wonderingly with their own eyes, or heard about, while others, not wanting to believe, brushed them off as nonsense. Just as they do still.

      97. Exactly TS00.

        RH often asks “Who would not accept a deal like that?” or say, “No one would turn down an offer like that.”

        This is why I have said that he must not have children. Man…. we constantly have the same batch of kids hearing the same offer (or threat!) and reacting differently. And that is kids raised the same way in the same family!

        I think that Thomas is a good example.

        He was a disciple. Followed Christ for 3 years. Should have been a good candidate for “given faith”. But no….. he insisted on touching and seeing. Then of course he believed. Obviously he was not “given faith”.

        What a silly idea.

        Christ did not “give him faith.” He invited him to touch Him so that Thomas could be “convinced” (that’s how Paul puts it— convincing people).

      98. phillip writes, “Of course, they can only believe in these things once they hear about them.”

        That;s what I said, If they can only believe after hearing, then they were not born with it. So, we agree??

      99. rhutchin
        That;s what I said, If they can only believe after hearing, then they were not born with it. So, we agree??

        br.d
        If Calvin’s god doesn’t one to be ELECT
        Then Calvin’s god does NOT PERMIT one to hear
        And Calvin’s god does NOT PERMIT one to believe.
        Its just that simple.

      100. “JR: “You have been starting with the assumption that Total Depravity is true (and some other assumptions related to it) in order to argue for its various facets.”

        RH: Two presuppositions here: (1) a person is born without faith; (2) people are born unrighteous. I assert (1) and (2) to be true. As a shorthand, this is labelled TD.”

        #1 is fine, since obviously no one is born with faith, as no human has the mental capacity to even understand basic words as a newborn let alone trust in a gospel presentation. I doubt anyone will argue with you on that.

        I would also agree with #2. Since no one is born having done any good deeds yet, nor have they received the imputed righteousness of Christ, nor have they been taken to a court of law as a defendant and won their case so as to be declared just/righteous by the court, nor have they interacted with society in ethical ways yet, it can easily be claimed and agreed that no one is ‘born righteous.’ The baby has also touched human uncleanness, so would be ‘unclean.’

        [It is possible Jesus’ sacrifice can cover the sins of the unborn and very young, however, which in a sense would make babies born with *imputed* righteousness until old enough to be aware of their sin, but not a righteousness of themselves.]

        But those two premises are not “shorthand for TD!” No Calvinist simply means those two premises by TD; to claim so is either very disingenuous or you do not understand the theory of Total Depravity. All Christians agree that all men (save Christ when on Earth) sin (Rom 3:10-23), that sin corrupts every aspect of our being, such as flesh, heart, mind, etc, (Mark 7:21-23), and that man cannot save himself (Psalm 60:10-12, Isa 63:5-6). All Christians would agree that humans are not “born” with faith or righteousness of themselves.

        But the theory of TD/TI carries the further premise that man is so tainted by sin that he cannot even accept the offer of Christ’s salvation: he is “unable” to respond to the gospel in faith so as to be graciously granted Christ’s deliverance from sin (contrary to scripture, which asks us to believe: Rom 10:9-13, John 3:14-21, Luke 11:5-13, Heb 11:13-16, Gal 3:24, Deut 30:11-14, etc).

        And because of that presupposition that man is “inable/unable” to respond in faith, Calvinists have to solve why anyone believes at all, such as holding that spiritual regeneration must occur *before* one believes to allow the person to believe (contrary to scripture which states we receive the Holy Spirit after we believe, not before: Gal 3:2-3, Gal 3:10-14, Eph 1:11-14, II Cor 5:17, etc).

        “You agree on (1). On (2), you say, “all that is necessary to be counted as unrighteous is the breaking of a single law.” If your position is thta people are born righteous and become unrighteous when they sin, then you disagree with TD – and that means that you understand what the Calvinist means by TD.”

        I think you misunderstand my point, there. A court declaring someone unrighteous means it was determined by the court to be a law-breaker. That doesn’t mean they were ‘born righteous’ – the court only needs to make a judgement when someone is accused of a crime. But my term could have been clearer: “lawbreaker” is better such as in James 2:11.

        [Righteousness is a broad term that can be used to refer to several different things in scripture (serving God, having the imputed righteousness of Christ, under no penalty of law, obeying God, blameless, innocent, approved by God, upright virtuous, morally correct acts, ethical conduct, solicitude for the weak/helpless, just, merciful, doing what is right, etc.) You can get a taste of how broad it is here:
        https://biblehub.com/hebrew/6662.htm
        https://biblehub.com/greek/1342.htm
        http://jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/12758-right-and-righteousness

        This broad range for the word, especially it’s subtle changes in general meaning/application over the writing of the Bible, can easily lead to some things looking like contradictions when God says ‘no one is righteous’ in one place but then talks about righteous (ethical) people in others, when really it’s just the term is being used in different ways (e.g. declared fully just by God vs. an ethical/upright person or vs. a person who believes the promise and God credits with righteousness)]

        ” I disagree where you say, “This is a circular conclusion, as you assumed total depravity to try to prove Total Depravity to show why Total Depravity was not an assumption….”

        Disagreeing that something is circular reasoning doesn’t make it not circular reasoning. Many people who employ circular reason don’t actually realize the fallacy they are engaging in – if they did, they would hopefully avoid it or go back to the drawing board to strengthen the argument.
        https://www.thoughtco.com/circular-reasoning-petitio-principii-1689842

        “JR: Then, “#6 – “and until people receive faith, they cannot be made righteous”
        That’s yet another presupposition/assertion. It doesn’t follow from your other points or from scripture.”

        RH: This is based on Romans 5, “having been justified by faith,” where being justified is being made righteous. Thus, I agree where you say, “Gal 3 would be a great chapter to read, here. Those who hear with faith receive the Spirit and are justified by God.”

        Rom 5 says we are justified by faith, yes. I agree with the verse. I agree with Gal 3 as well. But does ‘justified by faith’ mean the same thing as ‘God must give a person faith?’ vs. the alternative of someone having faith because they responded to the gospel in trust? Note that you are reading your presupposition into the verse to prove your presupposition – circular reasoning.

        Read Rom 4! There is no chapter break in the original. Our justification in faith comes directly after this passage:

        “As it is written: “I have made you a father of many nations.” He is our father in the presence of God, in whom he believed, the God who gives life to the dead and calls into being what does not yet exist. Against all hope, Abraham in hope believed and so became the father of many nations, just as he had been told, “So shall your offspring be.”Without weakening in his faith, he acknowledged the decrepitness of his body (since he was about a hundred years old) and the lifelessness of Sarah’s womb. Yet he did not waver through disbelief in the promise of God, but was strengthened in his faith and gave glory to God, being fully persuaded that God was able to do what He had promised. That is why “it was credited to him as righteousness.”Now the words “it was credited to him” were written not only for Abraham, but also for us, to whom righteousness will be credited—for us who believe in Him who raised Jesus our Lord from the dead. He was delivered over to death for our trespasses and was raised to life for our justification.
        *Therefore,* since we have been justified through faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom we have gained access by faith into this grace in which we stand; and we rejoice in the hope of the glory of God.”

        Does anything in that passage say “Abraham was given believe by God” or “strengthened in the faith God gave him” or “Did not waver because such a thing was impossible because the belief was effectually given by God” or “fully persuaded because God gave him the actual effectual persuasion” or imply such a reading? No! Does Gal 3 say people hear with faith because God effectually gives them the faith when they here? No!

        One must have faith for God to declare them righteous (or be perfectly sinless like Jesus, but humans can’t take that route) – and God only declares them righteous because He graciously grants believers the imputed righteousness of Christ, not because the faith itself is a meritorious work of righteousness that somehow overcomes in a karmic manner all the sins one has committed previously.)

        “JR: Then, “It’s a serious out of context misuse of Gen:5 to try and use it to support the theory of Total Depravity.”
        RH: Genesis 5 is an example to illustrate TD. That Noah was righteous requires that Noah have had faith and the source of faith would have been God through His word to Noah.”

        You are bringing your presupposition about what it takes to be righteous (being effectually given faith by God) into the text, so claiming it means that Noah being called righteous means he had been given faith by God. You are then using that verse as a support text for TD as to “why” man has to be given faith by God and cannot respond in faith on his own. That is classic circular reasoning.

        Righteousness is a broad term, as already mentioned. Righteousness in all it’s uses in the OT does not automatically carry “having faith in Christ” or “having the imputed righteousness of Christ” or “believing the promise” – sometimes it just means upright living or ethical behavior or followers of God in general, such as the Israelites; and nowhere does scripture use it in the sense of “having been given faith by God!”

        Let’s look at a part of Gen 6 “The Lord saw how great the wickedness of the human race had become on the earth, and that every inclination of the thoughts of the human heart was only evil all the time….But Noah found favor in the eyes of the Lord.These are the records of the generations of Noah. Noah was a righteous man, blameless in his generation; Noah walked with God”

        Noah was just/ethical; his contemporaries had nothing to blame him about (e.g. legally or socially. No murder, gossip, theft, etc.); he’s contrasted with the “wicked;” he walked faithfully with God.

        We can assume that the reason he tried to walk in an upright manner was his knowledge of right/wrong from God and his relationship with God, sure. He also certainly was obedient to God’s command to build the ark. God was in that way the source of his behavior, yes, but because Noah chose to submit to God’s revealed desires and to follow God. Imagine God’s commands as fresh spring water which Noah saw and chose to drink of, while everyone else was busy digging their own muddy wells or stealing from their neighbor’s muddy well to drink.

        God was not the source in the sense of effectually giving Noah faith or somehow irresistibly making Noah follow him, such as forcing the water down Noah’s throat while he was asleep. Where in the passage do you see it saying “God gave Noah faith; Noah was blameless because God made him blameless; God effectually made Noah walk by his side; God effectually made Noah to trust in his command to build his ark,” etc.

        The wicked in the passage were not effectually made to be wicked; Noah was not effectually made to follow God. He wasn’t effectually “given” faith.

      101. TS00 writes, “As long as one accepts the foundational concept of Total Depravity, or Inability,…”

        …that central concept being that no person is born with faith and cannot receive faith except through the hearing of the word. Until the non-Calvinist can undo that central doctrine, Calvinism will prevail and the empty arguments of TS00 will accomplish nothing lasting.

        Then, “Total Depravity, meaning a walking corpse kind of ‘dead in sin’ is a severe and unjustified reading of scripture.”

        Here, TSOO, knowing that TD is built on a faithless humanity and by corollary attributes spiritual deadness to a faithless humanity seeks to ridicule the clear truth of Scripture. Why doesn’t he just address the real issue – the necessity of faith both to both salvation and godly living.

      102. Total Ignoring of the countless explanations ml pthat faith is not a ‘thing’ (noun) that one receives but the noun referent to the verb ‘believe’, which is a chosen response to the presentation of alleged truth.

        He who hears God’s revelation of who he is and what he promises has a choice: he will either believe and receive the declared revelation, or he will deny and reject its veracity.

      103. “…faith is not a ‘thing’ (noun) that one receives but the noun referent to the verb ‘believe’, which is a chosen response to the presentation of alleged truth.”

        That’s a great way of putting it.

        If faith were a physical object, then one might could claim something like A is needed for B: “One needs a snorkel to then go snorkeling.” But faith is a concept, specifically, the persuasion that something is true, assured, or guaranteed. Saying “the persuasion is that something is true is necessary to be persuaded that something is true” doesn’t make sense if one is using it in terms of sequence or precedence. At best it is a tautology, like “love is necessary to love.” It is not of the form “A is necessary to then get A” or “Object A is necessary for action B.” Believes in Jn 3:16 and elsewhere just means to “hold (verb) faith (noun).” In Greek that is combined into one verb; pisteuó; to be persuaded of/place confidence in/believe, etc. “Believing” is often the translator’s choice for holding faith, since “holding faith” sounds a bit clunky in English.

        Unlike a snorkel which is a physical object necessary to then do the action of snorkeling, if one wanted, faith (noun) and faith (verb) automatically go together with no sequence of time or logic precedence. Believing is just the state of having faith. If one has the persuasion that something is true, one believes it. If one feels love (noun) for another person, they love (verb) that person. If one has mental activity, then one is thinking. If one is thinking, that one has mental activity. Etc.

        [Now, faith as a noun is not always used in scripture of personal faith, but is sometimes used as a generic reference to Christian belief or the gospel message as a whole. Context and sometimes grammar generally make clear whether personal faith or “The Faith” is meant.]

        We receive the promises of God, such as the indwelling Spirit, imputed righteousness, eternal life, etc. by faith (Gal 3, etc.) It is not faith itself that we effectually receive from without.

        [I do realize that II Pet 1:1 is often translated “received a faith” – but this is not the typical Greek word for receive used elsewhere in scripture when talking about receiving righteousness or the Spirit by faith. The connotations are not those of accepting/taking a gift or having something irresistibly forced/given, but “to be allotted” or determined by lot, in context showing that the Gentiles, not just the Jews, had been determined by God to have a share in salvation and for believing Gentiles to receive the Holy Spirit, and that Jewish believers were not superior to the Gentiles, and possibly a sense that the ministry to/of Gentile believers was as important as that of the first believers. See Acts 11:17, Acts 15:8, Acts 1:17, I Pet 1:7, etc. in their various contexts.

        Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges
        “It was in and by the righteousness of God, the absence in Him of any “respect of persons,” that Jew and Gentile had been placed on an equality. So taken the words present a suggestive parallel with Acts 10:34; Acts 15:8-9.”]

      104. JR, responding to TS00, “Believes in Jn 3:16…”

        The Greek term is a participle, and would be best translated as “believing ones.” Thus, only the believing ones (whosoever believes) are given eternal life. The issue in John 3:16 are the unbelieving ones. If God loves them and gave His son for them, what does He do with them? Does God condemn people He loves and for whom He gave His son? Yes, people will answer – because they did not believe. Then, how is it that one believes and one does not. In John 10, referring to the Jews, Jesus said, “you do not believe, because you are not of My sheep. My sheep hear My voice, and I know them, and they follow Me; and I give eternal life to them, and they shall never perish;” This reinforces that which Jesus said in John 6, “All that the Father gives Me shall come to Me, and the one who comes to Me I will certainly not cast out.”

        Then, “If faith were a physical object, then one might could claim something like A is needed for B: “One needs a snorkel to then go snorkeling.” But faith is a concept, specifically, the persuasion that something is true, assured, or guaranteed.”

        Faith, the translation of the noun, is a tangible concept – it is real. It is the “persuasion that something is true, assured, or guaranteed” or “assurance and conviction” as Hebrews 11 defines it. I agree that “saying ‘the persuasion is that something is true is necessary to be persuaded that something is true” doesn’t make sense” Thus, the Calvinist follows the translators in saying that faith (being persuaded) is necessary to believing (action taken consequent to that faith or persuasion). The distinction is between a noun normally translated as “faith, a verb normally translated as “believe/believing.

      105. rh writes:
        ” Thus, the Calvinist follows the translators in saying that faith (being persuaded) is necessary to believing (action taken consequent to that faith or persuasion).”

        Still makes no sense. Faith is not a ‘thing’ which can be received, as all of Jesus’ references to faith show. He is surprised at some men’s greater faith, and displeased at others’ lack thereof, neither of which would make sense if man was just some passive recipient of faith upon God’s whim. Nor is having faith/believing an action.

        What, in rhutchin’s definition of faith, is one being persuaded of, and what, consequently, does one believe? As always, it is just word salad crafted to muddy the waters. The pretense that faith and believing are two different things is only necessitated by faulty presuppositions. Having faith in and believing God’s promises are one and the same thing, as most would understand from the various usages. Of course one must look past the English words, as they are merely translations by imperfect men with their own presuppositions.

        Having scriptural faith is believing in who God is and what he says, as Hebrews explains. The two English words are synonyms, in scripture as well as other usage. What, one wonders, is this imaginary substance Calvinists call faith, that differs from belief? Having faith is not being regenerated so one can believe, as Calvinism appears to suggest; regeneration is God’s promised gift of making new in response to man’s faith. Only those who believe receive this gift of life.

        But rhutchin understands quite well how the vast majority of believers interpret such things, even when he feigns ignorance.

      106. But wait….. there’s more!

        Faith is what you say TS00 and ….. we also know this….

        Christ “marveled because of their unbelief.” [Just give them faith!]

        Christ weeps about their unbelief [Just give them faith!]

        Christ rebukes his followers for their unbelief. [Just give them faith!]

        Jesus marvels (again) AT faith “When Jesus heard these things, he marveled at him, and turning to the crowd that followed him, said, “I tell you, not even in Israel have I found such faith.” Luke 7:9 (Calvinist ESV). [Didn’t He give the faith?…. why marvel?]

        Jesus is marveling (amazed) and is saying that He “found” this man’s faith.

        None of these make any sense if faith is the object that is handed out by Christ.

      107. Scripture provides all the examples we need!

        It’s just that some people filter obvious stories and narratives through a pre-disposed lens ….given them the answer they came to the passage to find (and of course rendering the passage meaningless, or worse a mockery).

      108. TS00 writes, “Having faith is not being regenerated so one can believe, as Calvinism appears to suggest; regeneration is God’s promised gift of making new in response to man’s faith.”

        It is statements like this that make one wonder if you even understand Calvinism. Regeneration, per John 3 (being born again) enables one to both “see” and “enter” the kingdom of God. The proclamation of the gospel reveals the kingdom that one has been enabled to see and enter Through that faith conveyed by the gospel, one has assurance and conviction and enters the kingdom of God – is saved.

      109. The Calvinist thinks he was eternally immutably predestined as special to God and to be born as among the few to get a nature that irresistibly would play out that special status. He thinks he was born already an elect one, a sheep of God’s fold, beloved.

        So much for their “worm theology”, which is a smoke screen, imo, for what seems like a latent narcissism theology. It’s like hearing them say, “I’m connected to God eternally immutably and you reprobates who never were loved by God like me are not!”

        There are some, I believe, who don’t see how their chosen theology makes them appear… and how it also makes God look very partial, even though He clearly says He is without partiality when it comes to providing and offering salvation.

        Romans 2:11 NKJV — For there is no partiality with God.
        Romans 11:32 NKJV — For God has committed them all to disobedience, that He might have mercy on all.
        Psalm 145:8-9 NKJV — The LORD is gracious and full of compassion, Slow to anger and great in mercy. The LORD is good to all, And His tender mercies are over all His works.
        John 1:1,4,7,9 NKJV — In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God…. In Him was life, and the life was the light of men…. that all through him might believe….That was the true Light which gives light to every man coming into the world.
        John 3:17 NKJV — For God did not send His Son into the world to condemn the world, but that the world through Him might be saved.

      110. Beautiful. This is the gospel that brings repentance, hope and peace. The chosen people theology was long ago declared untrue, yet many still cling to it. We are all loved, and God desires that all turn from wickedness, embrace his freely offered pardon and receive everlasting life. If you did not understand this clearly, O Calvinist friend, please ponder the difference between your gospel and the true gospel.

      111. You know I agree Brian.

        The problem is that Calvinists have the same Bible we do. They just take those verses you listed and make them mean something different than we do. That also take 30 verses or so and use them as a filter for the whole Bible. Certain things “must” be true (presuppositions) and all else must be made to fit that filter.

        But the bottom line is that they spend their entire focus proving and declaring that the message of the Bible is:

        God loves a tiny portion of humanity and “made-certain” their salvation (and of course made certain the damnation all of the rest) “for His Glory.” He damns “God-haters” (but He created them to be that way….”for His glory”).

        At its base, it is not a very “glorious” message and certainly NOT “Good News” ….unless you are one of the very, very few.

      112. Frankly, I don’t see it as good news even for the elect. Who would want to spend eternity with a god like that? Who can look him honestly in the face and say, ‘Hey, I’m perfectly fine with you damning my grandmother, neighbor and best friend. No really, what glory that demonstrates.’ No one.

      113. FOH writes, “That also take 30 verses or so and use them as a filter for the whole Bible. Certain things “must” be true….”

        Yes, the Scripture must be true and the Scripture filters out untruth.

      114. brianwagner writes, “He was born already an elect one, a sheep of God’s fold, beloved.”

        As Paul describes it, “…when God who had set me apart, even from my mother’s womb, and called me through His grace, was pleased to reveal His Son in me, that I might preach Him among the Gentiles, I did not immediately consult with flesh and blood,…”

        Then, ‘It’s like hearing them say, “I’m connected to God eternally immutably and you reprobates who never were loved by God like me are not!””

        I guess that your rendition of Paul’s attitude toward the reprobate. It’s not how the Calvinist sees Paul.

      115. Paul being set apart for service for the sake of God’s eternal plan, even from birth, is not the same thing as every person who ever lived being either decreed to be regenerated/given faith so they definitely will be saved or decreed to never have faith or even be able to respond in faith so that they definitely will be condemned.

        Scripture shows at times specific people set apart for a crucial time (Prophets, judges, Christ, etc.) Even those prophets are shown with the ability to obey or disobey – even with Jesus it is heavily implied that He technically could ask for a legion of angels to rescue Him or escape the cross, but that He will not and submits to the Father instead for the sake of the joy set before Him/eternal plan of redemption. But, in the lives of those people we see God work in special, out of the ordinary ways such as visions, burning bushes, sending angels, etc. in order to show them their call to service and aid them during it. None of those prophets or people claimed to call themselves or set themselves apart (which was one of the errors of the Pharisees, – they appointed themselves as the religious guards of Israel.) Paul didn’t create the vision on the Damascus road, it was revealed to him by God that the one he persecuted was Christ.

        Paul being set apart is yet another example of Calvinists using examples of the particular (events scripture shows as unusual/different from the norm) to somehow represent the usual (and also going beyond what the text explicitly says to apply it to personal salvation rather than in it’s context of service/ministry.)

      116. JR: “Paul being set apart for service for the sake of God’s eternal plan, even from birth, is not the same thing as every person who ever lived being either decreed to be regenerated/given faith so they definitely will be saved or decreed to never have faith or even be able to respond in faith so that they definitely will be condemned.”

        No, but it does tell us that God had a plan and Paul was part of His plan. What was God’s plan for Paul, “I might preach Him among the Gentiles.” In Ephesians, Paul adds this,”you can understand my insight into the mystery of Christ…the Gentiles are fellow heirs and fellow members of the body, and fellow partakers of the promise in Christ Jesus through the gospel, of which I was made a minister…” Then, Paul writes, “He chose us in Him before the foundation of the world,” Of Israel, Paul writes, “For they are not all Israel who are descended from Israel;..That is, it is not the children of the flesh who are children of God, but the children of the promise are regarded as descendants.” Paul reminds us that Isaiah had foretold this, “Isaiah cries out concerning Israel: “Though the number of the Israelites be like the sand by the sea, only the remnant will be saved.”

        To this plan, we can add all the prophecies on the OT concerning the coming of Christ and all the prophecies in the NT of the second coming of Christ and of the end. We can reasonably conclude that God has not left anything to chance, but “works all things after the counsel of His will.” Calvinists appeal to the whole of Scripture not just, “Paul being set apart is yet another example of Calvinists using examples of the particular (events scripture shows as unusual/different from the norm) to somehow represent the usual (and also going beyond what the text explicitly says to apply it to personal salvation rather than in it’s context of service/ministry.)” Your conclusion betrays a bias against Calvinism that is not warranted.

      117. “No, but it does tell us that God had a plan and Paul was part of His plan.”

        No one disagrees that God has a plan. The crucial difference between Calvinists and non-Calvinists is that for the Calvinist the ‘plan’ includes the predetermined destiny of every individual (and for many Calvinists, every thought and action of that individual as well): that a select few would be assured to become believers (by some method such as regeneration, being given faith, irresistible grace, etc.) while the rest are predetermined to stay in their condemned state with no hope of redemption. For the non-Calvinist, God’s eternal plan regarding salvation refers to how God has intervened in history to create the nation of Israel, set apart prophets and priests and kings, set the boundaries and rise and fall of nations, and send the Redeemer at the right time in history to die on the cross. For individuals, God’s plan is that any who respond to the gospel in faith/believe in Christ will be graciously pardoned, forgiven, baptized, adopted, reconciled, etc.

        “What was God’s plan for Paul, “I might preach Him among the Gentiles. In Ephesians, Paul adds this,”you can understand my insight into the mystery of Christ…the Gentiles are fellow heirs and fellow members of the body, and fellow partakers of the promise in Christ Jesus through the gospel, of which I was made a minister…””

        Yes. God specifically called Paul into ministry that he would go to spread the gospel to the Gentiles. The ministry of Jesus’ apostles was primarily, though not entirely, to the Jews. Paul established countless churches, and the Holy Spirit even intervened at times to guide him or even translate him to where God wanted.

        “Then, Paul writes, “He chose us in Him before the foundation of the world,”

        Yes. Read Eph 1 in it’s context. Look at the audience – the “faithful in Christ Jesus.” God chose the faithful in Christ Jesus, before the foundation of the world, to be made Holy. The Ephesian church was also included in Christ, hence predestined to be adopted and made Holy and conformed to Christ, etc., when they believed. God chose those in Christ (believers) to be holy and predestined those in Christ (believers) to be adopted. Eph 1:1-14 does not state that God predestined anyone to be, or not to be, a believer or to be in Christ!

        God also seals those in Christ (the faithful in Christ Jesus whom Paul is addressing) with the Holy Spirit as a down payment of our future inheritance of eternal life.

        Predestination deals with God’s omnipotence and omniscience. The word itself means to “to mark out beforehand’; to pre-establish limits and boundaries. Specifically, this word references how God set limits/boundaries/laws upon everything before creation. He set the laws of physics, placed the boundaries of the sea, determined the eternal plan by which mankind would be saved, (Prov 8:22-31, Eph 1:3-10, Eph 3:10-11, Job 38:33, Rom 8:29, etc), set the rules by which deliverance and pardon are obtained (Num 25:22-29, Jer 26:1-6, II Chron 7:14, John 3:16, Heb 10:11-18, Luke 4:14-21, Heb 9:22, Matt 5:29, Isa 45:22-25), etc.

        In the plan of salvation, God also predestined it to include the gentiles, not just the Jews (Eph 3:2-12, Rom 3:21-31, Rom 9:1-26, Rom 15:5-13, John 1:11-13, Isa 45:9-10, Rom 9:11-16, etc). It is this aspect of predestination that Eph 1 deals with in-depth.

        God elected a people for Himself, the body of Christ, both Jew and Gentile. (I Pet 2:7-10, II Pet 1:2, Rom 1:1-3, II Tim 2:1-13, etc). His calling this people is by His grace, not by any of our own works (I Pet 2:9-10, Eph 2:8-10, Rom 11:1-6). The Jews thought they alone were the ‘Chosen People’ of God, and were resistant to the idea of the Gentiles being brought into God’s flock as well. In context, Paul is speaking here of how God pre-determined before time that both Jew and Gentiles would be brought into the kingdom of God through Christ; any who would put their hope in Christ (Eph 1:11-14).

        “Of Israel, Paul writes, “For they are not all Israel who are descended from Israel;..That is, it is not the children of the flesh who are children of God, but the children of the promise are regarded as descendants.” Paul reminds us that Isaiah had foretold this, “Isaiah cries out concerning Israel: “Though the number of the Israelites be like the sand by the sea, only the remnant will be saved.””

        Yes – true Israel is of the promise given to Abraham, NOT ethnic descent from Abraham. God planned that inclusion in Israel be by faith in the promise, not by ethnicity or works of the flesh. Nothing in Rom 9 or 11 hints that God pre-picked who would be given faith in that promise while others were pre-doomed to never be able to believe the promise.

        Rather, again, we see that the grafting in of Gentiles is by belief, but that ethnic Israelites can be broken off due to unbelief.

        “To this plan, we can add all the prophecies on the OT concerning the coming of Christ and all the prophecies in the NT of the second coming of Christ and of the end.”

        The plan of salvation being offered and accomplished by Christ and granted to believers, yes. The Calvinist plan of individuals being pre-chosen by God, apart from faith but just by God’s choice, to definitely get faith and believe or definitely never be able to have faith? No – nowhere in those prophecies of the coming of Christ and the end.

        The nation of Israel was elect due to God’s own choice (Ezek 16:5-7, Deut 10:15, Isa 45:4). Israel entered the covenant with God to confirm this (Deut 29:9-15), but they still rebelled, and thought salvation was by works and not the promise (Jer 4:22).

        While to the Jews it seemed as if God allowing the gentiles in would be changing his mind or contrary to His promise, the offer of salvation to the gentiles had truly been God’s plan from the start. Just as God had fore-determined the boundaries and subdivisions of the promised land, so He had fore-determined the purpose, plan, and promises of salvation, the structure and limits of the true church under the headship of Christ (I Pet 1:3-9, Rom 9:6-26, I Pet 2:10).

        In similar manner, we didn’t chose the way of salvation (God did), nor did we chose our own gifts or ministries (God did). We are, however, to have faith and follow (John 15:16, John 12:25-26).

        In Eph 1; predestination shows that Christians are the church, the body of Christ (Col 1:18, I Cor 12:12, Col 3:14-16, Eph 4:14-16). All those in Christ (those with faith) are the ‘elect’, those predestined to be holy, the people of God joined together under the headship of Christ (1 Peter 2:4-9). We all become part of the elect/the church through faith; and those with faith are made holy; a plan God predestined long before time, Israel, or the law.

        ” We can reasonably conclude that God has not left anything to chance, but “works all things after the counsel of His will.””

        That isn’t a reasonable conclusion. “Chance” is merely a set of finite variables operating inside of God’s created universe and the natural laws He made – laws He can supersede as needed. Does God setting the boundary of the sea mean He “must” push around every water molecule and sculpt every wave Himself lest “chance” somehow derail His boundaries? Does God creating every nation of men from Adam, to inhabit the whole Earth, determining the appointed times of the nations and the boundaries of their lands, in the hopes that men would seek him (Acts 17:26-28) mean that God *must* control the individual destinies, individual thoughts, individual actions, etc. of all individuals, to the point of ensuring that many just can’t seek him at all or find Him, lest they somehow overturn His boundaries?

        Of course not. The actions, thoughts, and movements of man are finite variables, not infinite ones. And the universe is not a closed system, since God can operate on it at will (such as to perform miracles, call prophets, servants, etc.)

        As for God working all things after the counsel of His will doesn’t mean He *determines* all things as He pleases. For one, the Greek word for working here is more like “engaged in” or energizing – that is, He is a present God, not a God from a distance, who is actively involved in the affairs of men and working to bring about His sovereign plan over history. God planned the promises, salvation, the reconciliation and adoption of believers, etc. according to His own council, purpose, and will – not according to any work or wisdom of man, before He created time. Jesus, the lamb slain from the ‘foundation of the world’ (Rev 13:8, John 1:1), would enter history at the proper time to die for our sins and bring all who believed into His body, the church (Gal 4:3-7, Rom 10:4, Col 1:15-23, I Pet 1:19-20, Eph 1:4, II Tim 1:8-9, John 3:16-18). Then, eternal life will be granted us (our inheritance) at the end of the ages, when all things are fulfilled in Christ and He presents the church to Himself as a radiant bride (Eph 1:9-11, Eph 5:25-33, Titus 1:1). The council of God’s will can quite easily include the will to give libertarian freedom to man, it is not proof against it!

        “Calvinists appeal to the whole of Scripture”

        Citing a lot of out-of-context verse references and appealing to presuppositions to interpret them, while simultaneously ignoring other sections of scripture, is not appealing to the whole of scripture. You cannot synthesize a cohesive and Biblical model without first analyzing all the component parts. And to analyze a passage or scripture, you have to start with context, audience, Greek or Hebrew word meaning and grammar, parallel text, literary category, etc. You also need to avoid presuppositions that may falsely color an interpretation, avoid reading every possible connotation into a term or phrase without checking context, avoid over-literalizing figurative language, etc. If two passages seem to contradict when all this is done, go over them again and see if anything has been missed. When putting the parts together, one has to avoid reading in more presuppositions or using fallacious reasoning.

        I reject Calvinism because over the past 15+ years I’ve analyzed the various verses used to “prove” the view. The majority have turned out to be out of context, or reliant on a presupposition not even hinted at in scripture but more at home in Greek philosophy. A few are possible interpretations, but over-extrapolated, so while those verses don’t directly contradict the view, they don’t support the view to the exclusion of other possibilities. Still others over-literalize figurative language, even when it contradicts other passages. Etc.

        For a non-Calvinist example: in the U.S.A., a pre-millenial, pre-trib rapture view has become very popular and one of the main ‘teachers’ on it currently is Walvoord. Before I started studying in depth, it was the theory I leaned towards since it is the one I had been exposed to growing up, and most of the Bible notes I had seen promoted that view. But I took his list of 100+ support verses and started going through them to test the theory anyway, since my church group was going to start studying Revelations and I wanted to research it for myself. Only, I didn’t find what I expected! I had three highlighters – green for in-context verses which strongly supported the view; yellow for verses which were ambiguous enough that they could support the view but could just as easily support others, or verses which really didn’t clearly speak to the topic at all; and red for verses that within their own text/context seemed to contradict the view. I expected mostly green; what I got was mostly yellow, no greens, and a handful of reds.

        What was interesting though as my local church in sermons and in Bible Studies looked at eschatology (from a completely biased and one-sided perspective) for a while was just how many people thought the *number* of verses Walvoord used was the same thing as “proof” – or held the idea that because Walvoord could create a “nice system where everything is explained and put in a box (my church group has a lot of engineers, lol)” that was the same thing as being “Biblically sound.”

        Calvinist offers a system-in-a-box, which is very appealing to many, and on the surface can refer to many verses as ‘support’ – it’s only when those verses are analyzed *without* presupposing Calvinism as true that countless problems with context, word-use, logic, scriptural harmony, etc. show up.

        “Your conclusion betrays a bias against Calvinism that is not warranted.”

        Not being willing to take logical fallacies as sound reasoning or take out-of-context scripture as “proof” doesn’t mean I am letting bias color my conclusions.

        By analogy, imagine this argument:

        Albert: “The ice cream shop owner on the corner, Doug, determines the flavors of ice-cream everyone will purchase.”
        Tom: “Why do you think that?”
        Albert: “He only offers two flavors.”
        Tom: “That means choices are limited, not that everyone has to pick what Albert chooses.”
        Albert: “But he owns the shop. He’s sovereign over what happens inside it.”
        Tom: That means He governs who can come in – such as ‘no shirt, no shoes, no service,’ he picks the method by which they can obtain the ice cream, such as it or offering a free sample they can try. He can even call the cops if they don’t pay.” It doesn’t mean he always picks the flavor they get.
        Albert: “But Bill wanted vanilla when he went in, only the shop owner gave him a sample of the chocolate to try and he ate that – then Bill bought the chocolate.”
        Tom: So the shop owner used his position to influence a decision. That didn’t determine Bill would pick chocolate, let alone show that Doug determines the choices of all who enter.
        Albert: “But Sally came in and Doug gave her a free chocolate!”
        Tom: Which would be him using his authority as shop-keeper to offer her a chocolate – she still could have refused it, or bought a vanilla the normal way. Besides, Sally is his niece. She’s the exception, not the rule.
        Albert: You’re just biased against my argument!

      118. Jenai,
        Enjoy your posts!

        If only they used Scripture and logic they would agree with you!

        Per this one and your earlier post ….

        Calvinists often say that God determines everything, and they use to prove it the phrases said about Jeremiah, David, and Joseph (Gen 50). I have posted here and elsewhere that this actually DISPROVES (not proves) their point. God is telling us WHEN He acts in a special way (that sometimes He acts in a special way).

        If He ALWAYS acted this way (micromanaging / determining every person) then He would not be saying anything special about David and Jeremiah. (Kinda like: “Yeah, you say you called Jeremiah in a special way God, but Calvinists tell us that you do that same for everybody, Attila the Hun included….. so nothing ‘special’ to see here.”)

      119. I misread this initially. To clarify, I believe that you meant if only Calvinists used logic and scripture they would agree with her’, not, if only her posts used logic and scripture’. Correct?

      120. Absolutely correct. You know me too well TruthSeeker!

        She does use both logic and Scripture.

      121. That’s an excellent point FOH!

        If the God of scripture takes the time to spell out things he is doing with a certain individual – then that is him expressing what he is doing with one specific individual out of many thousands of other people living at that time. If he were micro-managing every human being that lives he would express that instead of expressing what he is doing with one specific individual or one a group of people that belong to 12 tribes. And even then in most of those events mentioned in scripture – there are no indications that he is determining that person’s every neurological impulse to make them think and act the way he determines them to think and act. There fore those events do not represent examples of micromanaging human beings. And actually represent rare occasions.

      122. JR: For the non-Calvinist,…God’s plan is that any who respond to the gospel in faith/believe in Christ will be graciously pardoned, forgiven, baptized, adopted, reconciled, etc.”

        Your description does not distinguish the Calvinist from the non-Calvinist. The key phrase is, “…any who respond to the gospel in faith/believe in Christ…” We know that some do not hear the gospel, so they cannot respond in faith. We know tat, of those who he experience the gospel being preached, some respond in faith and some do not. The Calvinist would say that some were able to “hear” the gospel and others were not. How do we account for this? The Calvinist says that God gave faith to the ones who responded and did not give faith to the ones who did not respond. You can propose a non-Calvinist explanation for this outcome, if you want.

        then, “God specifically called Paul into ministry…”

        Agreed – nothing controversial here.

        Then, “God chose the faithful in Christ Jesus, before the foundation of the world, to be made Holy….Eph 1:1-14 does not state that God predestined anyone to be, or not to be, a believer or to be in Christ!”

        You lost me. Given that God did the choosing before the foundation of the world, how is that not God deciding to make certain people holy and not others? Could we not say, “God predestined the faithful in Christ Jesus, before the foundation of the world, to be made Holy.” In Romans 8, we see that those God predestined to be holy, He then called to Christ and then justified. Those not predestined to eb holy are the reprobate.

        Then, “God also seals those in Christ (the faithful in Christ Jesus whom Paul is addressing) with the Holy Spirit as a down payment of our future inheritance of eternal life.”

        Agreed, as Paul explains, “In Christ, you also, after listening to the message of truth, the gospel of your salvation–having also believed, you were sealed in Him with the Holy Spirit of promise,” Those God predestined to be holy before the foundation of the world then hear the gospel in the course of time and respond by believing and then are sealed by the Holy Spirit. Do we agree on that order?

        Then, ‘In the plan of salvation, God also predestined it to include the gentiles,…It is this aspect of predestination that Eph 1 deals with in-depth.”

        OK. I see Paul dealing with both Jews and gentiles by his descriptor, “Paul…to the saints who are at Ephesus, and who are faithful in Christ Jesus:” As Paul intended that this letter be read by the other churches given the nature of the teaching as applying to all believers. Thus, Ephesians can be understood to apply to both Jewish and gentile believers and both would take encouragement from the first chapter.

        Then, “Nothing in Rom 9 or 11 hints that God pre-picked who would be given faith in that promise while others were pre-doomed to never be able to believe the promise.”

        No hint?? Paul says that the children of promise are saved. Paul then writes, “For this is a word of promise:” and he now explains how the promise works. First, it was Sarah’s son who was the child of promise; not Ismail. Then, Jacob is the child of promise and not Esau. If Isaac and Jacob were not pre-picked then what were they? In Paul’s explanation, we are to understand that the Children of Promise are those chosen by God “in order that God’s purpose according to His choice might stand, not because of works, but because of Him who calls.”

        So, you write, “The Calvinist plan of individuals being pre-chosen by God, apart from faith but just by God’s choice, to definitely get faith and believe or definitely never be able to have faith?” Yes, as God’s choosing of Isaac over Ismail and Jacob over Esau demonstrates.

        Then, “The nation of Israel was elect due to God’s own choice…but they still rebelled,”

        This leads Paul to explain that God’s word had not failed as the children of promise were always in view to be saved.

        Then, “We all become part of the elect/the church through faith; and those with faith are made holy; a plan God predestined long before time, Israel, or the law. ”

        And it is God who gives faith to His elect because He has predestined them to holiness before the foundation of the world and then called to Christ in the course of time..

      123. JR: Albert: “The ice cream shop owner on the corner, Doug, determines the flavors of ice-cream everyone will purchase.”
        Tom: “Why do you think that?”
        Albert: “He only offers two flavors.”

        It should be
        “Albert: He only offers one flavor to some and the other flavor to the others.
        Tom: “That means each person’s choice is limited to the one flavor he is offered, and everyone has to pick what Albert chooses to give them.”

        The analogy is off if the intent was to portray Calvinism.

      124. JR: Albert: “The ice cream shop owner on the corner, Doug, determines the flavors of ice-cream everyone will purchase.”
        Tom: “Why do you think that?”
        Albert: “He only offers two flavors.”

        It should be
        “Albert: He only offers one flavor to some and the other flavor to the others.
        Tom: “That means each person’s choice is limited to the one flavor he is offered, and everyone has to pick what Albert chooses to give them.”

        The analogy is off if the intent was to portray Calvinism.

        br.d
        Actually JR’s two statements by “Albert” do represent Calvinism accurately.

        You’re replacement analogy also expresses truth concerning Calvinism -but expresses different points about it.

        But both are correct.

        As a mater of fact your analogy is quite LOGICALLY coherent with Adam in a Determinist world.
        In Theological Determinism (aka Calvinism) – as your analogy shows – it is case that only one choice was made available to Adam.
        The ice-cream flavor called “disobedience” was the only flavor made available to Adam.
        And as you say in your analogy – Adam had to pick what Calvin’s god choose to give him.

      125. “JR: Albert: “The ice cream shop owner on the corner, Doug, determines the flavors of ice-cream everyone will purchase.”
        Tom: “Why do you think that?”
        Albert: “He only offers two flavors.”

        It should be
        “Albert: He only offers one flavor to some and the other flavor to the others.
        Tom: “That means each person’s choice is limited to the one flavor he is offered, and everyone has to pick what Albert chooses to give them.”

        The analogy is off if the intent was to portray Calvinism.”

        ?? My analogy was meant to portray the illogic of the various *supports* you have been using to support Calvinism, claiming that they prove the initial premise. Even if you change the first line from “Doug determines the flavors of ice cream…” to “Doug must only offer one flavor to some and other flavors to others” that doesn’t change the analogy, which is not about Albert’s first premise but about how his “support claims” do not really prove it.

        I did not set up my analogy by saying,
        “I am going to make an analogy about Calvinism” but rather “Not being willing to take logical fallacies as sound reasoning or take out-of-context scripture as “proof” doesn’t mean I am letting bias color my conclusions.” The analogy is so you can better see why generalizing from the particular is a logical fallacy and why other ‘supports’ you have given do not support your conclusion at all.

        Now, I did pick the initial argument, that Albert thinks Doug must determines the flavors of ice-cream everyone will purchase, based on some of your own own prior words about God decreeing everything that occurs. We can use yours instead if you want (albeit modified since yours is asserting the conclusion as a proof, which is circular reasoning, AND makes the mistake of thinking that everyone must pick what is offered rather than leave, which is a fallacy all of it’s own…)

        Albert: “The ice cream shop owner on the corner, Doug, must only offer one flavor of ice cream to every person that comes in and disallows them to buy the others.
        Tom: “Why do you think that?”
        Albert: “He only offers two flavors in the shop in general.”
        Tom: “That means choices are limited, not that everyone has to pick what Albert chooses.”
        Albert: “But he owns the shop. He’s sovereign over what happens inside it.”
        Tom: That means He governs who can come in – such as ‘no shirt, no shoes, no service,’ he picks the method by which they can obtain the ice cream, such as it or offering a free sample they can try. He can even call the cops if they don’t pay.” It doesn’t mean he always picks the flavor they get.
        Albert: “But Bill wanted vanilla when he went in, only the shop owner gave him a sample of the chocolate to try and he ate that – then Bill bought the chocolate.”
        Tom: So the shop owner used his position to influence a decision. That didn’t determine Bill would pick chocolate, let alone show that Doug determines the choices of all who enter.
        Albert: “But Sally came in and Doug gave her a free chocolate!”
        Tom: Which would be him using his authority as shop-keeper to offer her a chocolate – she still could have refused it, or bought a vanilla the normal way. Besides, Sally is his niece. She’s the exception, not the rule.
        Albert: But when Janelle wanted chocolate, Albert wouldn’t give it to her.
        Tom: Because she has an outstanding tab. These are all particular instances – they don’t prove your premise that Albert only offers one flavor and disallows the other to everyone who enters.
        Albert: You’re just biased against my argument!

        Now, Albert *could* be right – maybe Doug really does just not let people purchase the flavor he doesn’t want to purchase. It’s unlikely for an ice cream shop owner, but theoretically possible. The point is that none of Albert’s arguments proved or even supported that Doug does such a thing all the time, as they used fallacious reasoning. Albert incorrectly extrapolated from the cases of individuals entering the shop (much as Calvinists often over-extrapolate from Paul or the other prophets where God is shown working in an unusual manner as somehow representing the norm.)

      126. Love it! And guess what, in the real ice cream shop called life, there are endless flavors from which to choose. Or we can choose to not have ice cream at all and go get an organic, grass-fed burger.

        Look around at the diversity in people and their lives. Compare that to the sort of world John Calvin sought to establish, in which people were meticulously controlled, even as to how they could wear their hair, what songs or games they could play, what they could serve for dinner or what they could name their children. That is what the Calvinist worldview produces – tyranny and control.

        Freedom and diversity is what a scriptural worldview produces. When I escaped my Calvi-church I found myself laughing for joy at girls with short skirts or people with extensive tattoos and purple hair. I had for so long been in a repressive, legalistic environment that I had become afraid to associate with real people. Some have deep needs. Like the girls holding hands and smooching, or the guy in a dress. And I don’t know that I have what it takes to meet those needs.

        All I can offer is the good news of a loving God who desires their best interests – without a doubt. There isn’t a chance in the world that their sin issues, or mine, are the result of God not loving us, or creating us for destruction. That is not, absolutely NOT, the good news Jesus sent his disciples to the world to deliver. Instead, as with the angels I can proclaim, ‘I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people . . . Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward men.’

        I’m so thankful that God gave us good news to share, rather than Calvin’s horrible decree.

      127. Wait a minute TS00…

        You dont think that is “Good News”—- that before time God created 98% of humanity with the sole intention of having them be vessels of wrath so that his justice could have an object?

        You dont think that is “Good News”—- that before time God chose a tiny few people to irresistibly save from sins they irresistibly had no choice in committing?

        You dont think that is “Good News”—- that before time God decided to “sovereignly will” that man would sin but “commandingly will” that they not sin?

        You dont think that is “Good News”—- that before time God decided to tuck all these tiny truths neatly in 40 verses so that the “doctors of the law” could find and construct them and teach the young and restless?

        You just dont know Good News when you see it!

      128. Au contraire, monsieur, ne dis pas de bêtises! I love how the french sounds so much nicer than ‘Don’t give me that nonsense’.

      129. JR: “The point is that none of Albert’s arguments proved or even supported that Doug does such a thing all the time, as they used fallacious reasoning.”

        OK. My problem is with your “fallacious reasoning” conclusion. I don’t see Calvinism appealing to fallacious reasoning. So, we need to change your staring comment by Albert to accord with Calvinism:

        Albert: “The ice cream shop owner on the corner, Doug, determines the flavors of ice-cream he will carry and make available to everyone to purchase.”

        Then:
        Tom: “Why do you think that?”
        Albert: “Because he owns the ice cream shop, so he does what he wants.”

        Under Calvinism, God makes salvation available to everyone and anyone can freely choose salvation or reject it. The problem is that no one really wants what God is offering – they would never choose that ice cream flavor and and always choose another ice cream flavor. So, maybe your analogy should start:

        Albert: “The ice cream shop owner on the corner, Doug, only carries one flavor of ice cream but makes it available to anyone to purchase.”

        I think your analogy misrepresents Calvinism in order to generate fallacious reasoning. The problem may lie with my ability to support Calvinism accurately. I have been reading the Institutes over the last week, so hopefully, my arguments will improve in accuracy. So, don’t fault Calvinism over my inability to communicate what it says.

      130. rh writes:
        “Under Calvinism, God makes salvation available to everyone and anyone can freely choose salvation or reject it. The problem is that no one really wants what God is offering . . .”

        I haven’t the slightest doubt JR can deal with this one more effectively than I . . . but isn’t this overlooking a tiny, little foundational Calvinist doctrine called limited atonement, which asserts that Jesus did not die for all, but only for the elect, who irrevocably must and will ‘choose’ the salvation ordained, decreed and, frankly, forced upon them? Did somebody just remove the ‘L’ out of TULIP?

      131. It also removes the I, as those who accept under Calvinism do not freely choose to accept, but are irresistibly made/transformed so they will definitely accept wit no chacne or ability to nkt accept. It’s like they want the surface language of freedom so it sounds nice, but what they end up with is anything but freedom.

        It’s like claiming Doug the Ice cream shop owner only offers one flavor, but he must put it in a special container that the majority of people who enter can’t see. And claiming even if Doug tells them how good it is, it doesn’t help because everyone is deaf. And claiming those who enter can’t even reach a hand out to feel for it, because they are all incapable like dead corpses. For that matter, they can’t even read the sign advertising ice cream or enter the shop. Then claiming that Doug arbitrarily chooses a select few that he zaps with life and energy and the ability to see the ice cream. But even then he leaves nothing to chance! He hypnotize those who can now see just to make sure they definitely eat the ice cream. And after claiming all those absurdities, making the further claim that everyone is “free” to take or leave the ice cream.

        And when people ask for proof, like Tom asked Albert, just assert presuppositions as true, appeal to fallacious reasoning like generalization from the particular, cls oit of context verdes ate support or just appeal to God’s theoretical ability to do whatever He pleases as proof that He pleases to do things in a specific way.
        (I say theoretical not because God is not omnipotent, buy because we know there are things God cannot do like violate His character, renege on a promise, create a logical impossibility like a square circle or married bachelor, etc.)

      132. JR writes:
        “And after claiming all those absurdities, making the further claim that everyone is “free” to take or leave the ice cream.”

        And, if all that is not bad enough, Doug the Ice Cream shop owner publicly condemns all who ‘refused’ to accept his offer of ice cream. After hiding the existence of the ice cream, and deafening all but a select few from hearing of it Doug the Ice Cream shop owner, who also just happens to be the King of the land, mercilessly slaughters all who arrogantly ‘refused’ to partake of the king’s most generous offer.

      133. FOH:
        “Okay…then RH is promoting TUP then, not TULIP.”
        Won’t work. If you have Total Depravity without Unconditional Election and Irrisistible Grace then all would die in sin. If you had Total Depravity and Unconditional Election without Limited Atonement, then all would be saved, as per Universalism. It is all or nothing; one cannot be a 2, 3, or 4-pointer, however many would like to believe they are. At most one could be a 1-pointer, believing in OSAS without the determinism, as most Baptists once did.

      134. Jenai
        It’s like they want the surface language of freedom so it sounds nice, but what they end up with is anything but freedom.

        br,d
        EXACTLY!

        Calvinism embraces the philosophy of Theological Determinism – and freedom is defined in compatibilistic terms.

        Immanuel Kant – “Critique of Practical Reason”
        quote:
        “Compatibilism is a wretched subterfuge with which some persons still let themselves be put off, and so think they have solved lives problems with petty word-jugglery.”

        Dr. William James- “The Dilemma of Determinism”
        quote:
        “Compatibilism is a quagmire of evasion. The Compatibilists strategy relies upon stealing the name of freedom to mask their underlying determinism. They make a pretense of restoring the caged bird to liberty with one hand, while with the other they anxiously tie a string to its leg to make sure it can’t get beyond determinism’s grasp.”

      135. JR: “It’s like claiming Doug the Ice cream shop owner only offers one flavor, but he must put it in a special container that the majority of people who enter can’t see.”

        The claim of Calvinism is that the gospel goes to the whole world, as Jesus said, ““Go into all the world and preach the gospel to all creation.” Because of Adam’ sin, people are unrighteous and have no faith (a point you have not disputed so far). So, what is the result, “John was not the light, but came that he might bear witness of the light. There was the true light which, coming into the world, enlightens every man…this is the judgment, that the light is come into the world, and men loved the darkness rather than the light; for their deeds were evil. For everyone who does evil hates the light, and does not come to the light, lest his deeds should be exposed.” This is the condition of humanity without faith. They have depraved hearts and like Israel, “we see that they were not able to enter because of unbelief.”

        So, the claim of Calvinism is that “the Ice cream shop owner (God) only offers one flavor,(salvation) and it is there for all to purchase (Come unto me, all ye that labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest} but without faith, all who enter refuse and reject it.” Having given people the opportunity to be saved and seeing that all reject salvation, God gets to choose whom He will save – “He chose us in Him before the foundation of the world,” and “All that the Father gives Me shall come to Me.” God’s choices of whom He will save is unconditional, not based on anything in the person but solely “after the counsel of His will.” This is unconditional election.

        So, for whom does Christ die? Does Christ die for those whom God has not given Him and who will not be saved? Paul said, “God demonstrates His own love toward us, in that while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us.” here, “us” refers to the believers to whom Paul writes. Then, “by the grace of God I am what I am, and His grace toward me did not prove vain;” and “I planted, Apollos watered, but God was causing the growth.” God is saving His elect and to accomplish this, God had to send Christ to die for them.

        How does God save His elect? “…unless one is born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God…he cannot enter into the kingdom of God.” So, “God who began a good work in you will perfect it until the day of Christ Jesus.” “by grace you have been saved through faith;…we are His workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them.”

        Then, JR: “And claiming even if Doug tells them how good it is, it doesn’t help because everyone is deaf.”

        Being unrighteous and without faith, everyone is deaf to the gospel, “we preach Christ crucified, to Jews a stumbling block, and to Gentiles foolishness.” ”

        Then, “And claiming those who enter can’t even reach a hand out to feel for it, because they are all incapable like dead corpses.”

        Yes. “you were dead in your trespasses and sins, in which you formerly walked according to the course of this world, according to the prince of the power of the air, of the spirit that is now working in the sons of disobedience. Among them we too all formerly lived in the lusts of our flesh, indulging the desires of the flesh and of the mind, and were by nature children of wrath, even as the rest.” and “…that you walk no longer just as the Gentiles also walk, in the futility of their mind, being darkened in their understanding, excluded from the life of God, because of the ignorance that is in them, because of the hardness of their heart; and they, having become callous, have given themselves over to sensuality, for the practice of every kind of impurity with greediness.”

        Then, “For that matter, they can’t even read the sign advertising ice cream or enter the shop.”

        No. If there is one thing the unsaved know – it is the gospel. That gospel is foolishness to them because they have no faith.

        Then, “Then claiming that Doug (God) arbitrarily chooses a select few that he zaps with life and energy and the ability to see the ice cream.’

        Not “arbitrarily” but “after the counsel of His will.” Theses God gives the new birth so that they can see the kingdom of God and then faith by which they enter the kingdom of God. If you want to say that God zaps them, that is fine. It gets the point across that it is God who saves.

        Then, “But even then he leaves nothing to chance! He hypnotize those who can now see just to make sure they definitely eat the ice cream. And after claiming all those absurdities, making the further claim that everyone is “free” to take or leave the ice cream.”

        What does Christ say, ““f you abide in My word, then you are truly disciples of Mine; and you shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free.” true freedom is only found in Christ. Those who have been freed from slavery to sin are truly free.

        Then, “when people ask for proof, like Tom asked Albert, just assert presuppositions as true, appeal to fallacious reasoning like generalization from the particular, cls oit of context verdes ate support or just appeal to God’s theoretical ability to do whatever He pleases as proof that He pleases to do things in a specific way.”

        Absolutely not. Calvinists appeal to the Scriptures in everything. The worse that you can say is that the Calvinists have misunderstood those Scriptures.

      136. Rhutchin,

        Your comments are a blessing, brother. I truly mean that (no sarcasm implied).

        Your comments should be a reminder to all of us that anyone can take verses, even half verses, out of context, ignoring grammar, to get them to say what we want them to say.

        Your comments should also remind us that we can truly believe something, I mean really, really believe something with all our heart and, yet, still be wrong.

        Still, even with your ongoing ramblings and your rejection of other alternative explanations, you have never been hateful or mean-spirited (At least, not that I have noticed). That is a credit to you. I can’t say that about some who have posted here in the past.

        I believe that most of what you embrace is flawed. Incredibly so. But everyone here embraces some form of error. I know most here reject some of my beliefs. That just means I am outnumbered, but that doesn’t mean I am wrong.

        Again, your comments are a blessing. Other than the occasional drive-by, you are our resident authority on Calvinism. Without your contributions some on-lookers might think we are making this stuff up. And without your comments, most likely we would just be arguing amongst ourselves. And that would be boring.

      137. phillip writes, “Your comments should be a reminder to all of us that anyone can take verses, even half verses, out of context, ignoring grammar, to get them to say what we want them to say.”

        How about explaining how you think verses were misunderstood or misused. One verse at a time, so we can get closure on issues.

      138. Well, brother, I am still waiting for a biblical response to 2 Timothy 2:10…

        “Therefore I endure all things for the sake of the elect, that they also may obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.”

        An answer that aligns with context, other scripture, and with a proper understanding of grammar. Up to this point, you have failed to do so.

      139. phillip writes, “Well, brother, I am still waiting for a biblical response to 2 Timothy 2:10…
        “Therefore I endure all things for the sake of the elect, that they also may obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.”

        I am encouraged that you did not challenge the arguments I made to Jenai’s Doug, the Ice Cream Shop owner.

        If memory serves me, you tend to live in an OT world so you see any mention of the “elect” in the NT as a reference to Israel, while I live in a OT/NT world and see the elect as Jews and gentiles. I thought that we had pretty much defined our positions on 2 Timothy 2 and there wasn’t more to say..

      140. No, brother. I live in both the OT and NT too. If I remember correctly, you have taken 3 or 5 cracks at it, while completely ignoring the grammar, which has nothing to do with scripture, but just an elementary education. I do, however, believe we have established that the Jews/Israelites do fit the immediate context.

        2 Timothy 2:10 (NKJV)
        Remember that Jesus Christ, of the seed of David (from the tribe of Judah, a descendant of Jacob/Israel), was raised from the dead according to my gospel, for which I suffer trouble as an evildoer, even to the point of chains (the Jews/Israelites are the ones who have imprisoned him; they are the reason he is in chains); but the word of God is not chained. Therefore I endure all things for the sake of the elect, that they also may obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.

        I am completely open to an alternative explanation. But it must align with all of scripture (both OT and NT) and fit the grammar. You cannot ignore the grammar. Or worse, just omit words (erase the words of God) like Piper does.

        Still waiting. Let’s have some closure.

      141. phillip writes, “I am completely open to an alternative explanation.”

        I have no problem with the comments you made in parenthesis – historical content is always good. The problem, if I remember correctly, was the identify of the “elect,” where you wanted this to be physical Israel (physical descendants of Israel) and everyone else recognizes Paul’s reference to be to be Jewish and gentile believers whether present or future.

      142. For any “new” on-lookers, here is a video (which I have posted before) of Calvinist John Piper discussing “the elect” from 2 Timothy 2:10.

        Please take special notice that Piper omits the word “also” each time he quotes the verse. Why? What’s the BIG deal? Because in doing so, it changes the meaning of Paul’s message. The word “also” introduces another category other than “the elect”, which, in this case, would have to be “the non-elect”.

        Below is just three examples in regards to the usage and meaning of “also”….

        Romans 3:29 (NKJV)….
        Or is He the God of the Jews (one category) only? Is He not also the God of the Gentiles (a completely different category)?

        Romans 4:9 (NKJV)….
        Does this blessedness then come upon the circumcised (one category) only, or upon the uncircumcised (another completely category) also?

        2 Timothy 2:11 (NKJV)….
        This is a faithful saying: For if we died (one event) with Him, We shall also live (a completely different event) with Him.

        With that in mind, we have….

        “Therefore I endure all things for the sake of the elect, that they (the elect; Jews/Israelites) also (with the non-elect; the Gentiles) may obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.”

        Piper omits the word “also” or “too” each time he quotes this verse. So this had to be by deliberate design. You would think that anyone in the audience with their Bibles open would have noticed this.

        Guess not.

      143. Hi Philip I don’t see the link in your post & I’m interested in listening and sharing the missing; “also” with others. If it’s in this thread I’ can search for it, but I just haven’t been able to read them all.

      144. Blessings, Reggie.

        Piper’s omittance of the word “also” is found in the video I posted above (were you unable to view it?). The video is rather short; just under 4 minutes. In it, Piper references 2 Timothy 2:10 three times. Two times he is reading directly from the text (1:18 and 2:47 marks of the video). Omitting a word once might have been just a mistake, but two times? Three? That’s deliberate. And shameful.

        Even more shameful if his audience failed to notice it.

        Please let me know if you are unable to view the video above.

      145. Hi Phillip I think I see what I must have done wrong which is to not click on continue reading🤔 or something….. but after searching through comments I did indeed find it.. Wow he does leave “also” from the ESV two times. Piper alo leaves out “Therefore” at the beginning, & “the” before salvation. My version the 1984 NIV has “too” in place of also, but you are correct he leaves it out both times… and states; (“I will be victorious with my word being spoken”) WHAT ding ding ding!! who in his close circle isn’t calling him out on such omissions and self centered statements??? Even if at first I didn’t catch the omission, but his statement would have started me question. Thanks for sharing🙋‍♀️

      146. Reggie,

        I remember the first time I watched this, I asked myself “Which translation is he using?” However, when I did the research, all the major and most used translations had either “also” or “too”. KJV, NKJV, NET, NIV, NASB, and even the beloved ESV. All of them. But Piper omits it. Why? Because that one simple word gets in the way of his system. Someone, other than “the elect” may obtain salvation too. And for Calvinism, that’s a “No No”.

        Blessings.

      147. Thanks for pointing that out Phillip.

        Of course in general Piper is revered by the Calvinist crowd and on this site considered nearly flawless by our Calvinists posters.

        (Calvinist) MacArthur takes him to the wood shed cuz he is Pentecostal.

        Oh well…. they can’t be right on everything! ((As long as they agree on determinism: that God is the creator of all evil. That’s all that really matters to them).

      148. You are more than welcome, dear brother.

        I understand that Piper might be a kind, gentle, and passionate believer, but when you start to omit the spoken word of God, something should “go off” in your head.

        When in church service, I always have my Bible open. I know not all translations are verbatim, but the meaning should never change. Again, two times Piper appears to be reading directly from the text. Most likely he is using the ESV, and yet…

        “Therefore I endure everything for the sake of the elect, that they ALSO may obtain the salvation that is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.”

        Also? “Well, we can’t have that, can we!?! Let me see….”

        “Therefore I endure everything for the sake of the elect, that they may obtain the salvation that is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.”

        “There” he says “Much better. And they will be none the wiser.” (insert eerie organ music)

      149. phillip writes, “With that in mind, we have….
        “Therefore I endure all things for the sake of the elect, that they (the elect; Jews/Israelites) also (with the non-elect; the Gentiles) may obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.”

        O, we can have

        “Therefore I endure all things for the sake of the elect, that the elect (especially, those I have yet to reach) also (with me) may obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.”

        Paul is explaining why he endures ordeals and sufferings, even as an evil doer. He is suffering at the hands of the Jews, Romans, idolaters, etc so that those to whom he preaches the gospel might also, together with him, obtain salvation.

        If we identify “elect” with the Jews as phillip suggests, we know from Romans 9, that it would apply not to the physical descendants of Abraham but only to the “children of promise.” However, Paul is not going to the Jews nor are they in view, as we see in his earlier instruction to Timothy, “the things which you have heard from me in the presence of many witnesses, these entrust to faithful men (primarily gentiles), who will be able to teach others also. Suffer hardship with me, as a good soldier of Christ Jesus… Remember Jesus Christ, risen from the dead…according to my gospel,” When Paul says “my gospel” he means that the gospel is for the gentiles as well as the Jews.

      150. Rhutchin writes….

        “Therefore I endure all things for the sake of the elect, that the elect (especially, those I have yet to reach) also (with me) may obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.”

        What did a say before? A blessing!

        Brothers/Sisters,

        I hope everyone is paying close attention here. This is a CLASSIC example of eisegesis. That is, reading into the text what you want it to say. You couldn’t have a better example, because not is he only ignoring the word of God, but he’s ignoring grammar as well. Rhutchin will not allow God, nor grammar, to get in the way of his system. He has to force into the text what he needs it to say to align with his beliefs.

        Any honest student of the word of God would find rhutchin’s explanation laughable. Just look to what extent he will go to to edit or add to the word of God.

        Shameful. This should be a lesson (and warning) to all of us.

        Look at Acts 28:20 (NKJV). This is the apostle Paul speaking, the same author of the books of Timothy…..

        “For this reason therefore I have called for you, to see you and speak with you, because for the hope of the elect I am bound with this chain.”

        Sounds simple enough, right? Only problem is, that is not exactly what the text says. In scripture Paul writes…..

        “For this reason therefore I have called for you, to see you and speak with you, because for the hope of Israel I am bound with this chain.”

        See how easily interchangeable “the elect” replaces “Israel”. And the meaning of the text doesn’t even change. Did Paul say it was “because for the hope of the body of Christ I am bound with this chain?” Nope. But that’s what some would have you to believe. Was it “because for the hope of the Gentiles I am bound with this chain?” Again, nope.

        Romans 9:3 (NKJV)…..
        For I could wish that I myself were accursed from Christ for my brethren, my countrymen according to the flesh….

        Did Paul say that he was willing to be accursed from Christ for the body of Christ? Or Gentile believers? Nope and nope. O, but that’s what they want it to say.

        Romans 11:13-14 (NKJV)…
        For I speak to you Gentiles; inasmuch as I am an apostle to the Gentiles, I magnify my ministry, if by any means I may provoke to jealousy those who are my flesh and save some of them.

        Was Paul magnifying his ministry to the Gentiles in the hope of saving some Gentiles? Nope.

        What did Paul say?

        Romans 10:1 (NKJV)….
        Brethren, my heart’s desire and prayer to God for Israel is that they may be saved.

        So what do we know? What do the scriptures tell us?

        1. It was Paul’s desire that Israel might be saved.

        2. Paul was willing to be accursed from Christ for his fellow Israelites.

        3. Paul magnified his ministry to Gentiles in the very hope of saving his fellow Israelites.

        4. It was for the hope of Israel that Paul wore his chains.

        What does that give us (if we allow God’s unfiltered word to speak)?

        2 Timothy 2:10 (NKJV)…
        Therefore I endure all things for the sake of the elect, that they (the elect) also (along with the non-elect) may obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.

        Paul was enduring his suffering on account of, and because of, the elect. The elect are the very ones who had him imprisoned. The elect are the ones who locked him up. And it was for these same elect that Paul was willing to suffer in the hopes of them obtaining salvation. Even though Paul’s ministry was to the Gentiles, Paul’s heart was always for the people of Israel.

        So simple. At least, for some.

      151. phillip writes, “Look at Acts 28:20 (NKJV). This is the apostle Paul speaking, the same author of the books of Timothy…..”

        Acts 28
        17 …it happened that after three days he called together those who were the leading men of the Jews, and when they had come together, he began saying to them, “Brethren, though I had done nothing against our people, or the customs of our fathers, yet I was delivered prisoner from Jerusalem into the hands of the Romans….
        20 “For this reason therefore, I requested to see you and to speak with you, for I am wearing this chain for the sake of the hope of Israel.”
        21 And they said to him, “We have neither received letters from Judea concerning you, nor have any of the brethren come here and reported or spoken anything bad about you.
        22 “But we desire to hear from you what your views are; for concerning this sect, it is known to us that it is spoken against everywhere.”

        In context, we understand “the hope of Israel” to be Christ and to the Jews, the Messiah – it was appropriate for Paul to make this connection in speaking to the Jews. However, Paul did not use the term, “elect.” Then, we read, “when they had set a day for him, they came to him at his lodging in large numbers; and he was explaining to them by solemnly testifying about the kingdom of God, and trying to persuade them concerning Jesus, from both the Law of Moses and from the Prophets, from morning until evening.” Paul does not reder to the Jews as “the elect” but he does preach Christ to them as he did to all people everywhere.

        Then, “Romans 9:3 (NKJV)…..
        For I could wish that I myself were accursed from Christ for my brethren, my countrymen according to the flesh….”

        No doubting Paul’s sincerity here for Israel. Then, we read, “…it is not that the word of God has taken no effect. For they are not all Israel who are of Israel, nor are they all children because they are the seed of Abraham; but, “In Isaac your seed shall be called. ” That is, those who are the children of the flesh, these are not the children of God; but the children of the promise are counted as the seed.” Here, Paul identifies the children of God as the children of promise and these would be the elect – not all of Israel.

        Then, “Paul was enduring his suffering on account of, and because of, the elect. The elect are the very ones who had him imprisoned.”

        If phillip is to be consistent in his reasoning, then he would identify the elect as the children of promise within Israel. Thus, we would have, ”

        “Therefore I endure all things for the sake of the [children of promise], that they [the children of promise] also [with the gentiles] may obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.”

        That would be a true statement, but I don’t see it fitting the immediate context of Paul’s instruction to Timothy.

      152. Rhutchin,

        Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

        However, you have (continually) failed to address the issue of the “also” or “too” in 2 Timothy 2:10 referring to a different category other than “the elect”. I have even provided biblical examples in an attempt to help you, but you insist “also” just means “the elect” by forcing in the concept of “over time”. This is just grammar. In the words of my Lord and Savior…

        “If I have told you earthly things (like grammar) and you do not believe, how will you believe if I tell you heavenly things (like scripture)?”

        I could take 2 Timothy 2:10 to an unbelieving English major and they would understand it. But show it to a Calvinist (and some others) and they struggle. Why?

        Again, quoting you…

        “Therefore I endure all things for the sake of the elect, that the elect (especially, those I have yet to reach) also (with me) may obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.”

        Seriously? Again, classic eisegesis. I find it extremely ironic that you reject most (if not all) alternate explanations here by our brothers and sisters in Christ regarding other portions of scripture, but then you dare put that out there as a plausible explanation. Its laughable. And if the shoe was on the other foot, you would be calling me out for doing the same. And justifiably so. Still, I admire your gumption for even attempting to address the issue. However, obviously, you are not going to allow grammar, nor God, to stand in the way of your precious Calvinism.

        Regarding 2 Timothy 2:10 we still don’t have closure, brother. But as long as you continue to ignore grammar, we never will.

      153. phillip writes, “However, you have (continually) failed to address the issue of the “also” or “too” in 2 Timothy 2:10 referring to a different category other than “the elect”.”

        “…the elect..” and “,..they…” are the same group. “…also…” points to something else or someone else (a different category to you), Paul wants the elect to obtain salvation also just like X category has.

        So, we get, “Therefore I endure all things for the sake of the elect, that they (those elect) also may obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory [even as X has].”

        You make it, “…also (along with the non-elect) may obtain the salvation…” However, the non-elect are not going to be saved – that is why they are non-elect.

        What grammar am I ignoring?

      154. Rhutchin writes….

        “You make it, ‘…also (along with the non-elect) may obtain the salvation…’ However, the non-elect are not going to be saved – that is why they are non-elect.”

        Thank you! And that is precisely what blinds you to the grammar!

        I’ll let brother Brian, who previously explained it to you, yet again. He’s words, not mine…..

        “2 Tim 2:10 – διὰ τοῦτο πάντα ὑπομένω διὰ τοὺς ἐκλεκτούς ἵνα καὶ αὐτοὶ σωτηρίας τύχωσιν τῆς ἐν Χριστῷ Ἰησοῦ μετὰ δόξης αἰωνίου

        My literal translation – ‘on account of this, these [things] I am enduring on account of the elect [ones] in order that even to/for/with/by them salvation/deliverance they should obtain/experience, the [kind that is] in Jesus, with everlasting glory.’

        The και – meaning ‘even’, has to do with Paul’s introducing ANOTHER CATEGORY of people, besides the Gentiles to whom he is an apostle, and whom he is wanting to see saved. This other category he also wants to see saved and is willing to keep enduring all things so that might happen.

        That other category is ‘elect ones’, and so Phillip has context and other passages on his side pointing to ‘elect ones’ here meaning Jews who are not yet saved, but on account of whom (their forcing Paul’s arrest and trial by Rome) he is enduring his current imprisonment.”

        Brother Brian nailed it. I’m trying to help you understand this, brother, but your theology has blinded you to it. Paul can’t be saying what he is saying because you are convinced the non-elect can’t be saved.

        And, yet, here I am! Praise God!!

      155. Phillip,
        And what’s more in that verse…. Why does Paul have to “endure” anything so that others would receive salvation?

        I mean, that puts some of their salvation on his endurance right? Talk about synergism!!

        There is no monergism in that verse! Paul is the first and best Arminian (or non-Calvinist if that term bothers you).

        Paul persuades, reasons with, and convinces people, and is “all things to all men that he might win some…”

        Monergism.com should take all references to Paul off their site (they have can have Luther and Calvin and Mary-worshiping Augustine if they want)

      156. FOH,

        Agreed. In Calvin-land the salvation of the elect is a certainty. Paul could have gone along his merry way and it would have changed nothing.

        But Paul loved his fellow Israelites so much he was willing to be imprisoned by them, and for them.

        “Therefore I endure all things for the sake of my fellow Israelites (the elect), that they also (along with the non-elect; the Gentiles) may obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.”

        Though it aligns itself perfectly with scripture and grammar, rhutchin can’t allow it.

        You know me, brother. “Arminian” does rub me a bit. I see them as 2 point Calvinists (both adhere to TD/TI and some form of Irresistible Grace). Arminianism is just a softer, user-friendly, version of Calvinism. But, another subject.

        Still, bless his heart, rhutchin struggles with both grammar and scripture. “Well, it can’t mean that, because my system won’t allow it.”

        Well, maybe you need to re-evaluate your system. I mean, just where does your loyalty lie? With God? Or with your beliefs?

        God bless you, brother.

      157. phillip uses Brians analysis, “My literal translation – ‘on account of this, these [things] I am enduring on account of the elect [ones] in order that even to/for/with/by them salvation/deliverance they should obtain/experience, the [kind that is] in Jesus, with everlasting glory.’

        Brian has “elect ones” and “them/they” being two categories of people. As Brian says, “‘even’, has to do with Paul’s introducing ANOTHER CATEGORY of people, besides the Gentiles to whom he is an apostle,” Thus, Brian reads the verse:

        ‘I endure all things for the sake of the [gentiles], that [the Jews] also may obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.”

        But then, Brian writes, “That other category is ‘elect ones’, and so Phillip has context and other passages on his side pointing to ‘elect ones’ here meaning Jews who are not yet saved,..” So, this gives us:

        “I endure all things for the sake of the [unsaved Jews], that [the gentiles] also may obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.”

        Then, Brian says, “This other category he also wants to see saved and is willing to keep enduring all things so that might happen.” This would give us the reading:

        “I endure all things on account of the [unsaved Jews], for the sake of [the gentiles] that they may also obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.”

        I think this is a good translation as it seems to fit the context.

        You, however, have it:

        ‘I endure all things for the sake of the [Jews], that [the gentiles] also may obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.”

        Here, your positioning of “for the sake of” seems to be off. If you translate, “even/also” to suggest, “fort the sake of” giving us Brian’s apparent translation – “I endure all things on account of the [unsaved Jews], for the sake of [the gentiles] that they may also obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.” – I think we have something on which we can agree.

        Maybe, Brian can chime in and gives us his rendition of the verse.

      158. Rhutchin writes…

        “You, however, have it: ‘I endure all things for the sake of the [Jews], that [the gentiles] also may obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.’”

        Not exactly. You need to go back and re-read my comments and Brian’s as well.

        2 Timothy 2:10 (NKJV)….
        Therefore I endure all things for the sake of the elect (his fellow Israelites), that they (the elect; his fellow Israelites) also (along with the non-elect; the Gentiles to which he is an apostle) may obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.

        “The elect” is a direct reference to the people of Israel. The “also” or “too” introduces another category of people, who are distinguishable from “the elect”. Given there can only be two groups, that other category would have to be the non-elect, in this case, the Gentiles (or non-Israelites).

        Salvation may be obtained by both Israelites (the elect) and Gentiles (the non-elect). Now here comes the part that is only going to make matters worse for you. Salvation is obtainable by both “the elect” (or Israelites) and the “non-elect” (or non-Israelites), because Christ died for all. Both Jew and Gentile. Both elect and non-elect.

      159. phillip writes, ‘Salvation may be obtained by both Israelites (the elect) and Gentiles (the non-elect). Now here comes the part that is only going to make matters worse for you.”

        I still like this translation:

        “I endure all things on account of the [unsaved Jews/his fellow Israelites], for the sake of [the gentiles] that they may also obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.”

        I think you are asking too much of “τηα καὶ αὐτοὶ” in your translation. But, maybe Brian can set it right.

      160. Rhutchin writes…. “I still like this translation:

        ‘I endure all things on account of the [unsaved Jews/his fellow Israelites], for the sake of [the gentiles] that they may also obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.’”

        Your “translation” is a mess. You really need to work on your grammar, brother.

        Rhutchin writes… “But, maybe Brian can set it right.”

        He already did when he wrote… “…so Phillip has context and other passages on his side pointing to ‘elect ones’ here meaning Jews who are not yet saved, but on account of whom (their forcing Paul’s arrest and trial by Rome) he is enduring his current imprisonment.”

        He confirmed I had/have both context and grammar correct, with additional scripture support. Everything you would expect from a sound exegetical analysis.

      161. phillip writes, “He already did when he wrote… “…so Phillip has context and other passages on his side pointing to ‘elect ones’ here meaning Jews who are not yet saved, but on account of whom (their forcing Paul’s arrest and trial by Rome) he is enduring his current imprisonment.””

        We can both agree to that. That gives us the translation of the first part of the verse as, “Therefore I endure all things on account of whom (the unsaved Jews forcing Paul’s arrest and trial by Rome) he is enduring his current imprisonment….”

        I don’t think that is at issue, Is it?

        Then, given that “also” denotes a different category – gentiles – we get the last part of the verse, “…that [the gentiles] also may obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.”

        As we seem to be agreeing with Brain on this translation, what is your issue??

        Brian’s translation seems fine to me as it fits the immediate context.

      162. Rhutchin asks… “I don’t think that is at issue, Is it?”

        It has been “one” issue up to now, that is, if you are now willing to concede that the elect are the ones imprisoning him. The elect are the ones locking him up in the hopes of having him killed. The elect are the ones who want him dead.

        Rhutchin then asks… “As we seem to be agreeing with Brain on this translation, what is your issue??”

        The issue is (unless I am mistaken) you fail to see that the Gentiles are not among “the elect”. No doubt, in your mind, this verse means…

        “Therefore I endure all things for the sake of the elect Jews, that they (the elect Jews) also (with the elect Gentiles) may obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.”

        But that is NOT a valid translation. Whoever the “also” Paul is referring to, they are NOT part of “the elect”. For me, call me crazy, but that would only leave “the non-elect” (remember: another category). And according to Paul, they, the non-elect, can also obtain salvation.

        Also, as Brother Brian just reminded me, the salvation of “the elect” in this verse is no guarantee. Paul feels a high probably that the elect won’t obtain salvation, but he is willing to endure his suffering, at their very hands, in the hopes that they might. Again, this is supported by Romans 11:14 (NKJV)….

        “…if by any means I may provoke to jealousy those who are my flesh (his fellow Israelites) and save some of them.”

        I’m truly trying to help you, brother. But if you want this verse to make any sense at all, you are going to have to jettison Calvinism (though painful as it may be). Or, you can just omit “also” like Piper did. That might be easier. It was for him.

      163. phillip writes, “if you are now willing to concede that the elect are the ones imprisoning him.”

        If by elect, you mean physical Israel. then reading it as “Therefore I endure all things on account of the Jews…”

        Then, “The issue is (unless I am mistaken) you fail to see that the Gentiles are not among “the elect”. No doubt, in your mind, this verse means…”

        I haven’t seen anything preventing that reading. We can read this as, “”Therefore I endure all things on account of God’s elect…”

      164. Rhutchin writes….“I haven’t seen anything preventing that reading.”

        Of course you haven’t, brother.

        Let’s try the ESV (okay?), that’s the Calvinist’s translation of choice.

        2 Timothy 2:10 (ESV)….
        Therefore I endure everything for the sake of the elect, that they ALSO may obtain the salvation that is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.

        1. “The elect” are the physical descendants of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. Paul’s fellow countrymen according to the flesh.

        2. Paul is enduring his suffering because of, and at the hands of, “the elect” or “God’s chosen ones”. It is “the elect” or “God’s chosen ones” who have imprisoned him and want him put to death.

        3. Paul is willing to endure this suffering by the hands of “the elect” or “God’s chosen ones” so that they also may obtain the salvation in Christ Jesus. There is a high probability they won’t, which is what causes Paul so much anguish (Romans 9:1-3). The salvation of “the elect” or “God’s chosen ones” is not a guarantee. Some of, or worse, perhaps most, of “the elect” will be lost. And Paul knows it!

        4. The “also” or “too” suggests there is another category of people who are not part of “the elect” or “God’s chosen ones”. This would have to be the Gentiles (the non-elect/non-Israelites) to whom he was sent. These, too, may (or may not) obtain the salvation that is in Christ Jesus.

        I have explained this to the point that even a child could understand it. Brother Brian has been gracious enough to chime in and say pretty much the same thing, though in less words. I’m pretty sure most on-lookers “get it”, though most have probably never thought of it in this way.

        You’re naturally resistant to it, because it refutes so much of what you believe. In the words of Yoda…. “You must unlearn what you have learned”.

        I have personally “Been there. Done that.” And I know its not easy, brother.

      165. The author of “Examining Calvinism” writes this about 2nd Timothy 2:10

        You can see how John Calvin infers that “the church” is the intended reference,[to Paul’s use of the term elect] and by that reference, the Calvinistically elect church. However, the problem is that this would have Paul contrasting one group with the same group, which wouldn’t make sense.

        Question:
        Can the Calvinist interpretation adequately explain the phrase, “they also”?

        Answer:
        Obviously I don’t think that it can. Otherwise, it would be like saying, “For this reason I endure all things for the sake of the Calvinistically elect, so that they too may obtain the salvation which the Calvinistically elect receive.”

        In other words, it makes no sense to contrast one group with the same group. The phrase, “they also,” can only make sense if it is contrasting differing groups.

        Laurence Vance writes: “To believe that Paul strove (Rom. 15:20) and labored in the Gospel (Phil. 4:3), enduring (2 Tim. 2:10) beatings, stoning, imprisonments, shipwreck, perils, pain, hunger and cold (2 Cor. 11:23-27) for the sake of the ‘elect’ who would be saved anyway is the most preposterous excuse ever offered in support of Unconditional Election.” (The Other Side of Calvinism, p.369)

        Additionally – if Paul endured all of these things for those who would be saved anyway, due to an irresistible, unavoidable, impossible-to-miss grace, simply because Paul might possibly have assumed it as “the predestined means,” [also] infers quite a bit upon Paul.

        To suppose that sufferings would be “the predestined means,” just doesn’t seem to be an adequate motivation.

        A more logical, sensible and plausible motivation is the idea that effort is something that aims towards that which *CAN* be, rather than something that WILL REGARDLESS INEVITABLY be.

        I believe that this references to the Jews. Why would Paul add the description of Jesus being a “descendant of David”? David was a Jew. Who caused Paul such “hardship”? It was the Jews. Who chased him down from city to city, and had him stoned and placed in prison and treated as a “criminal”?

        It was the Jews.

      166. BrD,

        Thank you, brother, for sharing this.

        Calvin isn’t the only one who reads “the church” into 2 Timothy 2:10, most non-Calvinists do too.

        In the video with Piper, he states, regarding the elect, that “Paul doesn’t have a clue who they are”. Wrong. Paul knows exactly who the elect are. That entire 4 minute video is based on a false premise. Its garbage and should be treated as such.

        Now from your post….

        “In other words, it makes no sense to contrast one group with the same group. The phrase, ‘they also’, can only make sense if it is contrasting differing groups.”

        Gee. Sounds familiar.

        Then….

        “I believe that this references to the Jews. Why would Paul add the description of Jesus being a ‘descendant of David’? David was a Jew. Who caused Paul such ‘hardship’? It was the Jews. Who chased him down from city to city, and had him stoned and placed in prison and treated as a ‘criminal’? It was the Jews.”

        Makes sense to me. Of course there is other scriptural support as well.

        Acts 28:20 (NKJV)….
        For this reason therefore I have called for you, to see you and speak with you, because for the hope of Israel I am bound with this chain.”

        Context. Grammar. Other scriptural support. Everything you would expect from a sound exegetical analysis.

        And, yet, most still want to pull a Piper…

        “Therefore I endure all things for the sake of the elect, that they **poof** may obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.”

      167. I agree – I think Piper is just doing what all Calvinists are taught to do – makes all kinds of blind speculations – in order to maintain the sacred science – and make it APPEAR to align with scripture. And it always leads them into a ditch of self-contradictions and IRRATIONAL assertions.

      168. BrD,

        Just curious, brother, and I don’t mean to put you in the line of fire. With everything you have read, do you think I am way off base?

      169. I think that makes the most sense of that passage. Although Paul in other places calls Jews with different references. “my brethren after the flesh”, or “the circumcision” etc.

      170. Thanks, brother. I agree.

        Clearly, Jesus is speaking about the Jews when He uses the phrase “the elect” in Matthew 24.

        So, if “the elect” refers to the Jews in 2 Timothy 2:10, then the other group (not an individual; we are contrasting different groups) other than “they also” would point to the “non-elect”, or the non-Jew, in this context, the Gentiles.

        This is a hard teaching for some because they are convinced that every time they see the phrase “the elect” they are sure it refers to believers, or those who are saved. Here, in 2 Timothy 2:10 we see Paul calling a group of people “the elect” and, yet, in Paul’s mind (and language) they are still lost.

      171. I think we will find messianic and rabbinical scholars who would agree with this interpretation.

        I note that Paul uses the same root-word (ἐκλεκτ) ῶν in 1 Timothy 5:21 – where he refers to “elect” angels.

        I believe the word בְחִיר֗וֹ in Ps.106:23 – in regard to Moses – is translated as “Yahweh’s Chosen One” or “elected” one.

        And it seems like Paul’s choice of words when he references Israel – he tends to use specific adjectives to describe them in the context of his different thoughts concerning them. There is a historic sense in which Israel was God’s chosen people – set apart from the rest of the nations to be a nation of kings and priests (exodus 19:6) – and that could be conceived as a form of “election”.

        King Saul was chosen for a specific purpose as was David. So there is a form of “chosen” status that is consistent in God’s dealing with Israel. And since Paul is willing to call Angels “elect” – which would probably be a reference to their status of being chosen for specific purposes – then its quite reasonable to allow for Paul to use the same root word in regard to the Jewish people.

        This would be an excellent question to ask Dr. Michael Brown

      172. BrD,

        I found the below on that website you pointed out (Examining Calvinism). Again, thanks for sharing!

        “The phrase ‘they also’ ruins this interpretation. If you take out ‘they also’, the Calvinist interpretation becomes more plausible, but who would want to subtract from Scripture? The text would look like this: ‘For this reason I endure all things for the sake of those who are chosen, so that they…may obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus and with it eternal glory.’ That would eliminate the contrast, and would make the calvinistically elect into the sole object.”

        But who would want to subtract from Scripture? John Piper!

        Then, same website…

        Question: Who are the “chosen” and what is the implication of “they also”?

        Answer: I believe that this references to the Jews. Why would Paul add the description of Jesus being a “descendant of David”? David was a Jew. Who caused Paul such “hardship”? It was the Jews. Who chased him down from city to city, and had him stoned and placed in prison and treated as a “criminal”? It was the Jews. Yet, despite being an apostle to the Gentiles, Paul had a zealous passion for reaching the Jews. (Romans 9:1-5, 10:1-3, 11:12-14) That explains the expression, “they also.” It must be pointed out that Paul sometimes references the Jews by other expressions. Galatians 2: 7-9 states: “But on the contrary, seeing that I had been entrusted with the gospel to the uncircumcised, just as Peter had been to the circumcised (for He who effectually worked for Peter in his apostleship to the circumcised effectually worked for me also to the Gentiles), and recognizing the grace that had been given to me, James and Cephas and John, who were reputed to be pillars, gave to me and Barnabas the right hand of fellowship, so that we might go to the Gentiles and they to the circumcised.” Another example is Romans 15:8: “For I say that Christ has become a servant to the circumcision on behalf of the truth of God to confirm the promises given to the fathers, and for the Gentiles to glorify God for His mercy.” It’s clear that Paul is making an indirect reference to the Jews. That seems to be the case at 2nd Timothy 2:10 as well, given all of the aforementioned factors. Moreover, I believe that the Jews are specifically called “elect” by Jesus, insomuch that the Jews have an election in Abraham. At Matthew 24:22-31, Jesus specifically discusses what I believe must exclusively be the Jews.
        ………………..

        Agreed. If you believe “the church” is the elect then you have the body of Christ going thru the tribulation period. There are those, like myself, who believe the church will be in heaven during the tribulation period. If so, then who are “the elect” in Matthew 24:22-31? The language points to the Jews.

      173. Piper is a typical Calvinist in how he AUTO-MAGICALLY superimposes the irrational world of Calvinism into everything.
        I think Mr. Piper is probably one of the most popular voices of Calvinist double-speak in their guild.

      174. phillip writes, “2. Paul is enduring his suffering because of, and at the hands of, “the elect” or “God’s chosen ones”. It is “the elect” or “God’s chosen ones” who have imprisoned him and want him put to death.”

        Paul is being harassed by the Jewish leaders and he endures this on account of the elect, So the ESV, “Therefore I endure everything [done to me by the Jews] for the sake of the elect [of God]…,” I think you have a point in the treatment of “dia” by the translators. It seems that the verse could be translated as “Therefore I endure everything on account of the elect [physical] Israel,…” It doesn’t make sense to me, because earlier Paul says he is suffering because of the gospel making those whom God is saving his concern.

        Then, “3. Paul is willing to endure this suffering by the hands of “the elect” or “God’s chosen ones” so that they also may obtain the salvation in Christ Jesus.”

        So, Paul endures suffering at the hands of the Jews so that the remnant can be saved. That’s fine.

        Then, “4. The “also” or “too” suggests there is another category of people who are not part of “the elect” or “God’s chosen ones”.

        “also” identifies with “they” and the antecedent of “they” is the previous “elect.” If you make the elect to be the physical nation of Israel, you cannot add the gentiles into “they.” The grammar does not allow it. You have Paul writing that he endures suffering at the hands of the Jews in order that the remnant would be saved – the remnany uniquely identifies with the “children of promise” in Romans 9, and does not include gentiles.

        Then, “I have explained this to the point that even a child could understand it. ”

        While taking a few liberties with the text (principally your treatment of “they” and its antecedent). However, you still need to explain why Paul would be talking about physical Israel in the context of his instructions to Timothy. You have done half the job – the half that allows your personal views of v10.

      175. Rhutchin writes….

        “the ‘also’ identifies with ‘they’ and the antecedent of ‘they’ is the previous “elect.” If you make the elect to be the physical nation of Israel, you cannot add the gentiles into ‘they’. The grammar does not allow it.”

        You’re a mess, brother.

        “They” is a reference back to “the elect”, which is the people of Israel. The “also” is added to show someone other than “they” or “the elect” can obtain salvation. In context, that would have to be the “non-elect”, in this case the non-Israelites, or Gentiles. Thus…

        Therefore I endure everything for the sake of the elect, that the elect also (along with the non-elect) may obtain the salvation that is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.

        Or….

        Therefore I endure everything for the sake of the Jews, that the Jews also (along with the Gentiles) may obtain the salvation that is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.

        The “also” changes everything, which is why Piper omits it (to his shame). This is how he reads it….

        “Therefore I endure everything for the sake of the elect, that they (the elect) may obtain the salvation that is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.”

        That’s what you want it to say. But Paul (by inspiration) added “also” for a reason. Even though Paul is the apostle to the Gentiles, Paul is willing to suffer for the sake of the Jews (the elect), and by their hand, in hopes that they (the elect) will obtain salvation as well, along with the Gentiles.

        Why do I get the impression that everyone else “gets it”, but you don’t.

      176. phillip writes, ““They” is a reference back to “the elect”, which is the people of Israel. The “also” is added to show someone other than “they” or “the elect” can obtain salvation. In context, that would have to be the “non-elect”, in this case the non-Israelites, or Gentiles. Thus…

        Therefore I endure everything for the sake of the elect, that the elect also (along with the non-elect) may obtain the salvation that is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.”

        That’s a little hard to take.”…also..” modifies “…they…” – “…that the elect also…” Inserting “(along with the non-elect)” is not called for by any stretch of the imagination. That’s you trying to make the verse say something it does not.

        At least, we seem to have identified our positions. I don’t see anything else to be gained.

      177. Rhutchin writes… “That’s a little hard to take.’…also..’ modifies ‘…they…’ – ‘…that the elect also…’ Inserting ‘(along with the non-elect)’ is not called for by any stretch of the imagination. That’s you trying to make the verse say something it does not.”

        Not at all. Since the text clearly points “they” to “the elect” and since “also” implies another category in direct contrast to “the elect”, the only viable option would have to be the non-elect. Very simple to those who are willing to grasp it.

        Maybe this will help you…

        “Therefore I endure all this for the sake of rhutchin, that he also may obtain a better understanding of this scripture.”

        You said “At least, we seem to have identified our positions. I don’t see anything else to be gained.”

        Perhaps. However, “my” position fits both the context and the grammar, plus with additional scriptural support. Even Brian acknowledges this. “Your” position fails on every front.

      178. phillip writes, “Maybe this will help you…
        “Therefore I endure all this for the sake of rhutchin, that he also may obtain a better understanding of this scripture.”

        To what would “also” refer in the above? Me?

      179. No, brother. “Also” would refer to those not named “rhutchin”, but who might be reading along.

        Thanks for asking.

      180. Rhutchin.

        My bad. I did that rather quickly.

        The “also” applies to you. However, the “also” suggests someone other than “rhutchin” might obtain a better understanding of this scripture as well.

        You’re the reason I am enduring all of this, and its for your benefit, but other “on-lookers” can benefit from it as well.

      181. Phillip writes:
        ““Therefore I endure everything for the sake of the elect, that they (the elect) may obtain the salvation that is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.”

        That’s what you want it to say. But Paul (by inspiration) added “also” for a reason. Even though Paul is the apostle to the Gentiles, Paul is willing to suffer for the sake of the Jews (the elect), and by their hand, in hopes that they (the elect) will obtain salvation as well, along with the Gentiles.

        Why do I get the impression that everyone else “gets it”, but you don’t.”

        Add me to the ‘don’t get it’ list. 😉

        I do not see how you justify ignoring the plain, most natural reading of the verse. It is no different from someone saying, ‘Therefore I paid the big bucks for the kids’ tickets, so that they also may go to the playoff game.’ One could mean the exact same thing with or without the explicit use of the word ‘also’, but the implication of the ‘also’ is that the speaker, and potentially unnamed others were already going to the game, and it was decided that it was worth the extra money so that the kids could also go to the game. You are simply reading anything else into the passage due to presupposition. I find this to be the case whenever one attempts to assert that ‘the elect’ must mean ‘the Jews’, when in every case it could just as easily, or more easily, refer to ‘all who will ever believe’.

        Note, I am not saying you MUST be wrong, but you easily might be, as is so often true of interpretations made by adding or insisting on a meaning that is not made clear in the passage.

        Perhaps you might rest your case on this issue, as your opinion has been made clear, but is not by any means universally held. I do not begrudge you the right to your own personal opinions, but simply challenge the repeated claims that ‘all get it’, when, frankly, ‘all’ don’t necessarily believe what you believe. No offense intended.

      182. TS00,

        Perhaps I should clarify what I meant by “why do I get the impression that everyone else ‘gets it’, but you don’t.”

        I never said that everyone “agrees” with me (I know better), but rather everyone else might “get” what I am attempting to explain. My explanation to rhutchin appears to come across as not being understandable (he’s baffled by the explanation). Where I believe everyone else clearly understands what I am saying, regardless if they accept it or not.

        For example, I believe you “get” what I am saying, but you just don’t agree with me. I’m fine with that.

      183. Thanks for that explanation. And for not taking offense. 😉 Yes, I’m afraid it appears at times that good ol’ rhutchin pretends to not ‘get’ what one is saying, for reasons of his own. But we love him anyway. You are correct that I understand your view, and even grant that it might be possible, but do not find it to be the most logical or scripturally consistent interpretation.

      184. No worries, brother. I’m thicker skinned than that.

        If I was failing to get my point across (even with rhutchin), then that’s on me. Once everyone understands what I am saying, I’m clean. I am starting to think Rhutchin just wants me to live in the tub 😉

      185. I learned a long time ago that RH is not here to be open-minded or truth-seeking. I pay close attention to behavior patterns. Calvinist language is not a truth-telling language – its a cosmetic language designed to air-brush an acceptable image of Calvinism. So it makes sense that a Calvinist would dedicate himself to that cause.

      186. Just briefly,

        Salvation is an “already and not yet” concept in scripture. We have salvation from the first moment of faith when we die to sin and God raises us to new life; we hold salvation as we continue to believe; we get salvation in future at the judgement when we are given new spiritual bodies.

        “Therefore I endure everything for the sake of the elect, that they too may hit upon the salvation that is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.” II Tim 2:10 (There is no ‘and with it’ – just with.

        ‘Obtain’ here is simply ‘hit the mark,’ the antonym/opposite of hemartia (sin/to miss the mark.) So it is quite possible (especially in light of the phrase “eternal life” and the next few verses which mention reigning with Christ in conjunction with enduring that Paul is speaking of our future eternal life. Encouragement of the saints would seem to fit the context well.

        There are some potential parallel scriptures:

        “If we are distressed, it is for your comfort and salvation; if we are comforted, it is for your comfort, which produces in you patient endurance of the same sufferings we suffer.” II Cor 1:6

        The Corinthian church are already believers. So ‘salvation’ here would be in either/both the present and future sense a believer has salvation.

        “For our light and momentary troubles are achieving for us an eternal glory that far outweighs them all.” II Cor 4:17

        I think there are some others as well.

        Tit 1:1-2 also shows the elect waiting for eternal life – back to that ‘already and not yet’ factor.

        “Paul, a servant of God and an apostle of Jesus Christ to further the faith of God’s elect and their knowledge of the truth that leads to godliness— in the hope of eternal life, which God, who does not lie, promised before the beginning of time, and which now at his appointed season he has brought to light through the preaching entrusted to me by the command of God our Savior…”

        So just a possibility here, but Paul could easily be talking of the the faithful in Christ Jesus who are chosen to be made holy and who are waiting for new spiritual bodies at the judgement (eternal life) vs. talking about people who have yet to put faith in Christ.

      187. I think it is clear from the text that Paul is worried about “the elect’s” salvation, and not just some other future spiritual blessing. Those other spiritual blessings will happen to those who are in Christ Jesus, so the “may” is not an option.

        Though another author, we read…

        1 John 5:13 (NKJV)…
        These things I have written to you who believe in the name of the Son of God, that you may know that you have (present tense) eternal life, and that you may continue to believe in the name of the Son of God.

        While it is true that believers await their future glorification, I think its clear in 2 Timothy 2:10 that Paul’s concern is for the salvation of the elect, and not just some additional spiritual benefit for them. The “also” in 2 Timothy 2:10 suggests another category of people in direct contrast to “the elect”, rather than “also” referring to another spiritual benefit for “the elect” other than salvation itself.

        Something to think about.

      188. Concern about future salvation is still concern about salvation, not merely lesser spiritual blessings. Salvation, for the believer, is past, present, and future. The final blessings of salvation, such as being resurrected in a new spiritual body, are not granted until judgement day, even though the believer has present assurance that those promises will be fulfilled. Right now we have the promise of eternal glory, not the actuality, even though scripture in both Hebrew and Greek often idiomatically treats the promises of God as present realities. None of us are sinless, or walking around with resurrected bodies, or literally dwelling in the New Jerusalem, or have attended the wedding feast of the lamb, etc. We “have” those things now because they are promised to believers, but we will see them fulfilled in the future.

        In II Cor 1 we see Paul being afflicted “for the comfort and salvation” of the Corinthian church, who are already believers. In Eph 1 we see Paul in prison for the sake of the Gentiles of the Ephesian church, also presumably believers. In II Cor 4:17 we see again Paul’s suffering working out an “eternal weight of glory” in Paul and other Christians who suffer, even though he is already saved.

        This fits with the context, considering Paul’s very next line that “if we died (aorist) with him, we will also live with him (future active indicative.)” And “if we endure, we will reign with him” contrasted with the opposite response to affliction, “denying/disowning” Christ. This strongly implies, if not mandates, that the elect under discussion are believers, and he is hoping that his example will help them stand fast in times of affliction so they will continue to the end and be saved. It also fits with Paul’s earlier analogy that “If anyone competes as an athlete, he does not win the prize unless he competes according to the rules.”

        See also I Pet 1:1-9, where Peter addresses the exiles as part of God’s elect, and also speaks of their inheritance kept in heaven for them until the “coming of salvation which is ready to be revealed in the last time” and explains that their suffering and trials are there to test/prove the genuineness of their faith, and the end result of faith is the salvation of their souls. Different author, but same concept.

        Even further support for this is found back in the context, in II Tim 2:18, where Paul talks about false teachers who have departed from the truth. The specific teaching, destroying the faith of some, was their claim that the Resurrection had already taken place! Paul then would have great cause to worry and want to reassure the church, by his own suffering if needed, that the hope of the Resurrection and eternal glory was still ahead of them.

        And again the “obtain” of II Tim 2:10 (ugchanó) is “to hit the mark” – the word is the opposite of sin, “to miss the mark.” -.
        That is, “that they may also hit upon the mark of salvation in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.” https://biblehub.com/greek/5177.htm

        Perhaps theoretically that could refer to getting faith so as to be saved, but that seems a strained way to take it and alien to the context. More likely it is used in the sense Jesus employs the term:

        “But those who are considered worthy of *attaining* the age to come and in the resurrection from the dead will neither marry nor be given in marriage” Luke 10:35

        Or the author of Hebrews: “Women received back their dead, raised to life again. There were others who were tortured, refusing to be released so that they might *attain* an even better resurrection.” Heb 11:35

        And considering the original manuscripts did not have verse breaks or punctuation, it’s worth considering I Tim 2:14 and beyond as well. While some translations throw in a “the people of God’ – there is no such thing in the Greek. It’s simply “These things remind [them,] solemnly charging [them] before God…” with the ‘them’ implied by the grammar in reference back to a plural group Paul has spoken of before. But what group? He’s referred to Timothy (audience of letter,) himself, reliable people, the elect, and to “we” which seems to be the inclusive of Paul and believers. Timothy is supposed to remind this group, so while he could be a part of the group referenced, it wouldn’t make grammatical sense to think Timothy needs to remind “we.” But “elect” is the next closest term and fits well as a plural group which Timothy can address:

        “These things remind [the elect,] solemnly charging [the elect] in the sight of God….

        As for Paul’s “also” it makes perfect sense grammatically. He suffers all the afflictions he has and will undergo for the sake of the elect, that they also [as well as himself] will attain salvation in Christ Jesus with eternal glory [at the Resurrection of the dead.] The other ‘category’ is not the ‘non-elect,’ but simply Paul himself.

        It would be like if I said, “I plan to buy and give out tickets and give rides to my friends so they also can go to Prom.” No one would think the ‘also’ implies I will be buying tickets for my enemies. Rather, the “also” just implies that I myself will be getting a ticket and driving to Prom.

      189. Jenai,

        Thanks for your thoughtful and well laid out reply.

        The below are not my words, but another brother in Christ (regarding 2 Timothy 2:10)….

        “I believe that this references to the Jews. Why would Paul add the description of Jesus being a ‘descendant of David’? David was a Jew. Who caused Paul such ‘hardship’? It was the Jews. Who chased him down from city to city, and had him stoned and placed in prison and treated as a ‘criminal’? It was the Jews. Yet, despite being an apostle to the Gentiles, Paul had a zealous passion for reaching the Jews. (Romans 9:1-5, 10:1-3, 11:12-14) That explains the expression, ‘they also’. It must be pointed out that Paul sometimes references the Jews by other expressions. Galatians 2: 7-9 states: ‘But on the contrary, seeing that I had been entrusted with the gospel to the uncircumcised, just as Peter had been to the circumcised (for He who effectually worked for Peter in his apostleship to the circumcised effectually worked for me also to the Gentiles), and recognizing the grace that had been given to me, James and Cephas and John, who were reputed to be pillars, gave to me and Barnabas the right hand of fellowship, so that we might go to the Gentiles and they to the circumcised.’ Another example is Romans 15:8: ‘For I say that Christ has become a servant to the circumcision on behalf of the truth of God to confirm the promises given to the fathers, and for the Gentiles to glorify God for His mercy.’ It’s clear that Paul is making an indirect reference to the Jews. That seems to be the case at 2 Timothy 2:10 as well, given all of the aforementioned factors. Moreover, I believe that the Jews are specifically called ‘elect’ by Jesus, insomuch that the Jews have an election in Abraham. At Matthew 24:22-31, Jesus specifically discusses what I believe must exclusively be the Jews. Yet, despite all of their persecutions against him, Paul’s desire was that they ‘may also obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus.’ (2nd Timothy 2:10) This is because Paul still dearly loved his Jewish brothers, so much so, that he made this statement: ‘My heart is filled with bitter sorrow and unending grief for my people, my Jewish brothers and sisters. I would be willing to be forever cursed – cut off from Christ! – if that would save them.’ (Romans 9:2-4, NLT) Paul was willing to be forever cursed, if that would satisfy God’s justice and save his Jewish brothers. That shows just how much Paul truly loved his Jewish brothers who knew not what they were doing. Paul’s endurance of his mischievous Jewish brothers stems from his sincere love for them, and his enduring hope that they may also come to know Christ as Savior. That’s what Paul was referring to at 2nd Timothy 2:8-10.”

        I agree. The only thing I would like to add that my brother above left out is the following….

        Acts 28:17-20 (NKJV)….
        And it came to pass after three days that Paul called the leaders of the Jews together. So when they had come together, he said to them: “Men and brethren, though I have done nothing against our people or the customs of our fathers, yet I was delivered as a prisoner from Jerusalem into the hands of the Romans, who, when they had examined me, wanted to let me go, because there was no cause for putting me to death. But when the Jews spoke against it, I was compelled to appeal to Caesar, not that I had anything of which to accuse my nation. For this reason therefore I have called for you, to see you and speak with you, because FOR THE HOPE OF ISRAEL I am bound with this chain.”

      190. phillip is another message wrote, “So, if “the elect” refers to the Jews in 2 Timothy 2:10, then the other group (not an individual; we are contrasting different groups) other than “they also” would point to the “non-elect”, or the non-Jew, in this context, the Gentiles.

        Here, he cites another individual to say, “That shows just how much Paul truly loved his Jewish brothers who knew not what they were doing. Paul’s endurance of his mischievous Jewish brothers stems from his sincere love for them, and his enduring hope that they may also come to know Christ as Savior. That’s what Paul was referring to at 2nd Timothy 2:8-10.”

        This is contrary to what phillip has been saying. This individual says that “Paul’s endurance of his mischievous Jewish brothers” is derived from “his enduring hope that they may also come to know Christ as Savior.” Earlier, the individual said, “Yet, despite being an apostle to the Gentiles, Paul had a zealous passion for reaching the Jews. (Romans 9:1-5, 10:1-3, 11:12-14) That explains the expression, ‘they also’.” In other words, this individual says that Paul is only talking about the Jews in the flesh when he says, “the elect” and then his concern is that they, “the elect,” may also come to know Christ as Savior.

        Yet, phillip writes, “I agree,” when he has been disagreeing in his comments. So phillip, can you straighten out what I take this individual is be saying?

      191. I really don’t see the problem here, rhutchin. I really think everyone else reading along understands fully what has been put out there. You seem to be the only one struggling with this. Why, I don’t know.

        However, let me put it this way. The Father called them “the elect/the chosen ones” in the OT. The Son called them “the elect” in the four gospels. “The elect”, “the Jews”, “the circumcision”, are all synonymous with one another. With that in mind we have…

        “I endure all things for the sake of the circumcised, so that they also may obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus and with it eternal glory.”

        Do you see anything in that verse regarding the heathen/gentiles/uncircumcised? Not directly. However, salvation was not only to the circumcised (the Jews), but the uncircumcised (the Gentiles) as well. Hence, the “also”, which suggests someone other than the circumcised could (or may) obtain salvation. That other group, in direct contrast to the circumcised, would have to be the uncircumcised. Paul is saying that the elect/the Jews/the circumcised, could (or may) also obtain the salvation that the non-elect/the Gentiles/the uncircumcised were experiencing.

      192. phillip writes, “Do you see anything in that verse regarding the heathen/gentiles/uncircumcised? Not directly.”

        The key admission – “Not directly.” That is the point that I (and even TS00) was making. You are mixing translation with commentary to say, “Paul is saying that the elect/the Jews/the circumcised, could (or may) also obtain the salvation that the non-elect/the Gentiles/the uncircumcised were experiencing.” No one disagrees on that point. The only point at issue is what Paul meant when he used the term, “elect” and two viable positions exist.

      193. I’ll let my “other brother” answer this.

        “The phrase, ‘they also’, ruins this interpretation. If you take out they ‘also’, the Calvinist interpretation becomes more plausible, but who would want to subtract from Scripture? The text would look like this: ‘For this reason I endure all things for the sake of those who are chosen, so that they…may obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus and with it eternal glory.’ That would eliminate the contrast, and would make the calvinistically elect into the sole object.”

        Agreed. Your position would require “pulling a Piper”. Then we also have what brother Brian (objectively) has provided…

        “The context leans towards identifying the ‘elect’ as the same ones ‘on account of which’ he is willing to endure suffering, that they also (the ones causing the suffering) ‘may obtain’ salvation… but not certain they will.”

        1. “The elect” are the elect if they obtain salvation or not
        2. There is a high probability the “the elect” will not obtain salvation
        3. The elect are the ones who have imprisoned him and want him dead

        My viable position address all 3 points. Your viable position fails miserably on all 3.

        Hence, only one viable position, though painful as it may be.

      194. “Isn’t that horse dead already?”

        I wish.

        “And a bit off topic.”

        Please show me one article (one thread) on this website that has ever stayed on topic. 🙂

      195. Phillip
        I really don’t see the problem here, rhutchin. I really think everyone else reading along understands fully what has been put out there. You seem to be the only one struggling with this. Why, I don’t know.

        br.d
        We should have warned you in advance Phillip. One will observe over time with Calvinist here – that they see only what they want to see. What they don’t want to see doesn’t exist for them. At some point you will recognize – dialog with RH becomes tail-chasing. That’s just the nature of the beast.

      196. I understand, brother. I have observed the same with Brian interacting with rhutchin over the years. Whoever said “patience is a virtue” never tangled with a Calvinist. Still, had to try.

        However, to be fair, Calvinists are not the only issue here. Our Arminian brothers do the same. For them, “the elect” are those whom God foresees will have faith in Christ. Hence, they have believers, or those in Christ, wanting Paul dead.

        Ouch!

      197. yes I see.
        And I think also perhaps we are looking at the difference between general bible readers vs how a scholar approaches a certain text – “supposedly” with an open mind.

        When E. P. Sanders published his book “The New Perspective on Paul” it landed like a large bomb that exploded right in the middle of biblical scholarship. And things went flying in different directions. Some scholars who hold a death-grip on their tradition of interpretation adamantly rejected making any consideration of it. Others who are open minded and focused on discovering the N.T. author’s intent behind the text were open to applying his findings into their considerations to see how they would survive under scrutiny.

        The general bible reader however is more inclined to believe whatever he is told by someone he chooses as a voice of influence.
        That type of behavior is what kept Europe in the dark ages under the authority of the RC for so many years.

      198. BrD,

        Agreed. However, this behavior has been going on for centuries.

        John 12:42 (NKJV)….
        Nevertheless even among the rulers many believed in Him, but because of the Pharisees they did not confess Him, lest they should be put out of the synagogue

        Honestly, I am not overly impressed by “the experts”. Just give me someone untrained and thirsty for the word. Someone who is willing to think for himself and take the road less traveled.

        Again, I want to thank you for providing that quote (and additional support. I didn’t know it was out there). It says something about you. You, obviously, gave my position credence (when you could have just as easily brushed it off) and therefore were willing to do your own homework. I won’t forget it.

        Many blessings, dear brother.

      199. Thanks!
        And my hats off to you for being a discoverer in the process.
        While others simply accept and believe what they are told.

      200. Good morning Roger, I prefer not to get back into a discussion over this text – 2Timothy 2:10 Suffice to say that this context does not suggest in the least the teaching of individuals elect before creation unto certain salvation after creation. That has to be read into this text. The context leans towards identifying the “elect” as the same ones “on account of which” he is willing to endure suffering, that they also (the ones causing the suffering) “may obtain” salvation… but not certain they will.

      201. Brian,

        Thanks for chiming in, brother. I felt you didn’t want to (which is fine), but your insight and expertise is appreciated. Also, I appreciate your willingness to be open to other plausible interpretations, especially when they might come to odds with your own.

        You are a blessing.

      202. brianwagner writes, “Suffice to say that this context does not suggest in the least the teaching of individuals elect before creation unto certain salvation after creation. ”

        It identified people as elect without indicating a time frame for that election.

        Then, “The context leans towards identifying the “elect” as the same ones “on account of which” he is willing to endure suffering, that they also (the ones causing the suffering) “may obtain” salvation… but not certain they will.”

        That seems to play fast and loose with rules on antecedents, as “they” would, by rule, trace back to “the elect.”

      203. I also like Randolph Yeager’s translation:

        “That is why I have been enduring all of this – for the sake of the elect, in order that they also may obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.”

        Of course, “elect” here would be comprised of both Jews and gentiles.

      204. Phillip,
        I’m stunned here!!

        Why would any Calvinist quote this verse??

        “That is why I have been enduring all of this – for the sake of the elect, in order that they also may obtain the salvation…”

        Paul has to “endure” something “in order that….”

        Man is he taking credit for part of their salvation!

        If we said that anywhere near a Calvinist today they would immediately accuse us of “robbing God of His glory….cuz man cannot do anything ‘in order that’ another man get saved. That is 100% God’s job!”

        I present to you Paul….. the first and best non-Calvinist disciple!

      205. FOH,

        Maybe this is what Paul really meant….

        2 Timothy 2:10 (Calvinist Translation)…

        “Therefore I endure nothing, absolutely nothing, for the sake of the elect, because they, and they alone, will obtain the salvation which is Christ Jesus with eternal glory.”

        That’s what they want it to say. But…..NOT!

      206. Phillip:
        One of the things I noticed is how many times Calvinists start the explanation of a passage with “It doesnt really mean what it looks like” or “world here doesnt mean world” or “this is an anthropomorphism and it doesnt mean what it says…”

        There are hundreds and hundreds of these passages that they say “dont meant what they say.” Why they are all in the Word (misleading us about God if Calvinists are right) they can never say.

      207. Well, if true, brother, that is disappointing. Sounds like Catholicism to me. “Here. Its too complicated for you. I’ll tell you what it says. Trust ‘me’.”

        But, Calvinists do believe they are the “enlightened ones”. The only reason they are Calvinist is because of God’s grace. That’s what separates them from everyone else. God’s grace.

      208. Phillip
        Sounds like Catholicism to me.

        br.d
        N.T. Write does say that John Calvin was essentially a Catholic with a small “c”

      209. FOH writes, “There are hundreds and hundreds of these passages that they say “dont meant what they say.””

        Still with the feigned ignorance of the Calvinism he claims to have believed. FOH knows that Calvinists agree with the non-Calvinists on many things that the Scriptures tell us – they then argue that the Scriptures say much more than that. For example, without faith, a person cannot be saved. Calvinists argue that we must take all the Scriptures into account and not just some as FOH would like people to do. Why does FOH have to malign Calvinism to make his points. Why can’t he just say that he chooses to ignore certain verses and be done with it?

      210. GraceAdict,

        I understand. It can be frustrating, but we are supposed to be patient with our brothers and sisters.

        But, again, to his credit, Rhutchin has never been rude, hateful, or mean-spirited. And from dealing with other Calvinists, that’s refreshing in and of itself.

        Still, I have dealt with other Calvinists who have said to me “well, you have given me something to think about.” That, at least, showed a “willingness” to consider that other options might be viable.

        Rhutchin, to date, seems unwilling to yield to anything, which is unfortunate.

        I never thought I would have to teach grammar though. Not my field.

      211. GA,
        Sorry we must not have told you —when you started posting —- “RH is gonna just waste your time going ’round in circles.” Several of us dont answer him any more (thus I get accused of all kinds of things…cuz he knows I wont answer).

        But I do like to interact with those who have shown his huge mistakes. And you are right, he never admits them….. My favorite lately was the one about God sincerely offering salvation and people freely rejecting it.

        That is the “feel-good” side of Calvinists. But when they are feeling bold and in-your-face-ish they will easily proclaim that Limited Atonement means that God never intended to offer Christ to the 95%. There is no offer!

        But with the proliferation of words on websites you see more and more of them saying “God loves everyone …. in a certain way.” Piper even says Christ died for everyone “in some sense.” Here is his article: “In What Sense Did Christ Die For The Non-Elect?”

        https://www.desiringgod.org/interviews/in-what-sense-did-christ-die-for-the-non-elect

        This is a long sermonette of mish-mash of both sides of the position.

        He shows no shame to say in the same article….

        “The offering of his Son is the offering of salvation to the world.”

        “The new covenant is not an offer of salvation.”

        He even says this…..

        “Now, we’ll come back to this in just a moment to answer the question ‘For what tangible reason did Christ die for the non-elect?'”

        But he never comes back to it. Oh, he quotes John 3:16 and then says, “He loved the world so that everyone who believes would have life.”

        And that …..my friends is how Calvinists learn to talk like Calvinists one minute and Methodist-Pentecostals the next.

        That is how he answers the title of the article “In What Sense Did Christ Die For The Non-Elect?”

        Wow…… and people follow this guy?

      212. FOH writes, “My favorite lately was the one about God sincerely offering salvation and people freely rejecting it.”

        This is FOH rejecting the Calvinist notion that a sincere offer of the gospel can be made to those who do not have faith or that people without faith freely reject the gospel. What does Paul say, “the message of the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing,” Also, “we preach Christ crucified, to the Jews a stumbling block and to the Greeks foolishness,” Are we to think, as FOH, that Paul’s preaching of the gospel was not sincere or that the gospel was not freely rejected – even if we understand the severe constraints placed on a person through lack of faith?

      213. Rhutchin – you keep treating faith (noun) as something effectually granted from without, like God somehow gives some people trust itself rather than showing Himself trustworthy to keep His promises, and that being enough to persuade many to trust in Him when presented with the gospel message [The gospel message being in essence Christ revealing and accomplishing salvation and showing the way to be reconciled to God and inherit the promises for all those who will trust in Christ.]

        Let’s look briefly at Rom 10:17:

        “So faith [is] from hearing, and hearing through [the] word of Christ.”

        Much of the force of this is lost in English, as “from” can’t fully capture the Greek preposition “ek.” But basically, this shows the response “out of” the person’s hearing “to” faith; an internal process within the person in response to the hearing which has the outcome of faith.

        “1537 ek (a preposition, written eks before a vowel) – properly, “out from and to” (the outcome); out from within. 1537 /ek (“out of”) is one of the most under-translated (and therefore mis-translated) Greek propositions – often being confined to the meaning “by.” 1537 (ek) has a two-layered meaning (“out from and to”) which makes it out-come oriented (out of the depths of the source and extending to its impact on the object).”
        https://biblehub.com/greek/1537.htm

        See Matt 12:35 for another example of this preposition in action:

        “The good man brings out of his good treasure what is good; and the evil man brings out of his evil treasure what is evil.”

        Ek here is translated “out of.” Would anyone claim that Jesus is saying in that passage that “The good man is given good treasure, while the evil man is given evil treasure?” No. The motion is still ‘out from and to.’

        For other examples: The beam is to be removed out of the eye, not put into it (Lk 6:42.) Good fruit comes out of the good tree, it is not hung on to the tree (Matt 12:33) Jesus was called out of Egypt. (Matt 2:15)

        The second preposition of Rom 10:17 is dia, ‘through.’ Literally, it means ‘across’ (such as to the other side; think of the English term ‘diameter’.) We find it in verses speaking about things spoken of “through” the prophets or Jesus being perfected “through” sufferings or the promises being given “through” the righteousness that comes by faith. It’s often used to show something being instrumental to an outcome. But it doesn’t make the thing itself confer the outcome.

        Consider:
        Did a prophet speaking of the future (by inspiration of God) make the prophet the effectual cause of a future act?

        Did suffering, of itself, confer perfection on Jesus – of course not! Jesus proved himself perfect through the midst of suffering and His willingness to undergo it so as to fulfill the Father’s will and accomplish salvation.

        We see faith as tested by fire in I Pet 1:7. Does the fire give the faith? No! But the our faith is proved true on account of the fire – without the fire, no one could see that our faith was genuine (as the fire of the analogy will melt impurities or ‘fake’ gold.)

        Rom 4:13 speaks of receiving the promises through the righteousness of faith. Is it the imputed righteousness of Christ that confers the promises? No, it is God who confers the promises on account of the imputed righteousness of Christ which he credits to those with faith (hence why righteousness comes by faith.)

        Or in Matt 7:13-14: “Enter through the narrow gate; for the gate is wide and the way is broad that leads to destruction, and there are many who enter through it. “For the gate is small and the way is narrow that leads to life, and there are few who find it.

        We have to go through the gate. That doesn’t mean we effectually create the gate, or that the gate effectually makes us go through it. But we can only “get to the other side” on account of the gate’s existence.

        Back to Rom 10:17:

        The gospel shows us the way to the other side of condemnation: salvation. It shows us the way (Christ, the way, the truth, and the life; the door; the gate; the Savior, deliver; etc.) Hearing or otherwise being presented with the gospel is essential, as no one can know of the gate if he has never been told of it or seen it himself. But, as Rom 10 shows, physical hearing is not enough. The person must respond in faith, must believe “with their heart” – and this is not a faith conferred effectually from without by God or the gospel itself, but is out of the person hearing the gospel to the outcome of faith.

        Ethnic Israel, despite having understanding of the scriptures and prophecies of the Messiah which they studied, for the most part rejected Christ. They sought the Messiah – but didn’t find him because they were disobedient and obstinate. Gentiles, who had no comprehension of scripture or understanding of God’s promises or discernment of a redeemer, were flocking to Christ in droves at the presentation of the gospel. They didn’t seek God or even know of Him, but once the good news was shared, they could find God!

        Let’s conclude with a glance at Rom 10:20:
        “And Isaiah is very bold and says,
        “I WAS FOUND BY THOSE WHO DID NOT SEEK ME,
        I BECAME MANIFEST TO THOSE WHO DID NOT ASK FOR ME.”

        The verb “was found” is to find/discover, especially after searching. what is sought. How could the Gentiles be said to find God (after seeking) when they are also said to have never sought God? Because something changed! What changed? The gospel! The entire chapter shows that the Gentiles, who had never sought God, now *could* seek God since the gospel was now revealed to them and so Christ was made manifest! Now, Christ can say, “seek and you shall find” to them, with sincerity, because any and all of them can seek what is revealed!

      214. JR: “Much of the force of this is lost in English, as “from” can’t fully capture the Greek preposition “ek.” But basically, this shows the response “out of” the person’s hearing “to” faith; an internal process within the person in response to the hearing which has the outcome of faith.”

        I agree. That the person “hears” means that he gains assurance and conviction as that is faith. Such assurance can only come from hearing the gospel. However, not all who hear the gospel preached give any evidence of being assured or convicted of anything. This agrees with Paul, ” we preach Christ crucified, to the Jews a stumbling block and to the Greeks foolishness, but to those who are called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power of God and the wisdom of God.” Here we see that a person must be called if they are to “hear” the gospel. Then, Paul, “Moreover whom He predestined, these He also called;” Thus, those God predestined to be conformed to Christ, He then calls, and it is those whom God calls who then “hear” the gospel gaining assurance and conviction from it. Faith is generated from without as it comes from an outside source – the gospel. The person hears the gospel and for some reason that he cannot explain, gains assurance and conviction = or faith – and that faith manifests in the person calling on the name of the Lord to be saved.

        Except for the points above, your analysis was fine.

      215. Philip
        “Therefore I endure nothing, absolutely nothing, for the sake of the elect, because they, and they alone, will obtain the salvation which is Christ Jesus with eternal glory.”

        That’s what they want it to say. But…..NOT!

        br.d
        A Calvinist interpreting a bible verse always reminds me of a professional contortionist! :-]

      216. GraceAdict
        Maybe he is just trying to do something else here on this site… Just a thought…I

        br.d
        BING!

        99% of the Calvinists that have posted here (at least to date) have not come with any observable degree of open-mindedness.
        Most come wielding a library of talking-points they’ve been taught to memorize – as if they are Don Quixote slaying windmills.
        They’ve been taught a library of talking-points which are supposed to be GOTCHA statements for defending Calvinism.

        Many show up temporarily with that armament – and when it fails they may give up and leave.
        Others may get angry and start making personal attack statements – and if they go too far – Brian lets them know that tactic doesn’t meet SOT101 standards of civility. RH is a different game player altogether. He’s about as inventive as I think I’ve seen on brain-storming different ways of rewording Calvinism’s DOUBLE-SPEAK to make it APPEAR as much as possible as normal dialog.

      217. GraceAddict… please refrain from labeling anyone with a “lack of ability to see what the Scripture actually says”… or “willingly ignorant”. I treat those kind of comments as ad hominem. You can’t know those things for certain.

        I know of a number who have defended Calvinism or some other theology vigorously… who have changed. Keep praying and presenting the truth clearly, firmly, and with love. Thanks.

      218. Will do, I guess I had hoped this would be a site that primarily like minded folks could engage in thoughtful dialogue instead of one person a Calvinist setting the agenda for discussion and that turns into the only conversation that seems to happen. I think us lonely traditionalists out here in the Calvinist world are tired of hearing these same arguments over and over again… But that must be just me…(my mistake). I was hoping for something that it isn’t… keep up the good work.

      219. No… GraceAddict…this is not a closed forum just for traditionalists/provisionalists. And hopefully it can be a place where besides getting encouragement from other likeminded brethren, one can learn how to better deal with Calvinists for their good.

        Attacking their positions with truth and “grace” is welcome. But as you observed… you don’t have to respond. And the agenda is set by the original posts, none of which are by Calvinists. Keeping the focus on that subject helps.

      220. FOH writes, “Paul has to “endure” something “in order that….”
        Man is he taking credit for part of their salvation! ”

        Apparently, FOH is pursuing the path of contrived ignorance of the Calvinism in which he was once enamored. FOH knows what Paul said, “But by the grace of God I am what I am, and His grace toward me was not in vain; but I labored more abundantly than they all, yet not I, but the grace of God which was with me.” Paul does not seek his own glory in saying, “I endure all things,” because he says, “Christ we preach, warning every man and teaching every man in all wisdom, that we may present every man perfect in Christ Jesus. To this end I also labor, striving according to His working which works in me mightily.” and “For if I preach the gospel, I have nothing to boast of, for necessity is laid upon me; yes, woe is me if I do not preach the gospel! For if I do this willingly, I have a reward; but if against my will, I have been entrusted with a stewardship. What is my reward then? That when I preach the gospel, I may present the gospel of Christ without charge, that I may not abuse my authority in the gospel.” Paul is not taking credit for his preaching or the afflictions he endures. But FOH knows all this. So, what game is FOH playing by his feigned ignorance of this?

      221. Rhutchin writes… “I also like Randolph Yeager’s translation:

        ‘That is why I have been enduring all of this – for the sake of the elect, in order that they also may obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.’

        Of course, ‘elect’ here would be comprised of both Jews and gentiles.”

        O, Rhutchin, bless your heart! Even with this translation you still have to deal with the grammar. “Also” STILL introduces another category of people other than “the elect”.

        My understanding of the text still works perfectly (with Yeager’s)….

        “That is why I have been enduring all of this….for the sake of Israel (the elect), in order that they (the Jews/Israelites/the elect) ALSO may obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.”

        You are determined to read Calvinism into this text. As long as you insist on doing that, you are going to struggle (with scripture and grammar).

        Kudos to you on effort. But you are still flunking the course.

      222. I don’t often get the chance to stand up for rhutchin, so I will do so while I can. 😉 I also do not see that your proffered reading of the text is necessary. While all who read it will import their own definition of who the ‘elect’ are (I will avoid that debate), the verse itself simply appears to say that Paul bears all things so that the ‘elect’ – however defined – can also, with him, obtain salvation. In other words, he is doing as he has been charged to do – enduring much in order to extend the good news of the gospel to the lost, so that all who believe it may obtain salvation.

        One might argue that ‘also’ implies someone other than Paul, but it is certainly not a necessity, nor do I view it as the most logical reading.

      223. I appreciate your input, brother.

        In Calvinism, only “the elect” (those predestined to salvation) can obtain salvation. Paul would have to be included in that group so the redundancy of “also” would need to be deleted (which Piper was more than happy to do).

        If you take the more popular view that “the elect” refers to the body of Christ or believers, then the verse makes even less (biblical) sense. Believers have obtained salvation in Christ Jesus. And Paul knows that better than anyone. Whoever “the elect” are, its clear from the text that Paul considers them to be lost. And those who are “in Christ Jesus” are definitely not lost.

        Again, I am open to another plausible interpretation to this verse, but, so far, every attempt has failed. I am not saying that there isn’t another viable explanation (there very well could be), but one hasn’t been given here; nor have I read one in any of the bible commentaries (no surprise there). So far, as I can tell, mine is the only one that fits the immediate context, is consistent with the grammar, and aligns with other scripture.

        God bless.

      224. phillip writes, “Paul knows that better than anyone. Whoever “the elect” are, its clear from the text that Paul considers them to be lost. And those who are “in Christ Jesus” are definitely not lost.”

        Paul knows that God’s elect are to be saved through the preaching of the gospel. So, Jesus, ““Go into all the world and preach the gospel to every creature.” Paul says, “Furthermore, when I came to Troas to preach Christ’s gospel, and a door was opened to me by the Lord,… Now thanks be to God who always leads us in triumph in Christ, and through us diffuses the fragrance of His knowledge in every place.” Also, “I planted, Apollos watered, but God gave the increase.”

        The use of “also” by Paul is not a redundancy, but the acknowledgment by Paul that God saves His elect through the preaching of the gospel. To the Thessalonians, Paul writes, “we are bound to give thanks to God always for you, brethren beloved by the Lord, because God from the beginning chose you for salvation through sanctification by the Spirit and belief in the truth, to which He called you by our gospel, for the obtaining of the glory of our Lord Jesus Christ.” So, we have Paul enduring all things in order to preach the gospel because it is through the preaching of the gospel that God’s elect also obtain salvation even as Paul has.

      225. Once again, I agree with rhutchin. The ‘also’ most naturally refers to any other than Paul and all who have already obtained salvation. Surely one can see that not all obtain salvation until they hear and believe, which is why Paul and the other disciples were called to proclaim the gospel. He endures much suffering in order that the gospel can be proclaimed, and many who are not yet saved will ‘also’ hear and believe. It is a rather obvious interpretation. I’m find your claim that no one else has a meaningful interpretation unconvincing. 😉 We must all resist the temptation to read into scripture what we believe, and assert that there can be no other interpretation, simply because we don’t agree with those offered.

      226. Brother, I completely agree with your overall assessment. And I have stated that there very well could be another plausible interpretation. Taking your understanding of “also” we have…..

        2 Timothy 2:10 (NKJV)….
        Therefore I endure all things for the sake of the elect, that they (the elect) also (along with myself and those who have already obtained salvation) may obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.

        I think Piper (and Rhutchin) would agree with you here.

        But that interpretation still has issues (at least from a Calvinistic/Arminian point of view).

        Look at the comment brother Brian just posted…

        “The context leans towards identifying the ‘elect’ as the same ones ‘on account of which’ he is willing to endure suffering, that they also (the ones causing the suffering) ‘may obtain’ salvation… but not certain they will.”

        1. The elect are the elect if they obtain salvation or not (I agree with that).
        2. There is a high probably that “the elect” will not obtain salvation (I agree with that).
        3. The elect are the ones who have imprisoned him and want him dead (I agree with that).

        I agree completely that “we must all resist the temptation to read into scripture what we believe”. That is why my interpretation (if correct, though I could be wrong) has ruffled so many feathers.

      227. phillip writes, “My understanding of the text still works perfectly (with Yeager’s)….

        “That is why I have been enduring all of this….for the sake of Israel (the elect), in order that they (the Jews/Israelites/the elect) ALSO may obtain the salvation which is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory.”

        I think Brain ‘s take on this was consistent – “I endure all things at the hands of the unsaved Jews, that the X people may also obtain salvation.”

      228. rhutchin
        Paul wants the elect to obtain salvation also just like X category has.

        br.d
        Either you know what you’re trying to say here – and it just came out irrational – or its just irrational.

        Firstly – if we assume Paul holds to a form of Calvinism – your statement says ” Paul wants the elect to obtain salvation also just as the elect has.

        Secondly – if Paul holds to a form of Calvinism – then he AUTO-MAGICALLY assumes the “elect” are the FEW who Calvin’s god chooses. And the non-elect are the MANY whom Calvin’s god ordained for damnation. And these things would be an AUTO-MAGICAL given – just as much as Calvin’s god’s existence is a given.

        In such case your statement would be the equivalent of saying Paul WANTS DESIRES God to exist.

      229. Rhutchin…. “Paul wants the elect to obtain salvation also just like X category has.”

        br.d….. “Either you know what you’re trying to say here – and it just came out irrational – or its just irrational.”

        Yosemite Sam… “I’m thinking. My head hurts.”

        I can relate.

      230. Rhutchin,

        Not sure who “everyone else” is (perhaps this is referring to the “experts”), but whoever they are, they struggle with grammar. Sad. The elect are still the elect, regardless of “when” (past, present, or future). This lame attempt of an explanation continues to fail the introduction of another category or group of people, other than “the elect”.

        You might have numbers (even “experts”) on your side, but “might” does not make “right”.

        Still looking for closure, brother.

      231. Interesting! I was just thinking the exact same thing yesterday Phillip!

        rhuchin is wonderfully consistent – and provides us some totally incredible examples of Calvinism’s double-speak.

        Wonderful contribution!

      232. rhutchin
        The claim of Calvinism is …..etc

        br.d
        We already understand the type claims Calvinism makes are NOT LOGICAL claims – but SEMANTIC claims.
        For example, a gift is NOT ACTUALLY “offered” – but is SAID to be “offered”.

        These claims are not designed to make sense to LOGICAL people.
        But they are uses-full for Calvinists to perceive themselves as biblical

      233. TS00,
        Once again you are so right!!!

        They cannot have it both ways!

        They cannot say it is “offered to all” AND say that before the foundations of the world the atonement was LIMITED. According to them it was NEVER designed to be offered to all. How dare they besmirch the Calvinist version of God by saying it is “available to everyone.”

        Once again….the the thousandth time…. saying one thing one minute and another the next.

        Sure….sure…..if they want to change it to TUIP. But as a package TULIP deal the L strictly and clearly teaches that it was NOT offered to all.

      234. Well there you go….. the plucking the petals analogy works well since ….

        He loves me….(pluck)

        He loves me not….

      235. To add on to my earlier comment, many a Calvinist (and non-Calvinist) scholar has noted that the TULIP cannot stand without all of its planks. Total Depravity requires Unconditional Election and Irresistible Grace; Unconditional Election and Irresistible grace demand a Limited Atonement; and the existence of the previous four points lead unavoidably to a Perseverance of the Saints. It is an all or nothing deal.

      236. FOH
        Once again….the the thousandth time…. saying one thing one minute and another the next.

        br.d
        Bulls-eye FOH!

        William Lutz – American linguist – What is DoubleSpeak
        quote:
        Basic to doublespeak is INCONGRUITY.
        The incongruity between what is said or left unsaid, and WHAT REALLY IS.
        It is the incongruity between the word and the referent, between seem and be, between the essential function of language.
        What doublespeak does — mislead, distort, inflate, circumvent, obfuscate.

      237. I cannot imagine a more clear refutation of the ‘Doctrines of Grace’ than “Under Calvinism, God makes salvation available to everyone and anyone can freely choose salvation or reject it.” If they are now distorting things that badly, no wonder people are confused as to what being a Calvinist means. Listen up folks; if any Calvinist says that to you, whatever he means, it isn’t what you think it means.

      238. TS00,
        You are so right…. This is a classic statement….

        “Under Calvinism, God makes salvation available to everyone and anyone can freely choose salvation or reject it.”

        Limited Atonement….. it was never intended to the non-elect.

      239. “Under Calvinism, God makes salvation AVAILABLE to everyone and anyone can freely choose salvation or reject it.”

        br.d
        If a father does not PERMIT his son to have a gift – is it TRUE or FALSE to say that father made that gift AVAILABLE to his son?
        I think in order to argue that as TRUE – one has to abuse the term AVAILABLE.

        Here are the assertions of Calvinism:

        1) Whatever Calvin’s god RENDERS-CERTAIN – Calvin’s God PERMITS.
        2) Whatever Calvin’s god does NOT RENDER-CERTAIN – Calvin’s god does NOT PERMIT
        3) Where an individual’s salvation is NOT RENDERED-CERTAIN – and damnation is – the only thing that is PERMITTED is damnation – salvation for that individual is NOT PERMITTED.

        So we must ask the question – is it TRUE or FALSE to say the gift of salvation is AVAILABLE in a GENUINE sense – where the gift of salvation is NOT PERMITTED.

        Remember Calvinist arguments are not LOGICAL arguments.
        They are SEMANTIC arguments – and in SEMANTIC arguments definitions for words are twisted.

      240. TS00
        Listen up folks; if any Calvinist says that to you, whatever he means, it isn’t what you think it means.

        br.d
        Absolutely correct TS00!

        That’s why we call it Calvinist Double-Speak

      241. TS00,
        I dont think it is intentional, deceptive double-speak as much as it is they WANT to adhere to Calvinism but they dont want it to sound (be) as bad as it is:

        Created to be a vessel of His wrath: But God loves everyone…. in a certain way.

        Limited Atonement is true …. But Christ died for everyone ….in a certain way (this is all over Piper’s site).

        Limited Atonement is true….. But “Under Calvinism, God makes salvation available to everyone and anyone can freely choose salvation or reject it.”

        Total Depravity is true…. But man is responsible for his own decisions and choices.

        Sovereignty means absolute determinism…….. but man is responsible for his own decisions and choices.

      242. I get that. I really do. For the layman in the pew. Who simply absorbs what is tossed at him, trusting in the authority, wisdom and accuracy of those who present themselves as religious leaders. It is the leaders, the teachers, the writers of books for whom I have limited tolerance.

        If they don’t know better, they should. Should they not have invested at least as much time as I have grappling with such issues? Should they not, by now, know that there has been an ongoing debate on such issues for centuries, and that they owe it to themselves and those who follow them to study deeply, understand what they believe and express it in a clear, uncomplicated and honest manner?

        If you cannot do this, you should not be a teacher, pastor or public defender of Calvinism. Is that too harsh?

      243. TS00
        Did somebody just remove the ‘L’ out of TULIP?

        br.d
        I think this is just rhutchin here – and not what most serious Calvinists would enunciate.
        I am reminded that rhutchin’s posts manifest a consistent urgency to make Calvinism APPEAR as UN-Calvnistic as possible.

      244. TS00: “Total Ignoring of the countless explanations that faith is not a ‘thing’ (noun) that one receives but the noun referent to the verb ‘believe’, which is a chosen response to the presentation of alleged truth.”

        R: “Then again, “faith” may be the translation of the noun referring to a tangible quality received by the person and “believe” is the verb denoting the manner in which faith manifests itself in the person.”

        Persuasion is not a tangible quality. Tangible means “able to be touched” or “discernible by touch.” If I pick up an orange, the orange is tangible. Even wind is tangible in an abstract sense since it can be discerned by touch – air, not so much. Concepts like love, faith, hope, etc. are not tangible.

        Imagine this scenario: You’ve bought a house in another country, but have never seen it in person. Still, from photos and exchanges with the realtor you believe it exists and even were willing to sign a contract based in that faith. Now, you are going to sell your own home, leave your own country, head to a land you do not know, all while trusting that your new home has really been prepared for you.

        What is tangible in that scenario? The house (well, you have faith it exists, and if it exists it will be tangible,) evidence for the house (photos, realtor,) your country, the new country, and the written contract you signed. Your faith that the house exists or trust in the realtor and photos is NOT a tangible quality.

        For the believer, what is tangible is not belief but what he believes in – Christ. He has faith that Christ exists. He has faith he will receive all manner of other promises as well.

        Believing is just the active state of holding belief. Trusting is just the active state of having trust. There is no English word ‘faithing’, but if there were ‘faithing’ would just be having faith; being persuaded that the secondary evidence once is presented with is enough to prove the existence or reality of something.

        In other non-scripture Greek writings, the word for faith is basically used to mean a guarantee or warranty. The verb means trusting in that guarantee. The “trust” itself is not given people. Rather, people trust in the promise or not based on how strong/authoritative they view the guarantee.

        For example, if I see a salesman hawking essential oils on the roadside and guaranteeing they will make me look ten years younger and cure every ill I have, I won’t put much stock in his guarantee since he has no credibility with me and his claims are not seemingly backed up in any way – I would write him off as a snakeoil salesman.

        Conversely, if my doctor who had correctly prescribed medication for me before recommended an oil and guaranteed it would improve dry skin, I would be more persuaded to trust him and buy the oil, because he had credibility with me and I could seek other testimonies about the effectiveness of the product.

        No one has to “give” me persuasion – it isn’t even a concept that makes sense if given. (If you “give” persuasion, that’s hypnosis, not real persuasion.) But a person can do things and show things to be more persuasive! In God’s case, there is nature, history, miracles, scripture, prophets, apostles, testimonies, Christ’s ministry, Christ’s death and Resurrection, the conviction of the Spirit, the gospel message, etc.

        Those who respond in faith ‘accept the guarantee,’ so to speak – they metaphorically sign the new Covenant in Christ’s blood and enter it, God baptizes them, they now live by the Spirit as they walk in faith looking forward to the rest of the promises they believe in.

        Those who reject the gospel and Christ do not accept the guarantee. They don’t see the promises as assured or don’t trust Christ’s claims. Or, they don’t *want* to believe due to love of sin, etc. I’ve listed many reasons from scripture that some don’t believe in other comments.

      245. JR: ‘Those who respond in faith ‘accept the guarantee,’ so to speak – they metaphorically sign the new Covenant in Christ’s blood and enter it, God baptizes them, they now live by the Spirit as they walk in faith looking forward to the rest of the promises they believe in. ”

        I’ll accept your explanation and conclusion above. You say, “who respond in faith.” Thus, “faith” engenders a response, that I identify with “belief” or “accept the guarantee.” Faith is having assurance and conviction (11:1) that “God is, and that He is a rewarder of those who seek Him.” (11:6) With such faith, people respond by doing something that I say is believing but we could call it “sign the new Covenant in Christ’s blood” (although that wording troubles me, but let’s go with it).

        I don’t think we are disagreeing on the basics, just how to expalin it.

      246. Jenai:

        Earlier today on another string I wrote that Calvinists often puzzle us by declaring back to us very non-Calvinist verses…. say “see….it says here…”

        Here is a case in point. Calvinists quote back Hebrews 11:6 as if it explains something for them!!!

        “6 And without faith it is impossible to please God, because anyone who comes to him must believe that he exists and that he rewards those who earnestly seek him.”

        No person in all of history would come up with Calvinism reading this. And certainly they would see the opposite.

        1. We must have faith (does not imply that it is only given to a few).

        2. God can be “pleased”. So much for the Calvinistic-Platonic idea that God does not have emotions….impassible. Our faith can actually please God!! Amazing….but true cuz He says it.

        3. “Anyone who comes to Him…” So much for the Calvinist idea that no one can come to Him!! Too-Dead they say.

        4. “…believe that He exists” So much for the dead thing.

        5. “…that He rewards…” Woah. Cool. He rewards. Of course for Calvinists the formula is Too-Dead, Given-Faith, Irresistibly made to come to Him…..THEN rewarded for that! Amazing! That’s not a reward!

        6. “…earnestly seek Him…” There are many more verses saying we can and should see Him than the one Romans 3 poetic proof-text they use.

        So….. nah…..this whole verse and whole chapter is the anti-Calvinism Chapter….

        They try to whisk it all away by saying “Yeah but God gives the faith that He then rewards.”

        But again I ask….. what then is the point?

      247. Precisely. If God simply wanted a people of faith, and he then, unilaterally and irresistibly, gave one part of his now totally depraved, dead human race said faith and life, why didn’t he just do that in the first place? Because centuries of hatred, murder, war, oppression, rape and genocide sounded more interesting? Because he had such an egotistical need to show his stuff that he couldn’t resist a little mass genocide to impress the ones he ‘loved’? Sheesh, who can even make such stuff up?

      248. FOH writes, “Here is a case in point. Calvinists quote back Hebrews 11:6 as if it explains something for them!!!”

        LOL!!! Hebrews 11:6 says, “And without faith it is impossible to please Him, for he who comes to God must believe that He is, and that He is a rewarder of those who seek Him.” According to Calvinism, Hebrews 11:6 defines faith as, “…believe that God is, and that He is a rewarder of those who seek Him.” Nothing more; nothing else. FOH knows this, so why doesn’t he mention this in his comment. Sounds suspicious to me.

        Then, “4. “…believe that He exists” So much for the dead thing.”

        Yes. Anyone who believes that God exists has faith and is alive and not dead. So, what is FOH’s point???

        Then, “5. “…that He rewards…” Woah. Cool. He rewards. Of course for Calvinists the formula is Too-Dead, Given-Faith, Irresistibly made to come to Him…..THEN rewarded for that! Amazing! That’s not a reward!”

        Again, a person must have faith – therefore, be alive – to believe that God rewards. So again, what is FOH’s point???

        Then, “6. “…earnestly seek Him…” There are many more verses saying we can and should see Him than the one Romans 3 poetic proof-text they use.”

        FOH is correct. He also knows that a person must have faith to earnestly seek God and that faith comes from hearing the gospel. Why didn’t he mention that. So again, what is FOH’s point???

        What game is FOH playing???

      249. I know you won’t respond, FOH, but it is quite obvious who is playing games. Your logic is valid.

      250. You are so funny! You knew I would not respond and indeed had already deleted that childish response saying to myself….. if I had a nickel for every childish RH jab at me, I would be a rich man!

        Here’s that verse again…..so sweet:

        6 And without faith it is impossible to please God, because anyone who comes to him must believe that he exists and that he rewards those who earnestly seek him.

        Not only does He reward those who seek Him but in His word He tells the world that He “commends” them.

        2 This is what the ancients were commended for.

        4 By faith Abel …..he was commended as righteous

        5 By faith Enoch ….For before he was taken, he was commended as

        39 These were all commended for their faith…

        What a crazy hermeneutic …….

        God picks certain people to give faith to. He foists it on them (they have no choice in the matter; they must use the faith He foisted on them). They exercise that faith. Then He commends them for it.

        Only in Calvin’s world does that make sense.

      251. Yes, and anyone who steps outside of the Calvinist script and looks at the logic will quickly recognize its absurdity. I once did not understand the critics who pointed out that Calvinism has a certain internal logic, as in all five points lead to one another, but that it is completely lacking in logical consistency to scripture and reality. I now know exactly what they mean.

      252. Each person has a microscopic disk inserted into the brain – called the TOTAL DEPRAVITY disk.
        The disk contains all neurological impulses that will be processed in the brain.

        If that person is designated “elect” – the disk will at some point be replaced with one that contains SAVED neurological impulses.

        But in either case – the individual is totally unaware that neurological impulses occurring within his brain were determined by someone external to himself before he was created. :-]

      253. Jenai R: ‘Those who respond in faith ‘accept the guarantee,’ so to speak – they metaphorically sign the new Covenant in Christ’s blood and enter it, God baptizes them, they now live by the Spirit as they walk in faith looking forward to the rest of the promises they believe in. ”

        br.d
        Its wise to remember phrases like “respond in faith”, “accept the guarantee”, “sign the new covenant”, “live in the spirit”, “walk in faith” etc- etc – etc ……are classified in Calvinism as the AFTER EFFECT of a supernatural influence that is projected onto the individual – and the power of that spell that is cast upon the individual is such that the individual CANNOT RESIST it.

        So the Calvinist can agree with all such statements.

      254. br.d,
        Yes…and what they also say comes AFTER regeneration is “born of the Spirit” “given new life” “born again” “living in Christ” “alive in Christ”.

        So….Calvinists say that dead people are “regenerated” (given life), then they express their faith, and are then given life (again) in Christ.

        So….Calvinists say that dead people are “regenerated” (given life) then express their faith, then are born again (again).

        So….Calvinists say that dead people are “regenerated” (given life) then express their faith, then are made alive (again) life in Christ.

        Sproul’s famous “regeneration precedes faith” is also

        “(new life) regeneration precedes regeneration” and

        “(new life) regeneration precedes new life”

        The ordus salutis (they like to talk in Latin— cuz Augustine was a Catholic priest) is regeneration, foisted faith, then regeneration.

      255. I responded to this idea that Paul being called “specially” shows that God does that exceptionally. If He did it all the time to every person then there is no sense to the “special call” of Paul, Jeremiah, and David (the ones I mentioned in the previous post).

      256. Total Ignoring of the countless explanations that faith is not a ‘thing’ (noun) that one receives but the noun referent to the verb ‘believe’, which is a chosen response to the presentation of alleged truth.

        He who hears God’s revelation of who he is and what he promises has a choice: he will either believe and receive the declared revelation, or he will deny and reject its veracity.

      257. TS00 writes, “Total Ignoring of the countless explanations that faith is not a ‘thing’ (noun) that one receives but the noun referent to the verb ‘believe’, which is a chosen response to the presentation of alleged truth.”

        Then again, “faith” may be the translation of the noun referring to a tangible quality received by the person and “believe” is the verb denoting the manner in which faith manifests itself in the person.

      258. Sorry for the double post. My phone didn’t recognize me, and couldn’t tell if it posted.

    2. Hi Rhutchin,

      The “supernatural” clarification can be found under the comments of the blog, not Olson’s original blog post. Sorry if my reply was confusing, I did mention “and the comments.” But my article above is not specifically to the point of supernatural enabling, just any ‘further’ enabling beyond the graces God already gave at the gospel and cross.

      That is, pretty much all Christians would agree that with neither gospel or dreams/visions or some method for a person to here the gospel, no person could believe. For a person to be “able” to accept the gospel in faith, he must first hear the gospel or read about it or otherwise be presented with it. That is why many of us say the gospel “enables” man to believe, since it reveals to the fallen person that he is a sinner, that there is a Savior, that God will graciously grant him salvation if he believes, etc. No human in the world who had never heard of Jesus in the gospel in any way would think up the gospel out of their own head.

      But when many Arminians speak of enabling grace, including Dr. Olson, that is not what they are talking about. Rather, because most Calvinists and Arminians hold to the underlying assumption of total depravity, that fallen man cannot have faith even when confronted with the gospel, then something else must happen before the sinner can believe. For Arminians that ‘something’ is usually viewed as a special act of the Holy Spirit, to everyone who hears the gospel, to enable them to believe such as freeing the mind or will. For Calvinists the ‘something needed’ varies quite a bit more, but is usually either prior regeneration, partial regeneration, God overwhelming a person with proof, God just giving a person faith, the faith of Jesus being effectually applied to a person, etc.

      The crux of my argument above isn’t to dive into the relative strengths of all these positions, but rather address the charge that one essentially has to pick between belief in the theory of Total Inability (man is unable to believe) and belief that man, not God, initiates salvation – as if the only options were Calvinist, Arminianism, or Semi-Pelagianism. And as demonstrated, there is no logical reason to believe rejection of the theory of Total Inability (whether one personally thinks that wise or not) would make one have to belief man is the initiator of salvation.

      *****

      “The issue of TD/TI is the condition of man’s spirit – is the lost person spiritually dead and thereby unable to respond to God and if so, what must God do to negate that condition”

      That wasn’t the topic of my argument. But let’s assume for a moment that theory of Total Inability is true in all parts, and fallen man cannot believe. Now let’s imagine half the church still rejects that idea. Does that mean those people who reject the idea must believe man saves himself or initiates his own salvation? No. They could still believe all the verses I posted above in my essay and more. Even if they were to believe ‘wrongly’ on the topic of Total Inability (as you, for example, might think they do) this would not logically entail that they must believe God initiates salvation.

      Now, let’s assume for a moment that Total Inability is false. Could anyone tell God that logically there must be either Total Inability or man must initiate salvation? I think God would have a laugh at that idea that if the fall of man did not make faith impossible for men when confronted with the gospel then God has to give man the credit for salvation.

      So if false it would not make “man initiate salvation,” and if true would not make anyone who wrongly believed otherwise have to think “man initiates salvation.” The charge that “man initiates salvation” is the only alternative to Total Inability for others to believe, then, is incorrect. It’s a false dilemma.

      “An argument is then given to answer the question, “What does it mean for God to initiate salvation?” The ensuing argument leaves out any Scripture that Olson or a Calvinist would point to in support of TD/TI This allows the author to say, “Below you will find brief comments of other passages which all Christians should be able to agree shows that God initiates that, we would argue, do not require Total Inability.” Leave out the opponents argument and you can easily argue your position. But, so what?”

      Are you disagreeing that God initiates salvation? If not, I fail to understand your point. My essay above is not an argument, specifically, against the theory of Total Depravity. That’s it’s own topic. My article is about the charge that disbelieving in total depravity (not finding it personally scripturally supported or implied, etc.) would make a person “have” to believe that man initiates salvation, or the idea that man initiating salvation, not God, is the only possible alternative to the theory of inability. One can show that a line of reasoning is fallacious without needing to go into detail on every premise that feeds into it. The line of reasoning would fail *even if* Total Inability was assumed true, as I just demonstrated in this comment.

      “I don’t think this. The argument is not whether man initiates his salvation but whether man cooperates in his salvation – God does His part and man does his part to procure salvation.”

      I’m pretty sure Dr. Olson’s blog said “initiate salvation” not “cooperate with.” I don’t think you get to move the goal posts for someone else’s claim and pretend that’s what the argument is actually about. 😉

      But briefly, you’ve introduced so many English terms here it’s near impossible to know what you are meaning or if it is even a bad thing. Man *accomplishing* part of salvation would not be possible. Man cooperating with a would-be-deliverer by acknowledging he needs a rescue and accepting the rescue? Fully possible. If you mean procure as in merit or go out and obtain by some effort or skill – impossible. If you mean procure as in welcome a freely offered gift which someone else did all the work for, or accept an invitation into a covenant, and then be graciously granted the rewards and promises following that, such as in Jn 1:12 and Heb 6:15, etc. – no problem.

      “”Then, ‘Also, why do you specifically believe that someone rejecting the Calvinist/Arminian theory of Total Inability would necessitate his rejecting all the ample passages of scripture (many listed in the above post) as to how God graciously initiates salvation?”

      “I don’t believe that.” Great! You aren’t the intended audience of this article then. This is written to those who do believe that rejecting the theory of Total Inability must mean one believes God initiates salvation. (Or, more broadly as already mentioned, that thought that Total Inability must be true ‘else’ man would initiate his own salvation.)

      “Certainly God initiates salvation – the question being, To what degree must God act to enable a person to be saved.”

      That’s not the question of this article, it’s a different question. Interestingly enough, though, the concept of ‘degrees’ is related.

      Imagine four men, C, D, E, and F, live in a desert in a small shack. Unbeknownst to them, the house is slowly sinking and a distant sandstorm is on the way. Without intervention, they will both perish in their ignorance. A traveler comes and tells them of the danger, and offers to guide them to a distant Oasis and provide a home for them there. C believes the traveler and the traveler offers him a pack for a journey. But the other two refuse to come. The traveler offers them a telescope so they can now see both the distant sandstorm and lush Oasis, and shows them the exact spots in the house which are buckling. D decides that is proof enough for him, and the traveler gives him a pack for the journey as well. But E and F are stubborn. Perhaps the storm will change direction. Perhaps they can fix up the house. So, the traveler reaches over and scoops F up, carrying him out of the house and tying him to a camel. C, D, and restrained F all head out on the journey with the traveler, eventually coming to the Oasis and getting a new home, where finally F realizes that the traveler was right and thanks him for forcing him to come along.

      Now, in every case above, the traveler initiated ‘saving’ the men from the sandstorm. But their responses showed various degrees of action by the traveler. For one, telling of the danger and promising a safe haven was enough. For the second, opening the man’s eyes and overwhelmingly proving the danger and promise is real. For the third, he just chose of himself to drag the man to safety. For the fourth man, well, he’s buried in sand.

      While that’s an imperfect analogy, it should be clear enough that differences in the degree of persuasion or even force that an initiator uses wouldn’t change his position as initiator.

      ” If TD/TI is correct, then certain actions are called for and Calvinists and Arminians can cite Scriptures detailing these actions. If ane argues that TD/TI is not correct, then those Scriptures may be ignored as the essay above does.”

      I’m a little confused as to your meaning here. The essay wasn’t about directly evaluating the theory of total inability. But the article above does give many, many actions God takes to initiate salvation. It even mentions that the list is non-exhaustive. I’m pretty sure some verses often used as support verses for Total Inability made it into the mix. If you feel a verse has been ignored, feel free to post it – but please understand that someone not talking specifically about a topic they weren’t claiming to talk specifically about doesn’t mean they are ‘ignoring’ verses.

      I cannot stress this enough: this article is about a specific line of reasoning and why it fails. It is not specifically about the relative strength of different premises. While comparing premises would be a great topic, it’s not this one.

      “The answer is, Yes. Under Total Depravity, a person cannot respond to the gospel for two reasons – (1) he is spiritually dead, and (2) he has no faith with which to respond. If one rejects this notion of TD, then the presumption is that faith is inherent and something a person is born with. The person has a faith that seeks an object for his faith. If a person has no faith (thereby being TD), and can only receive faith through the hearing of the gospel, then of course, God becomes the initiator of salvation through His gift of faith (among many other graces).”

      You set up several false dilemmas here and assume many premises – this does not prove your point. No non-Calvinist “presumes” that faith is something humans are “born with” – I suggest you ask people what they believe rather than assume it. Furthermore, you just present one way God could initiate salvation – that doesn’t disprove other ways or make other ways less of an initiation. Even in your own view you mention the necessity of the gospel – why do you think God only “becomes” the initiator after that if He gives faith? With all due respect, your view would seem to make God out to be less of the initiator for salvation, since apparently graces given prior to faith are not counted as initiation? It is confusing, to say the least.

      In scripture, faith is a type of response to evidence or testimony. It is the inborn persuasion that something is true, even if we do not have direct proof/sight. For example, a child trusting the testimony of a teacher that germs are real, even when the child cannot see them, is ‘faith’ in germs. Faith in Christ, then, is not bound to be either something “born with” or something effectually given by someone else (indeed, the latter would make it more like proof, which would seem to defeat the point.)

      The term scripture uses for ‘receiving’ Christ is lambanó, https://biblehub.com/greek/2983.htm, which is to actively, personally, take what is offered. This ‘taking of a gift’ is treated as equivalent to believing in the name of Christ. So faith is not something effectually granted – rather the object of faith (Christ) is revealed to us through the gospel message, testimony, etc. We then either receive Christ in faith or refuse Him and stand condemned.

      When you say “Faith is a gift” I am assuming you are referencing Eph 2:8? But in Eph 2:8 the gift is *salvation, by grace and through faith.*
      ‘Faith’ and ‘grace’ are in the feminine gender, but the gift of God is in the neuter gender. In Greek, this then applies the ‘gift’ to the entire clause. There is no grammatical way to make faith the gift (‘nearest antecedent’ only applies when the genders match.)

      The process of salvation is taken as a whole in regards to source, reason, and mechanism. Paul contrasts salvation by grace and through faith with ‘works’, for man cannot achieve salvation by his own merit.

      It’s a similar train of thought to Rom 5:18-21. While we were all condemned by the law and sin reigned, the death of Christ brought justification by His own blood. In this grace reigns (the ‘by’), through righteousness and through Jesus (the process), to bring eternal life (the ‘what’). The process is given in even more detail in Rom 3:22-26: Righteousness is given through faith to all who believe. We are justified by grace, through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus. God displayed Christ publicly (grace) as a propitiation (atoning sacrifice) whose blood is applied to us through faith. These and other similar passages are summaries of the gospel; that while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us. We receive Him by faith and are justified, receiving the righteousness of Christ in place of our own sins, and will never perish but will have eternal life. (Tit 3:3-8, Heb 10:22, II Tim 1:9-11, 2 Corinthians 5:21)

      I agree that man is spiritually dead. I would guess we mean different things by it. I see the fallen nature of man as meaning we are corrupted by the flesh, slaves of sin, lawbreakers under the penalty of death, etc. I do not see it as scripturally or logically meaning that fallen man is “unable” to repent and believe when he hears the gospel message.

      As for premise 2, “he has no faith with which to respond” that makes little sense, so I would disagree with it, for the scripture and reasons I just got into above. Even if he has “no faith” before he hears the gospel, he can put faith in what he hears the same way the child who may have formerly thought demons or bad odors caused sickness can put faith in the existence of invisible organisms when the teacher explains germs. “The person has a faith that seeks an object for his faith” also makes little sense. Faith as a noun is what we believe in (Christ is Lord, etc.) Faith as a verb is the act of believing. Faith only exists if it has an object, it doesn’t ‘seek’ an object. As to the last point, humans believing in Jesus upon hearing the gospel (Rom 11, etc.) is not equivalent to God handing some people and not others faith. And God initiates effectual salvation when He baptizes the believer into His household, covers the believer with the blood of Christ, etc. as I detailed in my article. Faith itself is not salvation, so even if God did (as per your view) give people effectual faith that would not in and of itself confer or initiate effectual salvation. Salvation is the new birth, deliverance, forgiveness, reconciliation, etc. that God gives to believers. It’s a separate concept from faith. Faith does not save of itself; God saves those with faith, the condition He graciously gave. Huge difference!

      1. Woah…. that was nice and long!

        Your presentation is working for some of us, but I think you are assuming that RH responds to logic and scripture. Not really what we have seen.

        And as for CDEF and the shack: here is the Calvinist version.

        ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ are stone cold dead on the floor in the shack. The traveler “resuscitates” F and tells him that he “can now freely” get on the camel to leave. While F is considering his options…. being “convinced” and “reasoned with,” the traveler picks him up and carries him and ties him to the camel.

        While traveling, F asks the Traveler why He did not resuscitate any others. The Traveler tells him that they were not resuscitated because He did not want to, but anyway…..they got what the truly wanted. The Traveler also tells him that he (F) “freely chose” to come.

        Good News that!

      2. If I was ‘F’ I would be horrified and beg to be returned to the shack. Better perish than live forever with a crazy dude who kidnapped me and left my friends to die.

      3. JR writes, “For a person to be “able” to accept the gospel in faith,…”

        One does not accept the gospel in faith. We can speak of he gospel of faith as faith is conveyed through the gospel. From Hebrews 11, we know that faith consists of assurance and conviction; such assurance and conviction is conveyed to certain people who hear the gospel. It is this assurance and conviction that then leads a person to believe Christ. Faith provides the basis for one to believe. The gospel conveys assurance and conviction to a person resulting in belief. However, we seem to agree: Absent the gospel no one could be saved reinforcing TD/TI.

        Then, “But when many Arminians speak of enabling grace,…”

        The purpose of enabling (prevenient) or saving (irresistible) grace is to override TD/TI. Even you seem to recognize this in the necessity for the gospel to be heard. The issue is then to account for only some who hear the gospel and believe. Something else must happen to a person who “hears” the gospel before he “believes” the gospel. Thus, “…the underlying assumption of total depravity, fallen man cannot have faith even when confronted with the gospel, then something else must happen before the sinner can believe.” Technically, the underlying assumption of TD/TI is that a person cannot be saved apart from faith and faith is conveyed only through the gospel. If faith were conveyed to all who heard the gospel, then all would be saved. There is a need for faith. So the question, “Why don’t all who hear the gospel receive faith and believe?

        Then, “The crux of my argument above isn’t to dive into the relative strengths of all these positions, but rather address the charge that one essentially has to pick between belief in the theory of Total Inability (man is unable to believe) and belief that man, not God, initiates salvation…”

        The theory of TD/TI is that none has faith and thus is unable to believe. TD/TI requires that God initiate salvation by first sending the gospel out and then conveying faith (the assurance and conviction of Hebrews 11) to some, but not all, of those who hear it. If one says that the gospel enlivens a dead faith already residing in the person, and that faith is the basis for salvation, then one could say that the person initiates (or better, cooperates) in his salvation without such cooperation, he could not be saved.

        Then, “And as demonstrated, there is no logical reason to believe rejection of the theory of Total Inability (whether one personally thinks that wise or not) would make one have to belief man is the initiator of salvation. ”

        Without TD/TI, the gospel is not necessary to override a condition (lack of faith) that makes salvation impossible. It must only provide information to make salvation available. The person takes this information, chews on it for a while, and decides Yea or Nay. In this sense, the person is the initiator of his salvation (however, I think the Calvinist argument is that the non-Calvinist has a person cooperating with God in his salvation without such cooperation he could not be saved).

      4. Rhutchin –

        R: “One does not accept the gospel in faith.”

        J:
        “Now, brothers and sisters, I want to remind you of the gospel I preached to you, which you received and on which you have taken your stand. By this gospel you are saved, if you hold firmly to the word I preached to you. Otherwise, you have believed in vain.” I Cor 15:1-2

        We receive/accept the gospel in faith.

        “For if someone comes and proclaims a Jesus other than the One we proclaimed, or if you receive a different spirit than the One you received, or a different gospel than the one you accepted, you put up with it way too easily.” II Cor 11:4

        But what does it say? “The word is near you, in your mouth and in your heart,” that is, the word of faith we are proclaiming: that if you confess with your mouth, “Jesus is Lord,” and believe in your heart that God raised Him from the dead, you will be saved. For with your heart you believe and are justified, and with your mouth you confess and are saved. It is just as the Scripture says: “Anyone who believes in Him will never be put to shame.”… “Everyone who calls on the name of the Lord will be saved.” How then can they call on the One in whom they have not believed? And how can they believe in the One of whom they have not heard? And how can they hear without someone to preach? And how can they preach unless they are sent? As it is written: “How beautiful are the feet of those who bring good news!” Rom 10:8-15

        Hearing the gospel message is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition to have faith. The person must not just hear it, but believe it, and confess it. Note that no one believes because they are given undeniable proof or just handed belief on a platter, but they must “believe with the heart” (Compare this to the words of Luke 24:25, where Jesus calls the unbelieving Pharisees “slow of heart” to believe all that God said through His word and the prophets.) and “confess (agree)” that Jesus is Lord.

        R: “We can speak of he gospel of faith as faith is conveyed through the gospel. From Hebrews 11, we know that faith consists of assurance and conviction; such assurance and conviction is conveyed to certain people who hear the gospel. It is this assurance and conviction that then leads a person to believe Christ. Faith provides the basis for one to believe. The gospel conveys assurance and conviction to a person resulting in belief. However, we seem to agree: Absent the gospel no one could be saved reinforcing TD/TI.”

        J: Faith and belief (noun) are synonyms. Having faith and believing (verbs) are synonyms. You seem to be treating them differently. “Faith provides the basis for one to have belief” makes little sense since it means “trust provides the basis for one to trust,” in so many words. If you mean “The Faith” as in “the gospel” or “what is believed by Christians” such as it is used in Jude 1:3, then that would make more sense. The gospel does indeed make promises and claims to the hearer. And those claims are 100% true, and those promises 100% assured to the believer, which is what Heb 11:1 is getting at. But the “confidence” in those claims is not something conferred to certain people and not others. The hearer either welcomes the gospel and put confidence/trust in its claims and promises, or doesn’t. Then the hearer must confess/agree Jesus is Lord. (In some rare cases, the hearer may trust the truth of the message as even demons do, but still refuse to confess Jesus as their Lord!)

        I suggest you read Heb 11:1 in its context. You will not find that confidence is something conferred onto people, but rather the confidence of the patriarchs and others in the promise is what spurred them to continue following God, even without “seeing” the fulfillment of the promise. Note that Abraham reasoned/logically deduced that God could even raise the dead in order to fulfill a promise. Sarah supposed/considered that God was faithful. The whole chapter is about people who braved the wrath of rulers, gave up comfortable lives, or otherwise risked or suffered mistreatment, torture, imprisonment, etc. because they hoped for the future and had faith in the promises of God. Their faith was not because God “gave them” assurance, but because they trusted that God, due to His character and power, could and would make good on all His promises.

        Sometimes people stop at the end of Heb 11 – but Paul is building up an argument. The conclusion is in the next chapter.
        “These were all commended for their faith, yet none of them received what had been promised, since God had planned something better for us so that only together with us would they be made perfect.” Heb 11:40

        “Therefore, since we are surrounded by such a great cloud of witnesses, let us throw off everything that hinders and the sin that so easily entangles. And let us run with perseverance the race marked out for us, fixing our eyes on Jesus, the pioneer and perfecter of faith. For the joy set before him he endured the cross, scorning its shame, and sat down at the right hand of the throne of God. Consider him who endured such opposition from sinners, so that you will not grow weary and lose heart.” Heb 12:1-3

        The reason Paul wants us to focus on the promises of God, and look to those who suffered all manner of adversity while looking forward to the promises, is because we will likely face both opposition from sinners and the temptation to sin in our own lives. Keeping our “eye on the prize” helps us keep running the race. Focusing on the joy set before us helps us endure any torture or adversity. Looking to others who have gone through adversity and overcome in faith encourages us to resist sin. Considering Christ helps us not “lose heart.”

        Heb 3 and other passages of scripture have a lot to say on this topic as well.

        R: “The purpose of enabling (prevenient) or saving (irresistible) grace is to override TD/TI. Even you seem to recognize this in the necessity for the gospel to be heard.”

        J: Total Inability is the theory that fallen man cannot respond in faith *even if* presented with the gospel. Hence the term “Inability.” That someone believes that hearing the gospel message is a necessary for someone to believe in the gospel hardly mandates agreement with either the theory of Total Inability or of Total Depravity. It’s too bad we can’t insert Venn Diagrams…

        R: “The issue is then to account for only some who hear the gospel and believe. Something else must happen to a person who “hears” the gospel before he “believes” the gospel.”

        J: Perhaps this is the real crux of the issue, for you? Why some believe, and others do not? Scripture dives into many reasons some believe (awaiting the Messiah, disposed towards eternal life, simple childlike trust, understood scriptures, joy at the promises, humbly recognize they are sinners in need of forgiveness, love God when He is revealed to them, testimony of the martyrs, etc.) and many reasons some might not believe (love of sin, hardened heart in rebellion, love of self, pride, reject testimony of scriptures/God/prophets that speak of Christ, cares of the world, not wanting their sin exposed, love lies more than truth, etc.)

        Blaise Pascal has an excellent bit about this very quandary in Pensées. Trust can be based in so many things – from simple childlike acceptance to complex logical deduction – and no one way or reason for the persuasion that Jesus is the Messiah is superior to another, since no matter the “why” the end result is the same: the person trusts the gospel and is assured of all God’s promises.

        And no matter the reason someone personally rejects the truth, the end result is the same. All who reject Jesus stand condemned.

        R: “Technically, the underlying assumption of TD/TI is that a person cannot be saved apart from faith and faith is conveyed only through the gospel”

        J: Those are assumptions that come out of the theories, they don’t underly them. E.g. because man is totally depraved, he cannot be saved apart from faith; because man is totally unable, he can’t respond to the gospel in faith; because TD/TI, the man must get faith in another way, such as prior regeneration, being given faith, the faith of Jesus applied to him, partial regeneration, overwhelming proof given, etc. (there are at least five or six different ‘ways’ I have seen various Calvinists propose as the solution here. Some believe multiple. Yours would fall under the “given faith” variety.)

        R: “If faith were conveyed to all who heard the gospel, then all would be saved. There is a need for faith.”

        J: Faith is not “conveyed” to anyone who hears the gospel. Your base premise is incorrect. But there is indeed a need for faith for God to graciously grant salvation. The *object* of our faith, Christ, was revealed to man first in His Earthly ministry and then through testimony and the gospel. Hearers either place trust in those secondary evidences and the promises or don’t. They either change their mind/repent, or they don’t.

        R: “So the question, “Why don’t all who hear the gospel receive faith and believe?”

        J: I already got into that a little, but the ‘short answer’ is that many people are too proud to admit sin, love their sin, or are otherwise unwilling. Really, though, there are countless reasons some do not believe and countless reasons others do believe. Humility, a willingness to recognize one’s correct position as a sinner before God, does seem to be a common factor.

        R: “The theory of TD/TI is that none has faith and thus is unable to believe.”

        J: No, the theory of total depravity/total inability is that man is fallen/corrupted due to sin morally, physically, mentally, etc. to such an extent that man cannot work for or merit salvation (a point all Christians agree on) AND cannot even respond to the gospel in faith (the section referred to as Total Inability, and is not a point all Christians agree on.) Or in other words, that man is ‘spiritually dead’ and so ‘like a corpse’ cannot respond to the revealing light and draw of Christ through the gospel.

        It’s not “man doesn’t have faith, so is unable to believe.” The corrupt fallen flesh, not lack of faith, is the driving idea behind the theory of Total Depravity.

        R: “TD/TI requires that God initiate salvation by first sending the gospel out and then conveying faith (the assurance and conviction of Hebrews 11) to some, but not all, of those who hear it.”

        J: TD/TI requires a ‘solution’ so man can end up with faith – not necessarily the solution you personally believe in. For most Arminians, the solution is God simply ‘enables’ everyone who hears the gospel so they can believe (in the sense of some supernatural change to their fallen nature.) Now that the fallen person ‘can’ believe, some choose to and others refuse to. For Calvinists, the solutions vary. For some, like you, they believe faith itself is effectually given. Others believe the Holy Spirit regenerates a select view, making them born again so they can, and indeed must when combined with the theory of irresistible grace, believe. For others, they believe that Christ’s own faith in the Father is effectually applied to the fallen sinner. Yet others believe that only a partial regeneration is required, much like the Arminian thought, of mind or heart – but that the insight this gives is not resistible and all who receive it will necessarily believe. Etc. There is some cross-over, but you will find it is not an area of complete agreement among Calvinists over what precisely is required to solve the problem that TD introduced to begin with.

        R: “If one says that the gospel enlivens a dead faith already residing in the person…

        J: No one says this. You are presenting a strawman argument, and a strange one at that. The gospel presents Christ to the fallen sinner. The fallen sinner either is persuaded that the testimony is true or is not. They either believe or do not. If they receive Christ in faith (Jn 1:12) then they die to sin and the law, God raises them to new life in Christ and gives them the indwelling Spirit, God grants them the right to become a child of God, etc. Faith in Christ is not something waiting within a person to be made alive, or sitting without a person waiting to be effectually given. It’s a response, trust, a person has in response to secondary (non-‘sight’) evidence.

        R: “faith is the basis for salvation”

        J: It’s one necessary requirement, but not because it merits salvation or starts the process of salvation or is part of salvation. It is the basis because God graciously made it the condition, not because it would be worth anything of itself otherwise. Man couldn’t achieve salvation by works, but God wanted men to be saved, so God made the condition faith. (The implication in Galations and elsewhere that the condition was chosen because even a fallen human could trust in *someone else’s* work, namely Christ, or accept a pardon won by someone else.) The ‘true’ basis for salvation is the work of Christ and God’s gracious eternal plan as those are the underlying bottom layers, not faith. But it is fair to say faith is a personal requirement to be saved, so is a necessary thing even if not the true “basis” of salvation.

        R: “then one could say that the person initiates (or better, cooperates) in his salvation without such cooperation, he could not be saved.”

        J: Initiation and cooperation are very different things. This article was about initiation. As to cooperation, a person doesn’t cooperate/help with salvation by having faith, since salvation is not faith and faith is not salvation. God graciously grants salvation to the person with faith. It’s not that He “couldn’t save” a person without faith, but that God chooses to only save those with faith for the sake of His own character. If you accept a gift someone gives you, it doesn’t mean you cooperated with the making or buying or giving of the gift.

        Now, one could say that man cooperates with faith – that would be fair enough to say. Since both God and man are involved in faith (One offering the draw and testimony and revelation and good news victory has been one at the cross, the other trusting in that evidence) one could say they cooperate just as a person choosing to welcome a gift ‘cooperates’ in the acceptance of the gift as it is handed off.

        One way I have heard this termed is “Monergistic salvation, synergistic faith.” I think that is a fair enough assessment.

        But regardless of how one terms it, scripture never implies that it would be somehow terrible if man had the ability to repent and believe or that man trusting the gospel, without faith itself being effectually given, would make man partially responsible for actual salvation. Rather, scripture is pretty straightforward that fallen man needs to believe to be saved, but that it’s God’s gracious choice to grant salvation and eternal life to believers – not something faith merits of itself. God saves, not man. But it was His sovereign choice to only save those with faith, since only believers trust in the covering blood of Jesus Christ.

        For OT parallels, look at the deliverance of the Israelites from Egypt, or the deliverance of Israelites from the Angel of death.

        There were things the Israelites had to do: sacrifice lambs, apply blood to the doorframe, actually leave Egypt and keep walking/following, etc. Did God say, “Oh no, let me apply the blood for you, lest you take partial credit for my deliverance!” Or “Oh, here, let me irresistibly float you across the sea, lest onlookers think you cooperated with my miracle if I did something like ask you to walk.” Of course not! That they had to trust and follow and apply the blood did not minimize the deliverance and miracles of God. In the same way, our faith in the blood of Christ to cover us in no way minimizes the deliverance and salvation God graciously brings to those with faith.

        This will have to be my last reply to you on this topic. I’m glad we’ve been able to pack many of your underlying concerns, but it is apparent that you think others believe a great many things they do not and this is really affecting the premises you propose. I really recommend researching the views of those you disagree with to the point you could even argue them yourself, if needed, as this will really minimize the chance thinking or proposing that others believe other than they do (e.g. believe/propose strawman or prop argments rather than seeking understanding of others.)

      5. JR: “Hearing the gospel message is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition to have faith….”

        I agree. My point was that the gospel is the means by which God conveys faith to a person. It is by this faith that we believe in Christ. Faith is not the means by which we believe the gospel but faith is the means by which we believe in Him whom the gospel describes to us. Where you state, “We receive/accept the gospel in faith,” I would say, “We receive/accept Christ in faith – a faith derived from the gospel.”

        JR: “Faith and belief (noun) are synonyms.”

        I am not sure about that. For now, I take them to have separate meanings. With faith, one has assurance and conviction; in belief one acts on that assurance and conviction. Faith is a noun; believing is a verb. As you stated, …the hearer may trust the truth of the message as even demons do, but still refuse to confess Jesus as their Lord! Faith bridges the gap between believing that the gospel is true and believing in Christ and confessing Him as Lord. So, “…the confidence [faith] of the patriarchs and others in the promise is what spurred them to continue following [believing] God,” Where you say, “Their faith was not because God “gave them” assurance, but because they trusted that God,” I would say, Their faith was because God “gave them” assurance, and enabled them to trust God,” It is a technical point, I guess.

        More later.

      6. JR: “The reason Paul wants us to focus on the promises of God,…is because we will likely face both opposition from sinners…”

        I agree and think most, if not all, also agree.

        Then, ‘Total Inability is the theory that fallen man cannot respond in faith *even if* presented with the gospel.”

        This because TI says a person has no faith and cannot have faith without hearing the gospel. Thus, Christ’s saying, “He who has ears to hear…”

        Then, “That someone believes that hearing the gospel message is a necessary for someone to believe in the gospel hardly mandates agreement with either the theory of Total Inability or of Total Depravity.”

        That’s fine. Now you just need to explain what makes hearing the gospel necessary to convey faith without appealing to TI preceding that conveyance of faith. Go for it.

        Then, “Perhaps this is the real crux of the issue, for you? Why some believe, and others do not?”

        Of course it is. It was to explain why people reject the gospel that we get to TD/TI as the explanation. If you have an alternate explanation, let’s hear it.

        Then, “Scripture dives into many reasons some believe…and many reasons some might not believe …”

        Absolutely not!! People believe because they have faith; people do not believe because they do not have faith. People are saved by grace, through faith. For God to give a person faith is to ensure that they will believe.

        Then, “because TD/TI, the man must get faith in another way, such as prior regeneration,”

        Absolutely not!! The only way for a person to receive faith is through the gospel. Calvinists will say that regeneration is necessary to prepare a person to receive faith when they hear the gospel. I don’t think Calvinists disagree on this point and I really don’t know what you mean when you say “(there are at least five or six different ‘ways’ I have seen various Calvinists propose as the solution here….).”

        Then, “Faith is not “conveyed” to anyone who hears the gospel. Your base premise is incorrect.”

        Paul wrote, “faith comes from hearing, and hearing by the word of Christ.” If you can explain this otherwise than the Calvinist, do so.

        Then, “It’s not “man doesn’t have faith, so is unable to believe.” The corrupt fallen flesh, not lack of faith, is the driving idea behind the theory of Total Depravity.”

        Not in Calvinism. In Calvinism, the corrupted flesh is devoid of faith and thereby TD/TI. A corrupted flesh is necessary to TD, but is not sufficient to produce TD – it is the lack of faith that seems man’s condition.

        Then, “For most Arminians, the solution is God simply ‘enables’ everyone who hears the gospel so they can believe (in the sense of some supernatural change to their fallen nature.)”

        I am not Arminian, so I do not know. I suspect that Arminians understand that prevenient grace enables a person to receive faith once the person hears the gospel. I’ll yield to Dr. Olson on this point when he says, “It seems to me that the Bible does teach that the sinner in incapable of responding to the offer of saving grace with repentance and faith without a supernatural work of God…” I think he means that prevenient grace makes repentance and faith possible when neither is possible without preveient grace.

        I think we have bet this horse enough.

      7. rhutchin: ‘“The issue of TD/TI is the condition of man’s spirit …”
        JR: “That wasn’t the topic of my argument….”

        As both Calvinism and Arminianism take man to be TD/TI, he cannot initiate his own salvation (i.e., decide that he wants to be saved or to seek salvation). This is your conclusion also, but it is not clear why a person could not initiate his salvation under your system. However, you opened the essay with, “…there is a more fundamental question that Dr. Olson leaves unaddressed. Does spurning the idea that an unregenerate, fallen man is incapable of responding to the gospel in faith, the theory of Total Inability which is shared by Calvinists and many Arminians, mean that one must believe that man is “the initiator in salvation”?” Why would Dr, Olson need to deal with that issue? Given that you agree that God initiates salvation in the manner described in your essay, there is the presumption that you agree with Dr. Olson even if you disagree about TD/TI. You just need to explain what you see preventing a person initiating his salvation (e.g., by seeking atonement for his behavior) without any action by God and then pursuing his salvation once he hears the gospel.

        Then, “The charge that “man initiates salvation” is the only alternative to Total Inability for others to believe, then, is incorrect. It’s a false dilemma.”

        I commented to Dr. Olson, and he replied, “I am still confused about the role of the Holy Spirit in the “Traditionalist Baptist” (non-Calvinist, non-Arminian) soteriology.” For example, does the Holy Spirit convey faith to one who hears the gospel? Apparently not, since that position is a TI position – without faith a person cannot come to Christ. However, if a person already has faith apart from hearing the gospel, then the purpose of the gospel is to enable a person to initiate his salvation by exercising his faith. You seem to be saying that God initiates salvation just by making the gospel available without regard to what a person might do with it. Thus, your comment, “These all ‘introduce’ us to Christ, the good news of the Kingdom of God, and the way of salvation.” The gospel introduces the person to Christ and invites the person to come to an initiation and this cannot happen without a decision by the person to accept the invitation. So, you have God taking the initiative in a general sense to make salvation available to all but the person must decide (or take the initiate(?)) to accept that invitation. Each party to salvation initiates his part with neither part being able to complete the deal by itself. What is the role of the Holy Spirit in this process?

  4. Thanks Eric and Jenai. This is excellent. This is the absolute core and primary issue that begins one down one or the other soteriological paths. Everything else builds on this concept. I have spoken to many who consider themselves outwardly a Calvinist or partially Calvinist but when we talk a bit they open up that they have serious concerns about much of what Calvinism teaches, but they feel they have to consider it because they have first bought into Total Inability because they’ve never been exposed to good teaching that proves out that TI is not a biblical concept.and that if one rejects TI they are not “man-centered” or believing in “human initiation.” So once they buy into TI, they have to buy into either Calvinism or Arminianism as the answer to TI. I love to give them the “good news” that they aren’t stuck with those two alternatives, there is another way that is much more in line with scripture, is coherent, and begins and ends with God, not man.

    Great article and another good resource. .

    1. andyb2015 writes, ” So once they buy into TI, they have to buy into either Calvinism or Arminianism as the answer to TI.”

      No, they have to buy into God’s active involvement in the salvation of a person – through drawing, conviction of sin, etc., and thereby buy into TI. If one were to deny such involvement by God, he would outright buy into a Pelagian system.

      1. The above article is entirely about God’s active involvement in initiating both effectual salvation as well as His active role in drawing all through Christ’s death and ressurection and the Holy Spirit convicting the world of sin and initiating the offer of salvation by sending/revealing Christ, etc.

        But nothing in that would logically imply or mandate belief in Total Inability. Faith is not equivalent to salvation, nor does it merit salvation of itself, nor does it accomplish salvation of itself, nor would man even have thought to trust or need a Savior without God’s plans and provisions. It is God’s gracious choice to grant salvation to those who believe in His promise, not man’s idea or meritorious work.

      2. Jenai,
        You have done well. It is understandable, concise, and biblical. There will be some who “do not choose” to believe it (get it?) but of course life is full of choices….and what we think does make a difference.

        Now, you can expect from JTL some long repetition of “what must be” just….well just because he says it over and over.

        From RH you can expect name-calling: Universalist, proponent of works-salvation, synergist, or ….. even being a semi- or full Polynesian!

        Perhaps sprinkled into the responses will be the same 5-10 verses we hear over and over (“Yes, because you have never responded to these verse!”).

        So….stay the course and keep putting out material that others can read that will help them decide which position to follow…. cuz in the end, either we are “determined” to hold the positions we hold, or we choose them!

      3. FOH writes:
        “So….stay the course and keep putting out material that others can read that will help them decide which position to follow…. cuz in the end, either we are “determined” to hold the positions we hold, or we choose them!”

        So why do those who assert that all things are determined choose to even participate on this blog, or in any conversation concerning the topic? In all seriousness, if no one has a choice, and God’s chosen will unavoidably be regenerated, why don’t they just, pardon my frankness, shut up and go away? They have absolutely nothing to gain, and it would seem that they enjoy rubbing it in the poor damned men’s faces that they are not one of the lucky chosen few.

        It makes sense for those who perceive a choice to be made to reason and discuss the things of salvation with unbelievers. They have an offer that such men desperately need, however much they may not know it. Calvinists can only crow about what great luck they have to be one of the elect.

        The rest of us, who once did not believe, but made a voluntary choice to believe in and receive the astounding, undeserved love and mercy of God will most assuredly recall making that choice. We speak out because we long for all men to know and believe in this God who is lovingly, graciously, mercifully calling all men to himself.

        What brutes we would be to speak of this great gift if it was not genuinely offered to others. Even the child with basic good manners knows not to speak of a birthday party in front of those not invited. Yet Calvinists declare with glee, ‘Only we have been chosen. You all are going to hell. God’s name be praised.’ One can see why non-believers who perceive Calvinism as Christianity hate it. In actuality they hate Calvinism, not the true gospel of salvation.

      4. TS00,
        Exactly.

        And I have share several places on this blog that my nephew is one such hater.

        In his later years of high school, when he was a leader in the youth group, the church called a newly-minted YRR, Calvinist as youth leader.

        He pounded in “The Doctrines of Grace” so hard that my nephew (who is now PhD level brilliant) just did the math and now “hates the Gospel.” Such grace!

      5. TSOO I appreciate you taking this seriously & speaking up just as I respect all those on this blog. Even though I never bought into calvinism nor arminianism to me they were simply titles assigned to camps that seemed against one another. I appreciate the historical information, because it brings things into a little more clarity for me. I also love the analogies given, & the knowledge you all have of this subject and the willingness to talk about it. For me the big one is others are hearing about God in a wrong light and I view this site as a defense of God’s Holy character not that He needs us to defend Him, but also an opportunity to refute those who say; “this is what God says, because I said so or they said so” This site says Really line your systematic up with the only thing that really matters His Word & connect the time period to the text. I know I’ve heard (I think Br.d told me🤔) calvinists aren’t even certain they’re elect/ chosen. I was unaware of that aspect until coming to this site. Ugh really sad to me & the times I’ve questioned whether God loves me or not has not been during really hard times, but rather believing there was a slight possibility He was a calvinist God☹ so I’ve despised this systematic for awhile!! So please keep sounding the alarm even if you think they’re not listening!!! Your planting seeds🌻

        Jude 1:23 NASB — save others, snatching them out of the fire; and on some have mercy with fear, hating even the garment polluted by the flesh.

      6. I despise Calvinism for the same reasons that atheists do. Only more so, because of the dishonor it casts upon God and the stumblingblock it puts in front of those who might otherwise respond to the true message of freely offered grace.

      7. Jenai Rothnie writes, “The above article is entirely about God’s active involvement in initiating both effectual salvation…But nothing in that would logically imply or mandate belief in Total Inability.”

        Total Inability, and the Scriptures cited to demonstrate that position, was not argued. I think the goal of the article was to show that the lost are able to cooperate with God in their salvation – God provides the means – or grace (death of Christ, conviction of sin, etc) and the lost person provides the faith (maybe only the will) to believe.

      8. Jenai:
        It is a curious thing the Calvinists’ drum-beating for Total Depravity (Total Inability).

        They feel that they provide “verses” for this position, but there are actually whole-chapter stories that cover the topic well.

        The most spectacular event in the OT and the most cited/ recounted event in the Bible is Passover.

        God “did it all”. He provides the idea, the instructions, and the way of escape. Still they had to apply the blood in faith and stay in the house.

        Now…..when this story is repeated over and over in the Bible it always says something like “God rescued His people.” I mean never “they rescued themselves.” It would be silly to accuse them of rescuing themselves. They were slaves (like we were slaves to sin), and what’s more they had no Bibles, teachers, and for hundreds of years, no prophets.

        But obviously, with the kind of proof offered by miracles (just as Christ and Paul did that they might convince people, or bear witness) they had enough “ability” to respond in faith.

        Calvinist answer: God told them what to do and gave miracles to provide the witness…. but that was not enough. God had to give each of them the faith to put the blood on the door. It’s the Calvinist position. It’s just not in the Bible.

        But that doesnt stop them from saying it!

      9. ‘There is power, power, wonder working power’ . . . but only those who had the faith to apply the blood of the lamb by their own free choice received the promised salvation. God has supplied the blood of the once-for-all Lamb, but it’s power of salvation will only be received by those who believe in it, thereby applying it – through faith – by their own free choice.

      10. TS00,
        Not only is there power in the blood…there is power in the Gospel.

        Paul knew better:

        Rom 1:16 For I am not ashamed of the gospel, because it is the power of God that brings salvation to everyone who believes: first to the Jew, then to the Gentile. 17 For in the gospel the righteousness of God is revealed….

        The Gospel (preached Word) has the power and is the “righteousness of God revealed”.

        God reveals His plan in the Gospel….then men believe it or not.

        The blood has the power to save if applied.

        The Gospel has the power to save if believed.

      11. You make a good point. It is likely I would now reject the theology in that old hymn, as I do so many. The power is not in the blood, as if it is some kind of magic. The power comes from believing and receiving the promise of God. Were the power in the blood, no man would need to believe – all would be automatically forgiven of sin.

        Which once again demonstrates that the Calvinist and Universalist believe in the same deterministic fate; they only differ in how far its application goes. The genuine gospel message of salvation is that salvation rests solely upon our faith in the atonement has been accomplished, by God alone, with no contribution from man. Were the power in ‘the work’, i.e., the blood, all would be saved. The power to receive new life comes as a result of our believing in the promised salvation of God and desiring it above all else. This is a faith that results in changed lives.

      12. TS00,
        We have made this point before. Calvinists and Universalists are twin brothers. One is just taller than the other.

        Both agree that God, ex cathedra, with no hint whatsoever of participation, agreement, or free-will of man decides people’s fate.

        Universalists declare that He decides that all will be saved and none damned. Calvinists declare that He decides that a few will be saved and most damned. The difference is only in the number.

        Again, If God had wanted to create a world where either of those is correct, He could have. The Bible does not seem to say that He did.

      13. FOH writes:
        “The Bible does not seem to say that He did.”

        You, of course, are understating the situation, as a very good case can and has been made that the bible sets forth a far different story, again and again, than one of Divine Determinism. 😉

      14. TS00 writes, “Which once again demonstrates that the Calvinist and Universalist believe in the same deterministic fate; they only differ in how far its application goes. ”

        Yes. The Calvinist says God saves some but not all; the Universalist says God saves all.

      15. And the biblicist says God desires to save all, and freely offers to do so – but the choice is left to each individual, thus some will refuse.

      16. FOH quotes Romans, “because it is the power of God that brings salvation to everyone who believes: first to the Jew, then to the Gentile.”

        So not to everyone but only those who believe. These are those first given to Christ by God who thereby come to believe. The focus here is not on individuals but on Jews and gentiles. Thus, the gospel in the power of God that brings salvation to Jews and non-Jews, a theme that Paul develops later in Romans.

    2. I find it very troubling that ‘scare tactics’ are often used to quell free discussion in various controversial topics. One side (or multiple sides) will in a sense ‘frighten’ those just beginning to study a topic by claiming that to believe another side’s view would be equivalent to being a heretic, or a cult, or stupid, disbelieving Christ, arrogant, etc. One can expect that sort of bludgeoning of character or intellect or spirituality, vs. relying on scripture and reason to persuade others of a view, out in the secular world – but it is still sad to see within the church.

  5. Jenai, thanks for sharing. Your points are clear and logical. Don’t expect rhutchin to admit that, however. He is committed to his belief system, and no amount of clear, consistent, logical evidence is going to have any effect. The logical fallacies of Calvinism have been shown and discounted by many, going back hundreds of years. Calvinism’s only strategy at this point is to ignore sound arguments and play word games to avoid acknowledging logical and scriptural inconsistencies.

  6. God is the initiator of Salvation. God must do it for the reason that man cannot do it for themselves. What’s the reason why they cannot do it for themselves? The answer is that the fallen man, has been spiritually dead and has been separated from a holy God due to sin. God the Father’s drawing sinners to come to the Son and the quickening of the Holy Spirit to the reprobates are just one of the means of God’s initiatives to effectually reach out to the fallen man.

    Non-Calvinists maintains that man though dead in sin still posses moral ascendancy to come back to God on their own using their native faith. If they can do it for themselves using their native faith, then man becomes the initiator of his salvation. He doesn’t need to be rescued by God anymore. He can go out of the pit on his own.

    Calvinists maintains that God is the one who gives faith after the fallen man has been made alive spiritually. God’s initiative to change the previous condition into spiritually alive condition is an evidence of God’s initiative in offering salvation to the legitimate beneficiaries.

    1. “God is the initiator of Salvation. God must do it for the reason that man cannot do it for themselves.”

      Agreed.

      “What’s the reason why they cannot do it for themselves? The answer is that the fallen man, has been spiritually dead and has been separated from a holy God due to sin.”

      The grammar is a little odd – fallen man IS spiritually dead and separated from God, not ‘has been’ – but otherwise agreed. This spiritual death, as I have detailed under other topics, refers to man being under the penalty of death due to being lawbreakers, and being a slave to sin/seeking the cravings of the flesh so unable to be morally perfect. And since it only takes one sin to be a lawbreaker, all fall short of the glory of God.

      ” God the Father’s drawing sinners to come to the Son” – This happens to all due to Christ’s death and Resurrection (Jn 12:32), which is indeed one way God initiates the general opportunity for salvation to all mankind.

      “The quickening of the Holy Spirit to the reprobate” – This is never described, implied, or mandated in scripture, as something that happens to a reprobate prior to repentance and faith. Only believers are quickened by the Spirit and receive new life, as it is through identifying with Christ’s death and God raising them up that God makes the believer born again. And Christ makes the believer *literally* born again with a new body at the Resurrection. (Rom 6, I Cor 15, Rom 7, I Pet 1, Titus 3, etc.)

      “are just one of the means of God’s initiatives to effectually reach out to the fallen man” – You seem to be treating ‘drawing’ and ‘quickening by the Spirit’ as the same concept by uniting them into one concept. But scripture treats them very differently. The “draw all things to Myself” Christ did by being lifted up, as Moses lifted the snake up in the wilderness as God offered healing to all those who would look at it. But quickening, making alive, only happens to the believer when the unite in the death of Christ (so the ‘law’ treats the believer as dead, hence no penalty, so the believer ‘dies to the law’ that bound him, etc.) and God raises the believer to new life and grants the indwelling Holy Spirit. Only then can the believer walk by the Spirit and understand and seek spiritual things.

      “Non-Calvinists maintains that man though dead in sin still posses moral ascendancy to come back to God on their own using their native faith.”

      This is a strange and illogical assailment you entail non-Calvinist’s with. No Christian believes man can “come back to God on their own” – at the very heart of Christian orthodoxy is the belief that Christ alone is the way to be reconciled to the Father. No one believes humans have the “power” to save themselves or reach God on their own.

      Ascendency is dominance or controlling influence. Why would believing that man could trust the gospel message when presented with it; the gospel being all about the revelation of the Messiah to man, Christ’s perfect work done on man’s behalf, etc.; give fallen man some form of moral dominance over God?

      Do you believe a drowning man accepting a thrown lifebuoy gains physical dominance over the one graciously pulling him in? Do you believe a poor man cashing a check received from a rich neighbor is showing monetary controlling influence over the rich man by cashing a check? Do you believe accepting a birthday gift gives you moral superiority over the giver? Of course not!

      Receiving Christ by believing in His name and work doesn’t give a person moral dominance or influence of God. It doesn’t even of itself give the right/power/authority to be reconciled to God or adopted by God or saved, etc. It is God’s choice to grant salvation to those who believe. The power and authority stem from God, not man.

      Indeed, a large part of repentance and faith is the recognition that God has the moral ascendancy over us, and that we are subject to judgement in our current state, and so we need a Savior, and that God graciously sent us one who did indeed have the power to accomplish what He claimed to!

      “Yet to all who did receive him, to those who believed in his name, he gave the right to become children of God— children born not of natural descent, nor of human decision or a husband’s will, but born of God.” Jn 1:12-13

      Receiving (aggressively taking/accepting what is offered) is the same concept as ‘believing in His name’ – faith. What gives them the right/power/authority to be children? The faith? NO! God gives the right to those with faith. [You seem, again, to be treating faith as some salvific force or merit that forces God’s hand in and of itself.]

      How are these believers then born as new children of God? Of their own power and will? By two parents having intercourse? By the believer deciding ‘hey I’m gonna be adopted now, poof?’ No! Of God’s power and will, as detailed above. Through baptism the believer unites with the death of Christ and God raises the believer to new life and grants the indwelling Spirit. Now that the believer has the Holy Spirit, the believer is an adopted child of God via the regeneration God gave.

      ” If they can do it for themselves using their native faith, then man becomes the initiator of his salvation.”

      They can’t do it themselves ‘using faith.’ God *grants* salvation to those with faith, graciously.

      I am not even sure how to make sense of your thoughts here. Imagine a ditch-digger is about to die in a mudslide that is coming, but a man on horseback shows himself, warns the man he has mere minutes, reaches down, and offers to help him out. The man in the ditch clasped the offered hand and is lifted out.

      There is only one thing the man in the ditch could be said to initiate: clasping the offered hand/agreeing to be helped. Did that make him the initiator of the offer? No, he only returned the grasp of a hand offered to him first. Did accepting rescue initiate the rescue? Of course not – the offer had already been made, and the effectual rescue happened (was initiated) when the rescuer started pulling up. Simple logic shows that. If the would-be-rescuer chose not to pull him out instead of making good on his promise to rescue, then the man in the ditch could clasp hands all he wanted – nothing would happen. And without the deliverer revealing himself and offering rescue, the man in the ditch would not have even known his danger, let alone had the opportunity to be saved from it.

      “He doesn’t need to be rescued by God anymore. He can go out of the pit on his own.” Again, does clasping the hand of the rescuer now make the man in the ditch able to climb out of the ditch on his own? Of course not!! The one pulling the man out of the ditch/pit is God. Faith/trust that God can do so doesn’t magically confer pit-escaping power on a person.

      “Calvinists maintains that God is the one who gives faith after the fallen man has been made alive spiritually.”

      Which is one reason many of us find it unscriptural, since scripture shows God giving new life in the Spirit to those who believe, not somehow making them alive then giving them faith. It’s also illogical, since there is no reason someone spiritually alive would need to die with Christ and receive new life if they had already passed from death to life.

      “God’s initiative to change the previous condition into spiritually alive condition is an evidence of God’s initiative in offering salvation to the legitimate beneficiaries.”

      No. God’s initiative in offering to change the condition of all men (gospel) and God effectually changing the spiritual condition of the believer is an evidence of God’s initiative in both the offer of salvation to all mankind and God’s initiative (and indeed full accomplishment) of the effectual granting of salvation to the legitimate beneficiaries of the New Covenant; those that believe.

      1. Jenai Writes : “There is only one thing the man in the ditch could be said to initiate: clasping the offered hand/agreeing to be helped. Did that make him the initiator of the offer? No, he only returned the grasp of a hand offered to him first. Did accepting rescue initiate the rescue? Of course not – the offer had already been made, and the effectual rescue happened (was initiated) when the rescuer started pulling up. Simple logic shows that. If the would-be-rescuer chose not to pull him out instead of making good on his promise to rescue, then the man in the ditch could clasp hands all he wanted – nothing would happen. And without the deliverer revealing himself and offering rescue, the man in the ditch would not have even known his danger, let alone had the opportunity to be saved from it.”

        “He doesn’t need to be rescued by God anymore. He can go out of the pit on his own.” Again, does clasping the hand of the rescuer now make the man in the ditch able to climb out of the ditch on his own? Of course not!! The one pulling the man out of the ditch/pit is God. Faith/trust that God can do so doesn’t magically confer pit-escaping power on a person.”
        ——My Response——

        1. Jenai, how can that man be able to clasp his hand to the offer when he is spiritually disabled? we are talking here of spiritual matter, i.e “spiritual rebirth” is totally beyond man’s capability as you agreed above. The fallen man being disconnected to God is dead, and disabled by sin. They are blind and they cannot unblind themselves. He can only react if his dead spirit is given life.

        2. Agreed… God is the one deciding and pulling the rope to raise up the man….. and Jenai, God may do it only for those whom He gives life. Why give life to those whom he will not pull up the rope, I mean to those whom He knows beforehand that will not believe in the Son ?

        3. You said: “…since there is no reason someone spiritually alive would need to die with Christ and receive new life if they had already passed from death to life.” —— [Dying with Christ here has something to do with the doctrine of Sanctification. It does not refer to the event of making the dead spirit into spiritually alive. No one is automatically born spiritually alive upon physical birth.]

        4. You said : “No. God’s initiative in offering to change the condition of all men (gospel) and God effectually changing the spiritual condition of the believer is an evidence of God’s initiative in both the offer of salvation to all mankind and God’s initiative (and indeed full accomplishment) of the effectual granting of salvation to the legitimate beneficiaries of the New Covenant; those that believe.”

        But… Jenai … if your idea is denied by the 4 types of soil. Only the good soil has been changed by God into good by the time the seed fell on them. The other types of soil remained unchanged thus all of them failed. I believe that the Word of God alone is effective, “two edged sword”, but in the case of the 4 types of soil it does not work to the rest of of the types soil. It will only work to the legitimate beneficiaries as what you have quoted.

      2. JT,
        Woah there you go breaking a fundamental rule of exegesis.

        “But… Jenai … if your idea is denied b